Anne Bonny #BookReview & #Extract The Secret by @jenwellswriter 5* Genius #Saga #NewRelease @Aria_Fiction #DualTimeline #HistoricalFiction #TheSecret

cover
The Secret by Jennifer Wells
Review Copy
Synopsis:

A tightly woven story full of secrets and lies with a breathtaking finale.

London 1920 – Troubled young dancer, Lily, is invited to remote Elmridge House, home of the wealthy theatre benefactor Dr Cuthbertson to escape her troubled past. An isolated guest room and a surprise pregnancy leave her longing to return to the stage and her London life. She soon discovers that Elmridge House is not all that it seems – the house holds secrets which make it difficult for her to leave.

Missensham 1942 – Young nurse Ivy Watts is called out to a patient at Elmridge House, home of the aloof Mrs Cuthbertson and reclusive Dr Cuthbertson. Ivy is entranced by the opulence of the house and its glamorous past, but when she tells her mother about Mrs Cuthbertson, her mother becomes fearful and forbids her from returning to the house. What secrets does Elmridge House hold? And why does Lily’s mother live in fear of the mysterious Mrs Cuthbertson?

My Review:

I have previously read and reviewed The Murderess by Jennifer Wells, which I found to be perfect for a Sunday afternoons reading. With The Secret, I personally think the author has really stepped up her game, in carving out her name within the saga genre.
I was absolutely gripped throughout and found both historical era’s to be fascinating. From the 1920s ballet scene, to the district nursing in a humble village in the 1940s.
The author has managed to create drama that lures you to both timeframes.

The novel opens in 1943, with Ivy living in fear but from what or whom we are not sure. Then the novel jumps back to September 1942 and begins to tell the tale of what lead to Ivy’s fear. We learn of her first acquaintance with Mrs Cuthbertson!
Ivy is a local nurse, but she works specifically within the area of adoption and often in the upper most secrecy, given the era. I got the impression Ivy’s heart was always in the right place. She just simply never had enough life experience to know any different. Ivy has grown up in poverty and taking care of her ailing mother, who has suffered childhood polio. They scrape by with the help of their good friend Sadie. The midwife that also brought Ivy into the world.

Mrs Cuthbertson comes across at first as a cantankerous old battle axe. Especially, when she first meets Ivy demanding un-prescribed medication for her son. Why does she want the medication? And what is it that made her so set in her horrid ways?

‘There was something not right with her mind’ 

Ivy makes friends with fellow nurse Bridget, whom is brash and gossipy. Also quiet local assistant Violet. The three form the team at the Missensham Cottage Hospital. But it is when Ivy begins snooping into Mrs Cuthbertson’s need for medication, that she uncovers a world of secrets that will shake her to the core…

Past secrets come to life and we uncover a wealth of knowledge about Ivy and everyone she knows. It is a clash of culture, class structure and life choices made, that brings all the characters together in their shared past deeds.

I love that women’s issues lay at the heart of the story. The dual timeline of 1920s/1940s works exceptionally well, given that these era’s generated so much change for women of the future. There is a shocking showdown at the end and one I NEVER saw coming at all! With extra side note ‘THAT LAST PAGE!!!!5* Genius 

Jennifer Wells
Jennifer Wells
Twitter
Website

Extract:

