Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview A Sinner’s Prayer by @EllingtonWright M.P Wright 5*Genius #NewRelease #CrimeFiction #Series #JTEllington @bwpublishing #Bristol #ASinnersPrayer

ASinnersPrayer_square
A Sinner’s Prayer by M.P. Wright
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

Saying farewell to the dark side doesn’t mean the dark side wants rid of you. And I was about to be reminded of that fact.

1970, St Pauls, Bristol. A new decade, and JT Ellington is determined it will be a quiet one. He’s stepped away from the private-eye game to scratch a living, respectable at last, as a school caretaker.

Still his nights are full of torment – guilt and ghosts that no prayers will banish but it’s not until the past comes calling in the unwelcome form of Superintendent Fletcher that JT’s resolve is truly tested.

Fletcher has a job for JT – and the hard-nosed cop can’t be refused. A young man, Nikhil Suresh, has disappeared hours before his wedding; rumours abound and his family is distraught. JT is to investigate.

With what feels like blood money in his pocket, JT is plunged deep into a demi-monde of vice, violence and forbidden passion. An extraordinary, malevolent enemy is intent on destroying him. Now – seeking survival and redemption – JT must play as dirty and dangerous as those who want him dead.

My Review ~

‘Sooner or later, everyone round you dies JT. They are in hell, everyone you ever loved, all either burnt up or here rotting with me’

The title opens with JT confronted by the ghostly apparition of Carnell Harris. We become quickly aware of the past characters that have featured in the series. Their links to other returning characters and the toll their pain and losses takes on JT’s psyche. JT Ellington is a haunted man, haunted by his past, haunted by the present and haunted by the future!

‘Carnell Harris was dead because of me’

 The title opens on Friday 13th August 1971 in Bristol. JT is now 48yrs old and we learn that 1970’s Britain is no more kinder to JT than the previous swinging 1960’s. JT faces an avalanche of daily racism, discrimination and prejudice. A fictionalised version of the windrush experience. JT is currently a caretaker at a local primary school, having abandoned the life of a PI for a secure lifestyle for his 6yr old niece Chloe.
But as usual… Trouble lurks closely behind every corner of Jt’s life…

JT is accosted by Detective Inspector Fletcher again, (now Superintendent) He encourages or more likely coerces JT into dealing with the case of a missing shopkeepers son Nikhil Suresh. However, to unravel the mystery of Nikhil’s disappearing act, JT must navigate the world of arranged marriage.

‘I decided to take the Superintendent’s thirty pieces of silver’

We are reintroduced to a wide-range or reoccurring characters such as Aunt Pearl, Uncle Gabe and my favourite Loretta Harris.
But JT’s main focus remains the case of the missing bridegroom. The case becomes even more entangled when we learn of the men living in secret due to their sexuality. Can JT uncover the most precious secrets of those close to Nikhil? Or will Nikhil’s death remain unsolved?

‘The man you search for is with the Jinn’

The LGBT theme in 1970’s England, enables the reader to explore the underground gay scene, drag queens and others society has rejected. The era is one of oppression and it is shocking to think this is not that long ago. Needlessly, the author deals with such matters with tact, delicacy and lets the emotion lead the narrative.

‘The dead man had been associating with monsters, and he’d clearly gone on to pay a very high price for it’

When a local white child’s body is discovered at a local golf course. JT begins to question a link. But why would anyone strangle and beat an 11yr old boy? Is there a definitive link to Nikhil’s disappearance?
One thing is for certain, if the murder of a local white boy is reported in connection with Nikhil, it could unleash all manner of racial tensions, violence and possible riots on the streets. JT must act fast!

When the case is potentially linked to organised crime and gangsters of The Firm. JT calls in the big guns and by big guns, he means Vic!
‘Vic was proof that a black man could live by his own rules in Britain’

Vic is without a shadow of a doubt, one of my favourite male characters in the series (aside from JT). I would love to see the series developed into a TV series and think Idris Elba would make an exceptional Vic we would all fall in love with!

