#BlogTour #Extract Chapter One – Hiding by @jmortonpotts @rararesources #NewRelease #Psychological

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Hiding by Jenny Morton Potts
Synopsis:

A gripping psychological thriller with chilling twists, from a unique new voice.

Keller Baye and Rebecca Brown live on different sides of the Atlantic. Until she falls in love with him, Rebecca knows nothing of Keller. But he’s known about her for a very long time, and now he wants to destroy her.

This is the story of two families. One living under the threat of execution in North Carolina. The other caught up in a dark mystery in the Scottish Highlands. The families’ paths are destined to cross. But why? And can anything save them when that happens?

Hiding - jenny
Jenny Morton Potts
About the author:
Jenny is a novelist, screenplay writer and playwright. After a series of ‘proper jobs’, she realised she was living someone else’s life and escaped to Gascony to make gîtes. Knee deep in cement and pregnant, Jenny was happy. Then autism and a distracted spine surgeon wiped out the order. Returned to wonderful England, to write her socks off.
Jenny would like to see the Northern Lights but worries that’s the best bit and should be saved till last. Very happily, and gratefully, settled with family.
She tries not to take herself too seriously.
Authors links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

Extract:

Chapter 1

Killer Road
April 2007

They died, Rebecca Brown’s mum and dad. They were killed on a road with a big reputation. Rebecca could only imagine it. She was hundreds of miles from the scene of the crash when it happened. When she thought of that road, she pictured it covered in ice, black ice, since the accident took place on a bitter December night. The A42, was the road’s alphanumeric name. The Killer Road, they called it back then in the papers. The Killer Road has struck again! The headlines came into Rebecca’s mind like a voice, like Vincent Price, as if the road arched up into vertical life, a tarmac monster stalking its victims.
Rebecca Brown was four years old when she became an orphan, alongside her sister, Colette, and her brother, Austen. Rebecca was the youngest. She couldn’t even remember the moment she was told. What had they said? ‘Mummy and Daddy have had a terrible accident, dear. In the car.’ At the time, she knew little more than the fact. They were gone. They’d been there all the days of her life, and then they were not. Of the circumstances and detail, she knew next to nothing. Perhaps Rebecca hadn’t thought to ask questions. Perhaps there was little more to say to a child so young. As Rebecca grew, though, so did her thirst for knowledge. But it seemed that, even if there had been a window of opportunity to make her enquiries, that window got bricked up years ago. There was a solid wall now between Rebecca Brown and the truth.
Julia and Stephen, her parents had been called. ‘Julia and Stephen,’ Rebecca liked to say aloud when she was alone in her garret bedroom. She could barely remember them but she thought they sounded really nice. She was sure that they were kind people, with ready smiles and lovely clean clothes.
It was their grandparents who raised the Brown children. It was the Grands who took the youngsters into their care at Taransay, a red sandstone mansion in the north of Scotland. Taransay was only partially restored. It had vast, austere rooms and draughty, wood-panelled corridors; a real Amityville Horror of a home, scary even on a cornflower sky summer’s day, and a weird contrast to the heavenly Highland surroundings. They lived high up on a plateau that could have been made for a view. There was an imposing tree-lined driveway and the steading, as Rebecca’s grandfather Ralph liked to call it, overlooked the magnificent Morar Sands. The golden beach met the Atlantic Ocean which unfurled itself like ruffled navy silk on the calmest of days, but the fierce ones were just as precious to Rebecca, as she stood at her dormer window looking out across the sea’s tossing and turning. She loved it best when the gods got angry down there in the depths and rose up, throwing the spray right at her face.
The land surrounding Taransay was mostly meadow, with the churn and splat of their cattle’s hooves and excretions. Their cowhand, Murdo Hendry, tended the animals. They had mostly Friesians but some Jerseys whose milk was creamier with more butterfat. And they had five Swedish Reds, the strongest and healthiest of the herd, and Rebecca’s personal favourites. They sold their high quality milk to a premium ice cream manufacturer but the income from such a small herd fell considerably short of supporting the Brown clan.
Murdo also tended a half acre of vegetable patch which their grandmother Primmy was inclined to call ‘the potager’. She was often found to use French substitutes for every day words. Austen told his younger sisters that this habit of their grandmother’s was part of her general denial and dislike of where they had ended up. He claimed that her French references were a deliberate barrier to assimilation. Primrose Anctillious Brown described herself as English to the core and it had not been her choice to relocate to Scotland.
The henhouse was Rebecca’s domain. They had a couple of dozen hybrid laying hens which produced far more than they could ever eat, so they supplied their excess to Moss Mills Nursing Home which made them all feel they were doing their bit for the community. However, the Browns were utterly insular and rarely met the community. It was Murdo Hendry – himself a man of very few words – who delivered the eggs.
The perimeter of their land was marked with stone dyke walls, upon which Rebecca could balance, even on the windiest of days. She was certain that this was a skill which would be good for something.
In many ways, the Browns were living in paradise, albeit a rather unpredictable one weather-wise. The blot on the landscape was really the house which was such a strange hulking abode. There was barely a smooth exterior surface. The builder had lumped on every possible feature: turrets, balconies, oriels, buttresses, corbels and a dozen chimneys. And all of the downstairs windows had metal bars fitted on the outside. Not the pretty ones you get in Spain, but the kind you get in gaol. Taransay looked more like a Rhenish correctional facility than a family home. No, this abode was not for the faint-hearted and yet the bereaved children were brought to its huge oak door, for re-settlement; like little refugees with their suitcases and their sorrow.
The rambling, shambling, freezing house was often cited as the reason that guests could not join them. They had moved into the sprawling mansion after the accident, so that there would be room for all of them. And there certainly was. A small regiment would have found it spacious. The house was only partly restored and some years into their tenure, it had become obvious that not only would Taransay never be finished whilst under their guardianship but that nobody had the slightest ambition to try.