I thought nothing more of Mrs Cuthbertson for almost a week. It turned out that she was Bridget’s problem and I was glad of it. Even when I walked in on Bridget fumbling through the medicine cabinet, her hands full and her face guilty, I said nothing and turned on my heel. Over the week, however, I did notice some changes in Bridget; she had a new coat from Partridge’s, had lightened her hair from its original chestnut to a shade that was almost blonde, and when I borrowed one of her textbooks, I found six new pound notes which sprang into tight curls when I opened the pages.
But Bridget’s luck did not last and she was called back to her family home in Fulham on Friday morning as an unexploded bomb had been found at the back of her parents’ garden, leaving them shocked and in need of their daughter. It was customary for a nurse to have twenty-four hours off for a family emergency and I wondered how I would cope without Bridget, but between us, Violet and I managed to tend to all the patients, changing dressings and administering medicines as if we had been doing it for years.
It was not until I came off shift on Sunday morning that I felt I could really relax. I left the hospital and went straight to the nurses’ house, putting the kettle on before slumping down in the armchair by the stove without even changing out of my uniform. An hour had passed since Bridget had called the main hospital from a telephone box outside Parsons Green tube station with the news that she was on her way back to Missensham and, although she missed the doctor’s rounds, I was relieved to know that she was returning.
When the phone in the hallway rang, I answered, expecting Violet’s voice on the hospital line with a request for help on the ward or a notification about more patients transferring in from London. But when I took the call, I knew instantly that it was not Violet.
‘Nurse, are you there?’ Despite the crackle on the line, the woman’s voice was unmistakable and as I heard the words, I could imagine them on the lips of the night visitor, the woman who had sat opposite me at the kitchen table and demanded medicine that had not been prescribed.
I glanced at the clock, the hand clicking on to the hour as I did so. It was ten o’clock. This was the call that Bridget usually took from the woman known in the book as Mrs Cuthbertson and as she spoke her name, I remembered how I had heard it on Bridget’s lips exactly one week ago when she had stood in the hallway and answered the telephone just as I was now. As I had suspected, the woman who had visited me in the kitchen and the woman Bridget listed in the book were the same.
‘With whom am I speaking?’ she said, but the words had a tone to them which made me unsure whether she wanted an answer or just to know that someone was listening and ready to take orders.
‘This is Nurse Watts at the Missensham Cottage Hospital Nurses’ House,’ I said, but my greeting seemed to be a detail that did not matter to her.
‘I need someone up at Elmridge House today,’ she said. ‘As soon as you can, for I must attend a church service and my son cannot be left alone for long.’
Her voice was sharp and somehow I felt as if I was being scolded for breaking an engagement I did not know I had agreed to. I took a deep breath. ‘I am afraid that there are no nurses working at this time,’ I said. ‘If you have a medical emergency, I can telephone a doctor or ambulance for you, but if you require a routine visit from a nurse, you may telephone Dr Crawford at the surgery on the green and he can get you added to the rounds of the district nurse…’ but my last words were lost under her own as if they did not matter.
‘I cannot wait for the district nurse,’ she said. ‘This is a private appointment and I will pay you directly. I understood that a nurse would be free from duties at this time. I assume you are not on duty as you have answered this number.’
‘Well, I…’ I glanced at the clock again, but it told me only that it was a few minutes past the hour and not what time Bridget would arrive back. ‘All right,’ I said, reluctant to let down Bridget’s patient. ‘A nurse can come out to you this morning, but it will not be Nurse Bradshaw, for she has been called away unexpectedly. It will be me, Nurse Watts, and I—’
‘I shall need to leave Elmridge House on the half hour,’ she said, ‘so be prompt. It is on the Oxworth Road. I need you at half past ten, it will only take you half an hour, so you have sufficient notice, and don’t come smelling like a brothel this time.’
‘Please,’ I said. ‘I am not the nurse who—’
‘Oh, and be sure to bring the medicine.’
‘Which medicine?’ I said. ‘For I cannot bring anything that has not been prescribed by—’
But the line was already dead.
I put the receiver down and stared at my reflection in the mirror above the telephone table. I took off my cap and smoothed my hair back into a bun, then I removed my apron and belt, leaving just my blue dress. We were forbidden from wearing our uniform off duty, but the plain blue dress was the only thing I could imagine a private nurse wearing and I remembered how I had seen Bridget leave the nurses’ house without her cap and apron the previous Sunday. I sat on the floor next to my nursing bag. I checked the contents – everything was clean and replenished, but it was just the usual array of metal instruments, tubing and jars, and I did not know what else to take. Then I remembered the little bottle of Luminal and the caller’s insistence that I bring ‘the medicine’. Maybe now she had a prescription to show me – I would take some just to be sure.
I ran across the lawn and through the trees to the back of the hospital, passing a startled Violet as I barged through the back door. In the sluice room I found the key to the medicine cabinet under the kidney bowl and rummaged for the little glass bottle with the blue label among the packets and jars. I found the Luminal near the back. There were a few bottles and I fancied that one would not be missed and thought that I could always sign it out later if Mrs Cuthbertson did have a prescription to show me after all. Then I ran back to the nurses’ house to collect my bag and burst in through the kitchen door.
‘Nurse?’
A girl perched on the chair by the fire. She was barely bigger than a child and wore a floral print pinafore and a cardigan which seemed two sizes too big for her. By her feet was an old-fashioned wicker basket lined with straw and as many real eggs as I would usually see in a whole month.
Her face was not one that I had seen before and something about her made me think of an evacuee, although since the bombs had started to fall on the outskirts of London, Missensham was no longer considered a safe area and most evacuees had returned, which made me wonder if she had anywhere left to call home.
‘Can I help you?’ I asked impatiently. ‘For I must go out to a patient.’
‘I heard that you can do things for ladies in trouble,’ she said in a voice with more depth than I expected and I realised her a woman, but only just.
‘Oh!’ I said. ‘Yes, of course,’ but could manage nothing more. To see such a girl sat where I had seen so many others was a shock to me. I was more used to dealing with middle aged women who could not afford another mouth to feed, farmers’ wives fearing they had no strength left to carry another and women who were having flings with soldiers. That someone like her would come to me asking for help was something that I could not quite understand. Somehow she was in the same situation as these women, yet she was so unlike them.
‘Is this not the right place?’ she said. ‘For I heard that—’
‘Yes, yes,’ I said quickly. ‘Yes, this is the place, but surely it can’t be for yourself…’
She nodded. ‘There was this gentleman,’ she said, ‘and now I am late.’