‘White folk were as happy here to let a black man or woman take the fall for them as they were back on Bim, whether they had committed the damn crime or not’

The novel deals with not only tough issues, but complex issues. The racial tensions of the decade are fully explored, as are the potential various motivations. Fear, ignorance and lack of self awareness all play a part in the up rise of white British racism. The plague it holds over its victims is fully explored….
‘I was perhaps descending down into hell and the devil himself would be waiting for me’ 

There are passages of beautiful prose from M.P. Wright and he has excelled himself once again with A Sinner’s Prayer.
‘I imagined prehistoric wolves making the same gesture before they howled at men, women and children sat shivering in their caves’…
‘A trio of deadly executioners, who lived in the knowledge that certain death always followed in their wake’

Dark crime fiction to mix with your dark rum on the sunny summer evenings!
*Raises glass to JT Ellington*
A series finale and a character that will live on in the hearts of his readers.
5* Genius

MPW
M.P. Wright
Twitter
My Q&A with M.P. Wright
My Review of, The Restless Coffins

banner

Anne Bonny #BookReview The Mobster’s Lament by Ray Celestin 5* Genius #NewRelease #HistoricalFiction @MantleBooks ‘Jazz musicians, dirty politicians, private eyes, the mob, hitmen and scam artists come together to make one hell of a story!’

cover
The Mobster’s Lament by Ray Celestin ~ #3 in the City Blues Quartet
My Own Copy ~ Hardback Book

Synopsis ~

* In Ray Celestin’s gripping third book, The Mobster’s Lament, it’s a mobster’s last chance to escape the clutches of New York’s mafia crime families: but as a blizzard descends on NYC, a ruthless serial killer is tracking his every move. *

Fall, 1947. Private Investigator Ida Davis has been called to New York by her old partner, Michael Talbot, to investigate a brutal killing spree in a Harlem flophouse that has left four people dead. But as they delve deeper into the case, Ida and Michael realize the murders are part of a larger conspiracy that stretches further than they ever could have imagined.

Meanwhile, Ida’s childhood friend, Louis Armstrong, is at his lowest ebb. His big band is bankrupt, he’s playing to empty venues, and he’s in danger of becoming a has-been, until a promoter approaches him with a strange offer to reignite his career . . .

And across the city, nightclub manager and mob fixer Gabriel Leveson’s plans to flee New York are upset when he’s called in for a meeting with the ‘boss of all bosses’, Frank Costello. Tasked with tracking down stolen mob money, Gabriel must embark on a journey through New York’s seedy underbelly, forcing him to confront demons from his own past, all while the clock is ticking on his evermore precarious escape plans.

From its tenements to its luxury hotels, from its bebop clubs to the bustling wharves of the Brooklyn waterfront, award-winning author Ray Celestin’s The Mobster’s Lament is both a gripping crime novel and a vivid, panoramic portrait of 1940s New York as the mob rises to the height of its powers . . .

My Review ~

This series has proven to be phenomenal reading. The author knows how to capture the historical era and atmosphere of post war America perfectly. The characters of Ida Davies and Michael Talbot have continued to grow with added depth to their circumstance. In this novel the focus is heavily on Michael and his doctor son Thomas, who finds himself facing the electric chair for multiple murders….

The title opens with a newspaper article dated August 1947. The article tells of a local NYC hospital worker who is charged with five counts of first-degree murder. Violent and gory deaths scandalised as a ‘Harlem voodoo cult’. The murders took place at a negro flophouse and with the accused an African American male, he is going to need a miracle to be either found not-guilty or acquitted.
This is when Michael brings in Ida to investigate.

Thomas Talbot is the only man left alive, which begs the question; what was he doing there? And how is he connected to the murder victims?

‘Welcome to Harlem’

The novels take’s you on a journey through Harlem, with a variety of characters telling their story. From hookers and their pimps, to junkies and runaways. Ida must interview anyone and everyone, if Thomas is to be set free. But is Thomas telling the truth?

‘The empire of night had arisen’

‘Michael had navigated the torments of people out on the streets’

Aside from Ida and Michael trying to solve Tom’s case. We also meet Gabriel, a man with a painful past who works for the mob. Gabriel works predominately out of the Copa Lounge, when he is asked to investigate missing money. In total 2 million dollars is missing and the mob’s approach to being ripped off is well-known.
Gabriel is a deep, thoughtful individual who has had enough of the ‘gangster’ way of life. He is making his own plans and re-writing his destiny.

‘Like every other mobster, the longer he stayed in the life, the closer he got to a prison cell or a shallow grave’

The novel details the various mobster families the relationships between each other and Gabriel’s connection to each member. I found this fascinating. I think we tend to romanticise the 1940’s, the mob and the post-war feeling. With The Mobster’s Lament the author leaves you under no illusion about how violent the gangsters can be.

There are a series of newspaper articles throughout the novel itself. They add to the atmospheric feel. When I opened the novel, I felt that I was walking amongst the characters and watching all the action unfold.
Ray Celestin does not disappoint, not on one chapter, paragraph or sentence.

