cover volume 1

Inside History magazine ~ www.insidehistorymagazine.co.uk
To purchase this edition in PDF (see code below) click HERE & in Print HERE

***Our second issue’s theme is Crime and the Underworld and will hit our store in January 2020***

About Inside History ~

Inside History takes you closer to the past one theme at a time. Each issue is packed with articles dedicated to each theme by some of the finest historians in their field of expertise.

Our first theme focuses on the grisly history of Medicine and Surgery featuring articles from Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, Dr John Woolf, Louise Wyatt and our team.

Our second issue’s theme is Crime and the Underworld and will hit our store in January 2020.

Q&A with editor Nick Kevern ~

Q) For the readers, can you give a summary of yourself and your new venture?

A) I was a History teacher for about 6 years but I have always wanted to work in magazines. Teaching is a great job but it wasn’t for me so I decided to call it a day. It was an incredibly tough decision to make as it was all I had known. When I left, I became
a freelance sports writer and was lucky enough to write for a number of golf publications. I started my own golf magazine called “Golfhacker” which was dedicated to golfers like me. Those who loved it but weren’t that great. However, history has always been a major part of my DNA and I wanted to create a new history magazine so I took the plunge.

Q) How did you decide on individual themes/era’s and what is in store for readers in the future editions?

A) The vast majority of history magazines are either general history magazines or those that focus on a specific niche within the genre. There are some brilliant history magazines out there so it felt important to do something different. So I decided to theme each issue around a concept or sub genre within the field. The first was the history of Medicine. I chose this as many teachers and students deal with Medicine as part of their GCSE course. It is also a history that is often overlooked but could allow the magazine
to stand out from the crowd. Future editions for 2020 will include Crime and the Underworld, Witchcraft and the Occult, and Power behind the Throne.

Q) As a new venture, who have been your supporters and cheerleaders?

A) I have been very lucky to get some brilliant historians involved with the first issue and already there are plenty gathering for future issues. If I was to highlight a couple of cheerleaders then I would certainly highlight Lindsey Fitzharris, John Woolf and
Louise Wyatt. Lindsey is a very popular figure within the history world and has written the bestselling “The Butchering Art”. She has a huge social media following so when she offered to write for the first issue it was a dream come true as I was crowdfunding.
Her generosity has been immense, and I will always be truly grateful to her for helping to make it happen. John is joining me again for the second issue and is also taking part in our first live event in Chester later in November. I’m also delighted to reveal
that the Old Operating Theatre in London will be our first official stockist. It is an amazing museum and well worth checking if you ever want to see how operations were carried out in the Victorian period.

Q) As someone who personally devours non-fiction. I am aware it can be more expensive than fiction and genre titles. Does Inside History magazine offer the reader’s the chance to sample title’s and the content within via the articles?

A) Those involved with the magazine are a mix of published and unpublished writers. Those that are published have carefully linked their articles to their published books. With this in mind, it gives our readers a really good sample of their work and we are hoping that it will encourage the reader to want to know more. At the end of each article we provide details of their latest books. For unpublished writers that we include I hope that it can lead to bigger things for them and give them the exposure that they deserve.
As we all know, writing is a very difficult industry so if we can help writers in any way then it is certainly worth it.

Special offer for Anne Bonny Book Reviews Blog members ~
Get £1 off your first issue (PDF EDITION) by using this code MOXQ3YCWXRXA
at checkout.
www.insidehistorymagazine.ecwid.com

Upcoming events ~
event

Contact & Social media links ~
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Twitter
Website  – Subscribe for further information and offers
Website – Book Store
(with available email contact)

Dr Lindsey Fitzharris
LF TBA
Twitter
Website
YouTube link To Lindsey on the Joe Rogan Podcast
Link to details of Lindsey’s next book
The Butchering Art (Non-affiliate link)
Synopsis ~
DAILY MAIL, GUARDIAN AND OBSERVER BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2017
Winner of the 2018 PEN/E.O. Wilson Prize for Literary Science Writing
Shortlisted for the 2018 Wellcome Book Prize
Shortlisted for the 2018 Wolfson Prize

The story of a visionary British surgeon whose quest to unite science and medicine delivered us into the modern world – the safest time to be alive in human history

In The Butchering Art, historian Lindsey Fitzharris recreates a critical turning point in the history of medicine, when Joseph Lister transformed surgery from a brutal, harrowing practice to the safe, vaunted profession we know today.

Victorian operating theatres were known as ‘gateways of death’, Fitzharris reminds us, since half of those who underwent surgery didn’t survive the experience. This was an era when a broken leg could lead to amputation, when surgeons often lacked university degrees, and were still known to ransack cemeteries to find cadavers. While the discovery of anaesthesia somewhat lessened the misery for patients, ironically it led to more deaths, as surgeons took greater risks. In squalid, overcrowded hospitals, doctors remained baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high.

At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more dangerous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: Joseph Lister, a young, melancholy Quaker surgeon. By making the audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection – and could be treated with antiseptics – he changed the history of medicine forever.

With a novelist’s eye for detail, Fitzharris brilliantly conjures up the grisly world of Victorian surgery, revealing how one of Britain’s greatest medical minds finally brought centuries of savagery, sawing and gangrene to an end.

Dr John Woolf ~ Author of ‘The Wonders’ and ‘Stephen Fry’s Victorian Secrets’
JW TW
Twitter
Website
Link to The Wonders (non-affiliate link)
Synopsis ~
A radical new history of the Victorian age: meet the forgotten and extraordinary freak performers whose talents and disabilities helped define an era.

On 23 March, 1844, General Tom Thumb, at 25 inches tall, entered the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace and bowed low to Queen Victoria. On both sides of the Atlantic, this meeting marked a tipping point in the nineteenth century – the age of the freak was born.

Bewitching all levels of society, it was a world of astonishing spectacle – of dwarfs, giants, bearded ladies, Siamese twins and swaggering showmen – and one that has since inspired countless novels, films and musicals. But the real stories (human dramas that so often eclipsed the fantasy presented on the stage), of the performing men, women and children, have been forgotten or marginalized in the histories of the very people who exploited them.

In this richly evocative account, Dr John Woolf uses a wealth of recently discovered material to bring to life the sometimes tragic, sometimes triumphant, always extraordinary stories of people who used their (dis)abilities and difference to become some of the first international celebrities. And through their lives we discover afresh some of the great transformations of the age: the birth of showbusiness, of celebrity, of advertising, of ‘alternative facts’; while also exploring the tensions, both then and now, between the power of fame, the impact of exploitation and our fascination with ‘otherness’.

Louise Wyatt
LWAHON
Twitter
Website
Link to A History Of Nursing (non-affiliate)
Synopsis ~
A History of Nursing explores the history of nursing by investigating the earliest records of the caring profession, how it progressed and what established it along the way to becoming the nursing we see today. It starts at the beginning of the story – how, once upon a time, all we had to depend on was Mother Nature.

Over time, education and standards improved for the safety, development and governance of the profession. Not everything was plain sailing and the book introduces lesser-known people who made this possible, sometimes at great cost to themselves, and the effect military nursing had on the nineteenth century in turning nursing from religious principles to the secular nursing we see today.

How did nursing go from being knowledge handed down through ancient scripts, folklore and sometimes by accident, to the degree-level, accountable practice of modern times? And why do nurses not wear hats anymore? A History of Nursing answers these questions and more.

***Don’t forget to check out the website’s store. How cool is this plague doctor poster for just £10***
plague doctor poster

 

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