Anne Bonny Mini #BookReview Meet Me At The Museum by #AnneYoungson #NewRelease #Literary #Romance @TransworldBooks #MeetMeAtTheMuseum ‘A tender novel’

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Meet Me At The Museum by Anne Youngson
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Synopsis:

Sometimes it takes a stranger to really know who you are

When Tina Hopgood writes a letter of regret to a man she has never met, she doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator, answers it, nor does he.

They’re both searching for something, they just don’t know it yet.

Anders has lost his wife, along with his hopes and dreams for the future. Tina is trapped in a marriage she doesn’t remember choosing.

Slowly their correspondence blossoms as they bare their souls to each other with stories of joy, anguish and discovery. But then Tina’s letters suddenly cease, and Anders is thrown into despair.

Can their unexpected friendship survive?

My Review:

Meet Me At The Museum, is a short novel at just 201 pages. It is a correspondence based exploration of the two central characters. Tina Hopgood writes a letter originally intended to reach P.V. Glob, a professor whom dedicated a novel to her many years ago. Upon the discovery of P.V Glob’s death, she begins writing a series of letters to museum curator Anders Larson.

Through the letters we learn Tina and Anders full history. The hardships they have faced and the lessons they have learned throughout their lives.

What I really enjoyed about the exchange of letters, was that they were conversations you would never possibly hold with anyone face to face. But given the distance they are allowed to connect in an unusual way. They become emotionally intimate, with each offering the other a source of comfort and acknowledgement.

The novel is a story of human connection and it made me wonder, if we all had a pen-pal to confide in would it help us to self-analyse our own behaviours and lifestyle choices.

A tender novel 4*

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A beautiful hardback to add to any collection!

 

Anne Bonny mini #BookReview The Deserter’s Daughter by @SusannaBavin #NewRelease #Historical #Saga #ww1 @AllisonandBusby Can she escape the burden of her past?

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The Deserter’s Daughter by Susanna Bevin
Review copy
Synopsis:

1920, Chorlton, Manchester. As her wedding day draws near, Carrie Jenkins is trying on her dress and eagerly anticipating becoming Mrs Billy Shipton. But all too soon she is reeling from the news that her beloved father was shot for desertion during the Great War. When Carrie is jilted and the close-knit community turns its back on her as well as her mother and her half-sister, Evadne, the plans Carrie nurtured are in disarray.

Desperate to overcome private shock and public humiliation, and with her mother also gravely ill, Carrie accepts the unsettling advances of well-to-do furniture dealer Ralph Armstrong. Through Ralph, Evadne meets the aristocratic Alex Larter, who seems to be the answer to her matrimonial ambitions as well. But both sisters put their faith in men who are not to be trusted, and they will face danger and heartache before they can find the happiness they deserve.

My Mini Review:

The novel is set in 1920 Manchester, with our protagonist Carrie Jenkins a soon-to-be bride. She lives with her jealous sister Evadne and grieving mother. In the opening scenes Father Kelly; the local Catholic priest visits and reveals a devastating secret to the girls. One that will leave them in a cloud of shame.

‘You defied God himself rather than face the shame of your husband being shot at dawn for desertion’ – Father Kelly

The mother’s long-held secret is then exposed to not only her daughters but the entire local community. Their father was court marshalled and executed on the battlefields of ww1.

Carrie thinks that she may find some solace in the arms of her love Billy Shipton. But Ma Shipton, upon hearing the shocking news soon puts an end to any planning nuptials. The Shipton’s don’t wish to be associated with the scandal of marrying into the family of a deserter. Carrie is now alone more than ever, and she harbours a secret of her own.

The women are tested beyond belief, when they lose their employment. They are ostracised from their community, a community that longs to see them in ruin.

In the background there is a spin-off theme of the doctors working to understand ‘mind-horror’. I felt this was a fascinating thread as we still know so little about PTSD and battle fatigue.

This novel has much more of a historical fiction feel to it than a saga. It lacks the warmth of the characters in a saga novel and the local northern dialect. But with that being said, the family is one in turmoil.

A personal story of a ww1 deserter and the family he left behind. 4*

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Susanne Bavin
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Anne Bonny #BlogTour Q&A with @IPatrick_Author #RubiconBook #CrimeFiction #PoliceProcedural @fahrenheitpress Where truth and lies collide. . .

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Rubicon by Ian Patrick
Synopsis:

Two cops, both on different sides of the law – both with the same gangland boss in their sights.

Sam Batford is an undercover officer with the Metropolitan Police who will stop at nothing to get his hands on fearsome crime-lord Vincenzo Guardino’s drug supply.

DCI Klara Winter runs a team on the National Crime Agency, she’s also chasing down Guardino, but unlike Sam Batford she’s determined to bring the gangster to justice and get his drugs off the streets.

Set in a time of austerity and police cuts where opportunities for corruption are rife, Rubicon is a tense, dark thriller that is definitely not for the faint hearted.

Q&A:

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) I left school at sixteen and joined the Civil Service, in Nottingham, as an Admin Clerk. After a few years I decided to apply for the Police. I joined the Metropolitan Police at nineteen and served for twenty-seven years, the majority of which was in Specialist Crime as a Detective Sergeant. I’ve investigated most crimes ranging from Theft to Murder. I’ve also worked in intelligence. My retirement was due to disability. I found out eight years ago that I have Muscular Dystrophy. Retirement led to writing!

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

A) I’ve written for years but never taken it seriously until a few years ago. No Exit press had a short story competition and the prize was a publishing contract. I had no expectation but wrote a short story and sent it in. I made the final three! But never won, (Boo!). However that short story became the first chapter of Rubicon and the rest developed from there. I had the usual round of rejections from publishers and agents until Chris McVeigh, at Fahrenheit Press, picked it up and loved it! In addition the BBC have also felt the same way and optioned it for TV, beginning with a six part series.

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) I read widely and rarely read a series, however I do enjoy: George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh, Ed McBain, Lynda La Plant, Cormac McCarthy, Chuck Palahniuk, Colin Bateman, Saira Viola and Jane Issac. If I were to recommend two books they would be: Fight Club By Chuck Palahniuk and The Road by Cormac McCarthy. Both have strong narrative but entirely opposite in terms of structure and story. Both evoke a strong feeling of ‘what have I just experienced?’ That to me is the mark of a great book. One that leaves the reader marvelling at the storyline and the journey they’ve been on.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) I read all the Sven Hassel books as a child. I was mesmerised by the cruel reality of war he portrayed as he had served as a tank driver. In addition to that, James Herriot was another favourite of mine. I didn’t get Famous Five or any of the ‘classic’ children’s reads. I wanted realism in my fiction. This has stayed with me, hence writing crime.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) Without doubt the reader feedback. I’ve been overwhelmed by the positive response Rubicon has received. There’s no better feeling hearing that you’ve made a moment, in a person’s day, pleasurable. For me that’s why I write.

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) My wife. She has to take the strain with the family while I crack on getting words down! She also speaks sense and is the first reader of anything I’ve written. My greatest source of support, outside of home, has been Jane Isaac. She’s guided me along the way and given advice but never dictated what I should do. She’s a fantastic, established, writer and it’s been wonderful to have her friendship and support.

IP: I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, Abby, and all the book blogging community who support writers’ and keep the world of reading and literature alive.

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Ian Patrick
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