The characterisation is superb, from hitmen with murder counts into the treble digits. To following Louis Armstrong and the rise of the American jazz music scene.
To an intelligent black hoodlum who is aware of the way the land lies and he doesn’t miss a trick.

‘It seemed like madness and addiction followed the whole generation around’

Jazz musicians, dirty politicians, private eyes, the mob, hitmen and scam artists come together to make one hell of a story!
5* Genius

RC
Ray Celestin
Website ~ Well worth a visit!
Instagram ~ Also worth a visit to get a feel for the series!

TAJ
The Axeman’s Jazz by Ray Celestin ~ #1 in the City Blues Jazz Quartet

Synopsis ~

Winner of the CWA John Creasey New Blood Dagger for Best Debut Crime Novel of the Year.
Shortlisted for the Theakston’s Crime Novel of the Year Award.
As recommended on the Radio 2 Arts Show with Claudia Winkleman.

Inspired by a true story, set against the heady backdrop of jazz-filled, mob-ruled New Orleans, The Axeman’s Jazz by Ray Celestin is a gripping thriller announcing a major talent in historical crime fiction.

New Orleans, 1919. As a dark serial killer – the Axeman – stalks the city, three individuals set out to unmask him:

Detective Lieutenant Michael Talbot – heading up the official investigation, but struggling to find leads, and harbouring a grave secret of his own.

Former detective Luca d’Andrea – now working for the mafia; his need to solve the mystery of the Axeman is every bit as urgent as that of the authorities.

And Ida – a secretary at the Pinkerton Detective Agency. Obsessed with Sherlock Holmes and dreaming of a better life, she stumbles across a clue which lures her and her musician friend, Louis Armstrong, to the case –and into terrible danger . . .

As Michael, Luca and Ida each draw closer to discovering the killer’s identity, the Axeman himself will issue a challenge to the people of New Orleans: play jazz or risk becoming the next victim.

DMB
Dead Man’s Blues by Ray Celestin ~ #2 in the City Blues Quartet

Synopsis ~

*Shortlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger for Best Crime Novel of 2017*
Dead Man’s Blues is the gripping historical crime novel from Ray Celestin, following on from the events of his debut The Axeman’s Jazz, winner of the CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger for Best First Novel 2014.

Chicago, 1928. In the stifling summer heat three disturbing events take place. A clique of city leaders is poisoned in a fancy hotel. A white gangster is found mutilated in an alleyway in the Blackbelt. And a famous heiress vanishes without a trace.

Pinkerton detectives Michael Talbot and Ida Davis are hired to find the missing heiress by the girl’s troubled mother. But it proves harder than expected to find a face that is known across the city, and Ida must elicit the help of her friend Louis Armstrong.

While the police take little interest in the Blackbelt murder crime scene photographer, Jacob Russo, can’t get the dead man’s image out of his head, and so he embarks on his own investigation.

And Dante Sanfelippo – rum-runner and fixer – is back in Chicago on the orders of Al Capone, who suspects there’s a traitor in the ranks and wants Dante to investigate. But Dante is struggling with problems of his own as he is forced to return to the city he thought he’d never see again . . .

As the three parties edge closer to the truth, their paths cross and their lives are threatened. But will any of them find the answers they need in the capital of blues, booze and corruption?

Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview The Strawberry Thief by Joanne Harris @Joannechocolat 5* Genius #NewRelease #Literature #LiteraryFiction @orionbooks

cover
The Strawberry Thief by Joanne Harris
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

Vianne Rocher has settled down. Lansquenet-sous-Tannes, the place that once rejected her, has finally become her home. With Rosette, her ‘special’ child, she runs her chocolate shop in the square, talks to her friends on the river, is part of the community. Even Reynaud, the priest, has become a friend.

But when old Narcisse, the florist, dies, leaving a parcel of land to Rosette and a written confession to Reynaud, the life of the sleepy village is once more thrown into disarray.

The arrival of Narcisse’s relatives, the departure of an old friend and the opening of a mysterious new shop in the place of the florist’s across the square – one that mirrors the chocolaterie, and has a strange appeal of its own – all seem to herald some kind of change: a confrontation, a turbulence – even, perhaps, a murder…

My Review ~ 

‘Forty years a witch and now, at last, I have become a puritan’

I am completely new to this series and Joanne Harris’s writing. I do have several on my tbr pile, which I will be aiming to read over the summer. I found The Strawberry Thief to be exceptionally well written, the writing to be both magical and emotive. It really is a feel good summer read for those seeking quirky and eccentric characters.
So lets begin…

‘Snow, out of a clear blue sky. Someone will be dead by dawn’ – Rosette

The title opens with Vianne Rocher who lives with her daughter Rosette in Lansquenet-Sous-Tannes and together they run the local chocolate shop. Vianne deeply misses older daughter Anouk whom is living in Paris. Vianne’s pain at their separation is also followed with a sense of submission to this perfectly normal coming-of-age situation. No matter what age or the circumstance, when your oldest child flies the nest, every mother feels an added sense of loss.

