Anne Bonny #BookReview The Good Son by You-Jeong Jeong #CrimeFiction #Psychological #Thriller @LittleBrownUK ‘The Good Son is eerie, dark and creepy’

cover
The Good Son by You-Jeong Jeong
My own copy
Synopsis:

YOU WAKE UP COVERED IN BLOOD
THERE’S A BODY DOWNSTAIRS
YOUR MOTHER’S BODY

YOU DIDN’T DO IT. DID YOU?
HOW COULD YOU, YOU’VE ALWAYS BEEN THE GOOD SON

When Yu-jin wakes up covered in blood, and finds the body of his mother downstairs, he decides to hide the evidence and pursue the killer himself.

Then young women start disappearing in his South Korean town. Who is he hunting? And why does the answer take him back to his brother and father who lost their lives many years ago.

The Good Son is inspired by a true story.

My Review:

The Good Son is a creepy and engaging read. It slowly draws you in to the plot and you HAVE to know more. The central character Yu-Jin is brilliantly written. I cannot wait to read the authors other novels when they are translated into English.

The novel opens with Yu-Jin aka the good son. He is 25yrs old, a model student and athlete. He is also off his meds. . .
He awakens one morning early due to a phone call. But upon awaking quickly notices he is covered in blood. He follows the trail of bloody footprints and find his mother with her throat cut.

He immediately calls the police but realises the situation and what will be interpreted from it. At times his memory is fragmented, and he is struggling to remember what has occurred. This is when we begin to learn more and more about Yu-Jin and what kind of man he really is.

‘After all, being true to life wasn’t the only way to tell a story’

Yu-Jin had recently gotten into law school. He is educated and intelligent but suffers from some form of mental health condition. He has had a troubled childhood and his father and brother’s whereabouts is unknown. He describes his mother as both protective and controlling, yet he maintains an emotional bond. Yu-Jin is a fascinating character, because he is an unreliable narrator of the story. Also because we the reader desperately seek the truth.
Who killed Yu-Jin’s mother? Can Yu-Jin identify the killer?

The Good Son is eerie, dark and creepy.
It’s perfect for fans of the horror/psychological genre. 4*

Anne Bonny #BlogTour #GuestPost by @joel_hames #NoOneWillHear – Who Is Sam Williams? Character profile #NewRelease #CrimeFiction

cover
No One Will Hear by Joel Hames
Synopsis:

Four murders
Four messages
One chance to catch a killer.

Renowned human rights lawyer Elizabeth Maurier lies dead, her body mutilated, her killer unknown. For DI Olivia Martins and her team, it’s a mystery. For the victim’s daughter Lizzy, a poet and academic with a shaky grasp on reality, it’s a tragedy. But for Sam Williams, the man Elizabeth fired a decade ago and hasn’t spoken to since, it’s a whole new world of pain.

Elizabeth’s death has stirred a sleeping past back to life. Former clients are darkening Sam’s door, old enemies returning, ancient cases reopening. It doesn’t help that DI Martins is on his case, the press are dogging his every step, and his girlfriend’s behaviour is increasingly erratic.

But Elizabeth’s murder is just the start. As Sam reluctantly digs his way back into the past, more truths will crumble into lies.

More certainties will shade to doubt.

And more innocent people will die.

Guest Post:

WHO IS SAM WILLIAMS?

Hello and thank you for hosting me today. I’d like to take a moment to introduce Sam Williams, the narrator of No One Will Hear and its central character.

Sam is a lawyer. Years ago he worked as a human rights lawyer at a top law firm fighting big, newsworthy cases with a senior partner, Elizabeth Maurier, who made a habit of rocking the establishment. Sam was a rising star. But things went sour. He won a case, saw a potential killer go free, and found it difficult to live with the consequences. He quit before he got himself fired. He set up his own firm and scrabbled around for clients. The clients he wanted were political prisoners, whistleblowers and victims of state brutality. The clients he got were street dealers, gangsters and liars.
A good lawyer, and a good man. With a bad rep.

Sam’s latest series of misadventures begins with Dead North, published back in March, in which Sam was summoned to Manchester by an old friend to try to get some sense out of a murder suspect. He got the guy talking, but it didn’t end well – where Sam’s involved, it rarely does. In No One Will Hear, things take a turn for the worse. Elizabeth Maurier, his old boss, has been murdered, and Sam is drawn reluctantly into his past, re-examining cases he thought dead and buried, meeting clients he hoped he’d never see again.

Although No One Will Hear is just the second book in this new trilogy, there’s plenty of back story for Sam fans to delve into. The Art of Staying Dead introduces Sam a few months before the events of Dead North, with his career at his lowest point, and throws him head first into a prison riot and a political conspiracy. Then there are the novellas, Victims and Caged, both dealing with his time at Mauriers, the friends, the enemies, the mistakes and the close shaves.

As a lawyer, Sam has his good points: his strength is getting under the skin of a case, questioning the apparently obvious, finding the one line that will open a reluctant informant’s mouth or frighten a suspect enough to start telling the truth. As a man, he makes plenty of mistakes: his focus rarely wavers from the job in hand, so it’s all too easy for him to miss the obvious happening right under his nose. And when he gets it wrong, people often wind up dead. Usually people he doesn’t know. Sometimes, people close to him.

No One Will Hear puts Sam to the test as never before. What looks like a thankless and unimportant task is a matter of life and death. What looks like a relationship in a rut hides something deadly. The powerful are merely floundering in their own weakness. People who come as friends can be enemies. And those who come as enemies can be friends. It’s up to Sam to figure all of this out before more innocent people die.

I hope I’ve given you enough to whet your appetite, and thanks again.

JH
Joel Hames
Twitter
Website

***Don’t miss the other bloggers on the blog tour***
banner