***Don’t miss other bloggers on the blog tour & apologies for my late post***
The Secret blog tour poster (1)

Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview The Night Visitor by @PRedmondAuthor 5* Genius #NewRelease #CrimeFiction #Thriller #Horror @BooksManatee #NightVisitor

The Night Visitor Cover
The Night Visitor by Patrick Redmond
Review Copy
Synopsis:

When does a gift become a curse?

Meg has a gift. She can change lives. But when tragedy strikes in childhood she vows never to use it again.
Now an adult, she is living in Cornwall; a place where the elements themselves have a life of their own. When they call she refuses to listen, fearful of the dark places where her gift can lead.

But the dead will not be silenced. They are stronger than her. And now they have chosen she is powerless to escape…

My Review:

‘Until that dreadful day when everything changed’

The novel opens in Suffolk 1991, with sisters Meg (6yrs) and her little sister Grace and their mother Becky. They are in a café, a seemingly innocent day out. When Meg utters some simple words to widow, Edith Harris. This scene sets the tone for the novel and you instantly become aware there is so much more to Meg than meets the eye.

The novel then fast-forwards to 1992 and Meg is now at Wickenham primary school she is often taunted and bullied by the other children. We begin to learn that due to Meg’s visions/premonitions, she is treated as an outcast. She has a bullying teacher in Mrs Fisher and her classmates are quick to join in. For poor Meg life is tough; handling her visions and the shunning of her peers.

‘Please God, don’t let me ever see anything bad about my mum’ – Meg

Then novel progresses over Meg and Grace’s childhood and we learn that it was one of much suffering. The ultimate suffering for Meg is the tragic death of her beloved mother. Which sets Meg’s life on a unique course and ensures her refusal to ever accept her father’s new wife. The scenes are extremely moving and emotive, the girls plight is fully explored; and I must admit you grow to really admire Meg and her defensive stance.

‘Meg would never allow herself to trust anyone ever again’

Meg decides in order to live a happy fulfilled and ‘normal’ life it is best to close herself off to her visions and block them out. A decision she is determined to live by. . .

‘The dead couldn’t reach her. Not anymore. Her barriers were too firmly in place and none of them would ever break through and trick her again.
None but one’

The novel then jumps to 2017 Cornwall, where we are reunited with a now adult Meg. She is taking a break from her tough job at a prestigious law firm; on the West Coast of Cornwall. She slowly becomes friends with her neighbour Dan. But we also become aware Meg is deep in grief after the death of her sister Grace four months ago. Meg comes across as paranoid at moments but a lifetime of grief and emotional pain, can take its toll. She slowly opens up to Dan about Grace and even befriends some of the locals.
Then the nightmares begin. . . .

‘Only by facing it can you hope to conquer fear’

There are a series of unusual encounters, that force Meg to explore her own painful past and the local Cornish history. What she uncovers will lead to shock revelations.