The novel has narratives from various points of view. Which includes Father Reynaud, but my favourite point of view, was that of young Rosette. Who unintentionally becomes the talk of town, when elderly shop owner Narcisse passes away and leaves her an expensive piece of land. Even Vianne is unsure why Narcisse would leave such a gift to a young child. Rosette is often referred to as ‘not-normal, she is often pitied. But despite all the challenges she may face in life. Someone was looking out for her, someone thought she was extra special and someone named her The Strawberry Thief.

‘Making friends isn’t easy when you’re different’

The novel draws in various characters with the reading of the will. We meet the ‘delightful’ Michele Montour (Narcisse’s materialistic daughter) and Vianne’s on/off lover Roux. Rosette is definitely more aware than people give her credit for and in her internal dialogue she begins to question her life and routines. That is until she sees a ghost in Narcisse’s empty shop and becomes entranced by a newcomer to the village.

‘Evil has no feet’

The village is alive with the mystery of Narcisse’s will and speculation turns quickly to gossip. Why did he entrust such a prime piece of land to a young girl of 16yrs old who has her head in the clouds? What makes Rosette so special?
Only one man holds the answers and they are sealed behind the privilege of confession.

Before his death Narcisse had written a letter Which upon his death would be given to Father Reynaud. The letter is a manuscript of Narcisse’s life and within we learn all the secrets he held close to his heart and the deep bond he shared with another.
It is a story that slowly broke my heart, it cuts deep into the human psyche and why we are the way we are. Why we feel the emotions we feel.

‘Love redeems us even when we think ourselves irredeemable’

I highly recommend this title for those whom enjoy quirky characters, beautiful writing and the feeling of being in a small French village as you watch the story unfold.
5* Genius

JH
Joanne Harris
Website
Twitter

***Don’t miss the other bloggers on the blog tour****
banner

 

Anne Bonny #BookReview A High Mortality Of Doves & The Boy Who Lived With The Dead by Kate Ellis @kateellisauthor 5* Genius #HistoricalFiction @PiatkusBooks #AlbertLincoln #Series

cover
A High Mortality Of Doves by Kate Ellis
My own Copy ~ Paperback Book

Synopsis ~

1919. The Derbyshire village of Wenfield is still reeling from four terrible years of war, and now, just when the village is coming to terms with the loss of so many of its sons, the brutal murder of a young girl shatters its hard-won tranquillity.

Myrtle Bligh is found stabbed and left in woodland, her mouth slit to accommodate a dead dove, a bird of peace.

During the war Myrtle worked as a volunteer nurse with Flora Winsmore, the local doctor’s daughter, caring for badly wounded soldiers at the nearby big house, Tarnhey Court.

When two more women are found murdered in identical circumstances, Inspector Albert Lincoln is sent up from London, a man not only wounded in war but damaged in peace by the death of his young son and his cold, loveless marriage. Once in Wenfield, Albert begins to investigate the three recent murders and the Cartwright family of Tarnhey Court and their staff fall under suspicion as their hidden lives and secrets are uncovered.

With rumours of a ghostly soldier with a painted face being spotted near the scene of the murders, the village is thrown into a state of panic – and with the killer still on the loose, who will be the next to die at the hands of this vicious angel of death?

My Review ~

A High Morality Of Doves is set in the Derbyshire village of Wenfield in 1919. The village is reeling after 4yrs of war. The novel surrounds the cases of murdered females, left on display with a dead dove in their mouths.
With the dove being the symbolic bird of peace, is someone trying to send a bizarre message to the local community? Or to the local police? In steps Inspector Albert Lincoln from London and the Met police, to crack the case.

Local resident Myrtle is lured to the woods via a letter from her dead fiancé Stanley. Myrtle was aware of the telegram notification of his death and even consulted mediums in the local New Mills. But with the letter, also comes hope. Is Stanley alive?

‘She’d been in these woods a hundred times or more. But she’d never gone there alone’

Only for Myrtle, this mistake will cost her, her life.

Flora is the local doctor’s daughter and was friend and confidant to Myrtle. The women had previously worked together as VADs during the war. But when war was over Myrtle must return to the mills and Flora to her father’s surgery. The different places in the class system, keeping them apart.
When Jack Blemthwaite discovers Myrtle’s body, Flora’s father is summoned. But Flora is unsettled by the local communities rush to blame Jack due to his absence at war!

Local resident Annie, receives notification her son Harold is MIA
‘Better a hero than a coward. Cowards were the lowest of the low and being the mother of a coward would have been the ultimate humiliation’

The novel fully portrays life for village residents in war time and the harsh reality of shame on those deemed ‘coward’s’. The war impacts on everyone’s lives and it was refreshing to see this be brought to the main theme of the novel and not used as a backdrop.
Then Annie receives a note…

Flora attempts to involve herself into the case, assisting a reluctant Sgt Teague. She attempts to use her influence to help clear Jack’s name.
‘The self-appointed jury that’s found Jack guilty without the benefit of a trial’
We become aware Jack is developmentally delayed and appears as a child trapped in a man’s body. But if Jack isn’t the killer then who is?

The callous lure continues, with more women lured to their deaths. Then Inspector Albert Lincoln is called in to assist. Albert is a broken man himself both physically and emotionally. His wife Mary barely talks to him after the death of their son Fredrick. Albert has a broken soul, but can he catch the killer before he takes more souls for his own.

The village has seen so much change in five years, with the effects of the war impacting nearly all the individual families.
‘For four years life had been cheap. Now it was precious’
The village residents are desperate to see an end to the tragic loss of lives. But what is the killer’s motive?

‘Who can fathom the mysteries of the human mind, especially after this war’

Kate Ellis brings the post ww1 are alive on the pages and via the emotions of the characters within the village of Wenfield.
The final reveal is simply astounding and worth every second spent reading. 5* Genius

cover
The Boy Who Lives With The Dead by Kate Ellis ~ #2 Albert Lincoln Series
My Own Copy ~ Hardback Book

Synopsis ~ 

The second historical thriller in the Albert Lincoln series by acclaimed crime writer Kate Ellis.

A child haunted by the past . . . A village troubled by secrets . . .

It is 1920 and Scotland Yard detective DI Albert Lincoln is still reeling from the disturbing events of the previous year. Trapped in a loveless marriage and tired of his life in London, he’s pleased when he’s called to a new case in the North West of England.

Before the War, he led the unsuccessful investigation into the murder of little Jimmy Rudyard in the village of Mabley Ridge. Now a woman has been murdered there and another child is missing, the sole witness being a traumatised boy who lives in a cemetery lodge. Albert’s first investigation was a failure but this time he is determined to find the truth . . . and the missing child.

As Albert delves into the lives of the village residents he uncovers shocking secrets and obsessions. With the help of a village schoolmistress with her own secret past, Albert closes in on Jimmy’s killer. Then, as more bodies are discovered, he realises that his young witness from the cemetery lodge is in grave danger, from somebody he calls ‘the Shadow Man’. As Albert discovers more about the victims he finds information that might bring him a step closer to solving a mystery of his own: the whereabouts of his lost son.

My Review ~

The Boy Who Lived With The Dead, picks up 18 months after the previous novel in the series A High Morality Of Doves. This time the case that Albert Lincoln is called to is in Cheshire. It is the location of a previous murder, that Albert was unsuccessful in solving. The case of little Jimmy Rudyard weighs heavy on his mind. With a woman murdered and a baby now missing. Albert must work quickly to solve the case and locate the baby.

The novel opens in September 1920, at the village of Mabley Ridge, Cheshire. Patience Bailey is found buried alive in a local graveyard. With local child Peter confiding in his school teacher Miss Davies (Gwen) that he witnessed somebody at the scene. Someone he refers to as the shadow man. Only the situation becomes more complex, when Peter is revealed to be the brother of Jimmy Rudyard.

Gwen’s backstory is more complex, and she makes for a likely sleuth alongside Albert.
‘According to her family, her loss was a punishment that had to be endured; sometimes she hated her family’

Mallory Ghent married his wife Jane for her wealth, their marriage is not one of love or romance. Patience was Jane’s paid companion, having helped Jane overcome her own personal demons. Jane seeks justice for her companion’s killer.

Albert has developed into a full workaholic to avoid his wife Mary. His wife has become consumed with visiting spiritualists aided by her mother Vera. Mary wishes to contact their son Fredrick, But Albert firmly believes she has merely been taken in by a bunch of charlatans. He relishes the chance to escape his home life.