I have enjoyed previous novels by this author and this one does not disappoint. The characterisation of meg is brilliant, as you the reader become drawn into her personality and story. The ending is beautifully written and clearly shows the skill of the delivery of a well-planned novel.
Expect the unexpected 5* genius

PR
Patrick Redmond
Website
Twitter

***Don’t miss the other bloggers on the blog tour***
banner

Anne Bonny #BookReview A House Of Ghosts by @WilliamRyan_ 5* Genius #WW1Fiction #Séance #Ghosts #Mystery #Thriller @bonnierbooks_uk @BonnierZaffre ‘A House Of Ghosts is pure perfection!’

cover
A House Of Ghosts by W.C. Ryan
Review Copy
Synopsis:

Winter 1917. As the First World War enters its most brutal phase, back home in England, everyone is seeking answers to the darkness that has seeped into their lives.

At Blackwater Abbey, on an island off the Devon coast, Lord Highmount has arranged a spiritualist gathering to contact his two sons who were lost in the conflict. But as his guests begin to arrive, it gradually becomes clear that each has something they would rather keep hidden. Then, when a storm descends on the island, the guests will find themselves trapped. Soon one of their number will die.

For Blackwater Abbey is haunted in more ways than one . . .

My Review:

A House Of Ghosts is pure perfection!
It has several themes that I absolutely adore and some that strike at my heart. It covers a multitude of genre’s it is literary, historical with a slight occult theme also. It really is 100% worth your investment in the beautiful hardback edition. *See images below*

The novel centres around several characters, mostly of the upper class and privileged of society. But as we know from history, this alone did not absolve you from the battle lines of The Great War. The novel is set in the winter of 1917 and you can fully appreciate the psychological impact of ww1 on several of the characters.

This struck very personal to me, as my great-grandfather fought in ww1 and came back having received a severe head injury. Eventually, he took his own life years later. I guess we will never truly know if it was the head injury, the psychological trauma of a mixture of both. But all I do know is he took his life via slitting his own throat and my grandfather was the one to find him at just 10yrs old. His death would leave a substantial impact on one of the greatest men, I’ve even known, my Grandad Alan.

Back to the novel itself, the central characters are Cpt Robert Donovan and Kate Cartwright. When they are summoned to Blackwater Abbey to take part in a séance to summon the dead of ww1. They have no idea, they’ll end up becoming amateur detectives themselves. The characterisation of these two is phenomenal and they work brilliantly together. What we are yet to discover, is that Kate has a gift of her own. . .

‘Any supposed contact with the dead is either the work of charlatans or some kind of group psychological disorder’ – Kate Cartwright

We learn more about each individual character present at Blackwater Abbey. Their ties to the estate and their loss of loved ones in ww1. Kate for example has lost her own brother and despite her reservations, she is desperate for some kind of communication or confirmation of his death.

‘The problem with corruption among the English upper classes wasn’t that it existed but thatg it wasn’t dealth with firmly and publicly’ – C

Blackwater Abbey is located on Blackwater island as island rumoured to be full of ghosts and the perfect location for a weekend of spiritualism and séances. That is until the stormy weather cuts the group off from access and contact with the mainland. . .

‘In a house of ghosts, the living await, their certain fate’

Eventually we are introduced to the two eccentric characters, that have been acquired to carry out the seances. Madame Freda and Count Dmitri Orlov. The séance will require 12 people and equal numbers of men and women, which requires two unwilling servants to join their number.

‘Spirits from the other side, join us’ Count Orlov

For me personally, this novel has it all. A haunted island, superstition, wartime secrets and trauma. Kate and Donovan make the perfect crime solving pair and the novel strongly reminded me of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None.
5* Genius

***images of Hardback edition***
cof cof
cof cof

WR
William Ryan ~ W.C. Ryan
Website
Twitter

Anne Bonny #BookReview The Lost Daughter by @GillPaulAUTHOR 5* Genius #NewRelease #HistoricalFiction #RussianHistory @headlinepg ‘It is a beautiful story of the hardships people can endure and their desire for a better life. A story of hope’ #TheLostDaughter

cover
The Lost Daughter by Gill Paul
Giveaway winner copy
Synopsis:

A Russian princess. An extraordinary sacrifice. A captivating secret…

From the author of The Secret Wife, a gripping journey through decades and across continents, of love, devastating loss and courage against all odds.

1918
With the country they once ruled turned against them, the future of Russia’s imperial family hangs in the balance. When middle daughter Maria Romanova captivates two of the guards, it will lead to a fateful choice between right and wrong.