‘Corpses don’t bury themselves, somebody in Mabley Ridge had killed her’

With the introduction of Albert into Patience’s case, we finally learn the facts of Jimmy Rudyard’s murder. Peter claimed a man on horseback took Jimmy, he was never believed, but was he telling the truth?

Albert seek redemption for failing to find Jimmy’s killer and plans to unearth all the secrets of the village, if that is what it takes.

I have pages of note and quotes, but to include them all would provide spoilers. The novel is very similar to the first in the series. This is not a criticism, I am merely just referencing the era, themes and development of characters etc. The novels are best read in order to get the most from the series.

The novel has a perfect ending that leads straight into the next novel.
Which I cannot wait to read!
The series is pure perfection.
5* Genius

KE
Kate Ellis
Website
Twitter

Anne Bonny #BookReview My Love Story by Tina Turner #TheAutobiography 5* Genius @LoveTinaTurner

cover
My Love Story by Tina Turner ~ The Autobiography
My Own Copy ~ Hardback Book

Synopsis ~

Love’s got everything to do with it.

Tina Turner is the Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll, a musical icon celebrating her 60th year in the industry. In this dramatic autobiography, she tells the story of a truly remarkable life in the spotlight.

From her early years picking cotton in Nutbush, Tennessee to her rise to fame alongside Ike Turner, and finally to her phenomenal success in the 1980s and beyond, Tina candidly examines her personal history, from her darkest hours to her happiest moments and everything in between.

In her honest and heart-felt voice, Tina reveals:

· How (love) and a kidney transplant saved her life – and how her new husband made an incredible personal sacrifice
· How she has coped with the tragic suicide of her son
· How ex-husband Ike Turner forced her to go to a brothel on their wedding night… and why she tried to kill herself because of Ike’s mistresses
· The Cinderella moment when David Bowie made Tina a star …
· …and the day Mick Jagger ripped her skirt off!
AND MUCH MORE

Brimming with her trademark blend of strength, energy, heart and soul, My Love Story is a gripping, surprising memoir, as memorable and entertaining as any of her greatest hits.

My Review ~

‘I knew when to run away from snakes’

This title was a Christmas present from my husband, and I could not wait to start reading it. What I found inside was an incredible story of a woman that has fascinated me for many years.
After all, before there was Beyonce, there was Tina Turner…

‘I’d laboured all my life. Nobody gave me one thing’

The novel opens telling the childhood of Anna Mae Bullock, it is emotionally painful to digest. As it is revealed that Tina’s relationship with her mother was an extremely difficult one. I knew what was about to come with Ike and I at least wanted Tina to have known a childhood of love and warmth. But for Tina, it was not to be…

‘I knew that my mother didn’t love me’

It is worth noting that despite Tina never having had her mother’s affections, she never let it prevent her from taking care of her in later years. Something I found reminiscent of my own life, in a different way.
Then Tina meets Ike…

‘Ike didn’t just look dangerous. He was dangerous’

The brutality of their marriage is detailed and again, makes for painful reading. Eventually resulting in Tina’s attempt to take her own life…

‘I was meant to survive. I was here for a reason’

‘What had been ugly and hateful between us before he started using drugs became worse with every snort’
Ike’s decline into drug addiction, would ultimately force Tina to leave.

‘I wasn’t just running away from Ike. I was running toward a new life’
Tina would end their 14yr marriage and find herself alone and beginning a new start at 37yrs old. When her divorce was finally settled 2yrs later, she would leave with her children, two car’s and her name. Tina would have to start over! And start over she did, becoming a figure of female empowerment and strength.

With a little help and some much needed love from stars of the music industry. Tina would re-launch her music career, which is also when I became a fan. I was only born in 1983, so for Tina’s first popularity in music and marriage to Ike, I was mostly unaware until I became much older.

My introduction to Tina’s music would come when my father bought the album Foreign Affair. I was only 6yrs old when this album was released. Yet I know all the words of by heart and would spend my days with a hairbrush microphone screaming out the hits and storming the lounge carpet, like Tina stormed the stage. Of course, I also flicked my hair, in true Tina style!

Tina has long been a hero of mine, but this autobiography filled in the gaps of her history, I never knew. It is an incredible read.
I discovered along the read, that not only am I a huge fan of Tina Turner the stage persona, but I am also a huge fan of Anna Mae Bullock too. 5* Genius

TT
Tina Turner
Website
Twitter