Fifty-five years later . . .
Val rushes to her father’s side when she hears of his troubling end-of-life confession: ‘I didn’t want to kill her.’ As she unravels the secrets behind her mother’s disappearance when she was twelve years old, she finds herself caught up in one of the world’s greatest mysteries.

I was super lucky to win a very early proof via Twitter which came with a box of treats which I have to share……
cof cof cof cof

My Review:

When I opened this novel, it was so much more than I was expecting. It is a story of endurance, sacrifice and humanity, that spans the decades. It is undeniably moving and emotive. I shed so many tears. I cannot recommend this novel highly enough!

The novel centres around the plight of the Romanov family and specifically middle daughter Maria. It is set from 1918 onwards, when the Russian government turned against the aristocracy. I personally found that the novel struck at the chords of your heart by focusing on one family’s struggle to survive. There are obviously historical/political references and the accuracy is outstanding. But by keeping the focus on one family in particular, you begin to question the humanity of their situation. You begin to feel as though you are with the family in their struggle against oppression.

Maria’s father was a Tsar and her mother a Tsarina. Their titles entitled them to a life of luxury and wealth, that few Russian citizens had ever known. Commissar Avdeyev removes them from Alexander palace (their previous home) and places them under house arrest. They are forbidden to leave the house and are told they will be exiled. They spend 14 months as prisoners and begin to wonder when and how it will all end.

‘It’s more like a mausoleum in which we have been interred’ Anastasia

The novel focuses on the siblings, sisters Anastasia, Olga and Tatiana and brother Alexei. Maria is the chatty and inquisitive child, who dreams of marriage to a Russian officer. She is young and naïve, which shows when she decides to befriend the officers on guard. A situation she will later come to regret.

Under house arrest are the seven members of the Romanov family and several members of their staff. Eventually the staff are slowly stripped away; and the family must learn to fend for themselves without servants for their every whim. Which is more difficult for Alexei, who suffers from haemophilia and requires extra supervision. Tatiana is fearless and outspoken, she makes regular demands of Avdeyev.
She is also determined to find the family a way out.

Maria continues to befriend the guards and on her 19th birthday Ivan Skorokhodov even brings her a birthday cake. A luxury they have not been afforded in captivity. However, this simple act of kindness will have much greater repercussions when the commander and guards are all replaced.

‘He never looked directly at any of them; it was as if to him they were not human’

The new commander Yakov Yurovsky, allows his guards to make lurid comments towards the daughters and treat the family with utter contempt. When Maria mistakenly attempts to befriend guard Anatoly Bolotov, it will have a devastating impact on her future and emotional state.
Tatiana has a daring plan, but before it can be executed. . . .
The family are. . .

‘Tsar Nicholas Romanov guilty of countless bloody crimes against the people, should be shot’ Yurovsky

Maria is saved, but what will become of the young woman who trusts so easily. . .

The novel then jumps to its other narrative, the life of Val in 1973 Australia. Val has known a difficult childhood, with her Chinese mother walking out on the family. Leaving her to be raised by a cold and heartless father. She has been married to husband Tony for 18yrs and they have a daughter Nicole (3yrs).
But it is a marriage tainted by domestic violence control and fear.

Val receives a call from Sandy bay nursing home, where her aging father resides. They have been estranged for many years and he is not suffering with dementia. The staff inform her, he has been making wild claims and ask if she can shed any light on the meaning. . .

‘I didn’t mean to kill her’
‘There was so much blood’

The novel fully explores Val’s childhood and marriage. It also draws from the 1970s attitudes towards domestic violence; as something that can be justified and explained away. The only positive in her life, is her love for her daughter Nicole. Which gives her life a form of meaning. But when Tony crosses the line and physically disciplines Nicole. Val knows she has a choice to make.

The novel jumps between the narratives of Val and Maria. Weaving its magic through the decades. I was absolutely captivated by the story and couldn’t put the book down. There are so many themes, it is impossible for me to cover them all in one review. I think this novel is perfect for book groups and historical groups.

It is a beautiful story of the hardships people can endure and their desire for a better life. A story of hope. 5* Genius

GP
Gill Paul
Website
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

***Currently just 99p On Kindle Ebook***

Anne Bonny #BookReview Halcyon by @Rio_Youers 5* Genius #Halcyon #Horror @TitanBooks ‘It is that INTENSE!!!!! But it is AWESOME!’

cover
Halcyon by Rio Youers
My own copy
Synopsis:

Nightmarishly compelling and flawlessly told horror for fans of Paul Tremblay and Joe Hill.
Halcyon is the answer for all Americans who want to escape, but paradise isn’t what it seems. A beautiful self-sustaining community made up of people who want to live without fear, crime, or greed, Halcyon is run by Valerie Kemp, aka Mother Moon, benevolent and altruistic on the outside, but hiding an unimaginable darkness inside. She has dedicated her life to the pursuit of Glam Moon, a place of eternal beauty and healing. And she believes the pathway there can only be found at the end of pleasure.
On the heels of tragedy, Martin Lovegrove moves his family to Halcyon. A couple of months, he tells himself, to retreat from the chaos and grind. He soon begins to suspect there is something beneath Halcyon’s perfect veneer and sets out to discover the truth, however terrible it might be, behind the island and its mysterious founder.

My Review:

I became aware of Rio Youers via the social media posts of Christopher Golden. I then saw a blurb on Halcyon from one of my author faves Sarah Pinborough. So, I knew I HAD to have this novel. I knew it would be dark and it is well, well, well, with the remit of the horror genre. But crikey bobs was I ill prepared! There were moments of just having to put it down, simply because it is so intense.
I also found myself re-laying the whole plot to my husband (he is a non-reader, I know, it is gross! Lol). My husband was in complete agreement with me, that this would make an incredibly sinister horror movie.
There are moments where it briefly reminded me of the TV show the American Horror Story and also elements of the true crimes of Charlie Manson.
It is that INTENSE!!!!! But it is AWESOME!

The novel opens with 10yr old Edith Lovegrove and her sister Shirley (15yrs). We become aware Edith is experiencing extreme night terrors. Her parents are unsure if this is a phase or if there is something more sinister to this. I immediately suspected that she was gifted, but is this a talent for good or bad?

‘The man with no hands is crying’ – Edith

There is a backstory of Garrett Riley, who will become the infamous ‘Buffalo Bomber’. We learn of his dark and troubled past and what made him perceptible to the brainwashing of a cult with an ulterior agenda etc.
When Edith’s parents watch footage of the bombing on live TV. They witness a man with no hands crying.
It is then, that they come to believe Edith may harbour a gift for premonitions.

They contact various psychics and mediums and attempt to understand the world that Edith sees. But how do you navigate a world known for its charlatans and liars?
The Edith has visions of her mother’s death!!!!!!

Edith’s mother is the victim of a fatal school shooting massacre. It is then that Martin Lovegrove, the girls now widowed father starts to become disillusioned with life in modern day America. He starts seeking alternative ways of existing and he seeks peace. Time to grieve and to heal.

‘A better America’

This is how Martin is lured to the island of Halcyon. A hippie commune that promises peace in a tranquil location away from the constraints of a modern day and the relentless sufferings etc.
As much as I did feel this was a ‘sanctuary or suicide’ mission. I could completely empathise with Martin’s need for escape. After all, who of us doesn’t just want to often retreat from the world and live in a cabin in the woods etc.
*We might feel safer in doing so, if we don’t take Rio Youer’s novels lol

At Halcyon there is a matriarch type character, called Mother Moon. Shirley instantly bonds with her and despite her initial reluctance accepts their new way of life. Edith however, is not so easily convinced. Is this her gift? Or her angst/jealousy? This is a young girl with no mother, now feeling she is losing her older sister to the leader.

‘Education develops a woman. Always. Tribulation is different. It can unravel her, or give her armour’ – Mother Moon

The idea is for an introduction period of six weeks at Halcyon and if they want to leave at the end, they can with no problems whatsoever. Something Martin doesn’t see a huge issue with. He is persistently warned via his friend Jimmy, about the reputation of such ‘retreats’. Nevertheless, the family arrive and become settled.

What happens at Halcyon, stays at Halcyon.
I will not be telling anymore, of this story! Just know that it is gripping and horror-filled!
When Mother Moon’s backstory is finally revealed, my jaw was on the floor!!!!!!
WOW, JUST WOW!
5* Genius

RY
Rio Youers
Website
Twitter