#BlogTour #Review #Killed by @EngerThomas #HenningJuul 5* @OrendaBooks @annecater #CrimeFiction #NewRelease

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Killed by Thomas Enger – A Henning Juul novel
Translated by Kari Dickson
Synopsis:

Crime reporter Henning Juul thought his life was over when his young son was murdered. But that was only the beginning…

Determined to find his son’s killer, Henning doggedly follows an increasingly dangerous trail, where dark hands from the past emerge to threaten everything. His ex-wife Nora is pregnant with another man’s child, his sister Trine is implicated in the fire that killed his son and, with everyone he thought he could trust seemingly hiding something, Henning has nothing to lose … except his own life.

Packed with tension and unexpected twists, Killed is the long-awaited finale of one of the darkest, most chilling and emotive series you may ever read.
Someone will be killed. But who?

My review:

This novel has a deeply layered plot. The central theme is a criminal enterprise with a long reach across Norway! A drug empire, nonchalant in its criminal endeavours and relentless killings. It really had the feel of a Norwegian Narcos and would make an AMAZING TV series!!!!!

I loved the way the plot is told from a variety of perspectives. This helped in keeping track of all the characters and key players in the gang. Henning Juul is a great protagonist. A broken man in profound emotional and psychological pain. I liked his character instantly and wanted him to get the justice, he so desperately seeks. But with Henning, nothing is ever straight forward…….

The novel opens with a prologue that matches the cover. Which I think is brilliantly done by the publishers. It sets the tone as dark, eerie and complex! I couldn’t wait to explore the novel further.

I am new to the series, so I had to catch up at a rapid speed. The novel explains the previous case Henning has investigated; and what led this investigative journalist to have a hit on his head. The attempt on his life, left his young son dead and Henning with a whole world of questions!
Questions that drive him further and further into harm’s way.

The case involves criminals, who’s criminal activity reaches as far back as the 1990s. The general consensus is that if you take on this gang. You and everyone you hold dear, will end up dead! But with Henning’s son already dead. His wife pregnant by another man, Henning has little left to lose. So begins his investigation….

Henning wears the scars of his previous run-in with the gang. He suffers from memory loss and he has been green-lit to be killed. But this only fans the flames of his desire for vengeance. Throughout the novel he receives tip-offs and pieces of information, some that lead very close to home. Yet the people closest to him, seem to be holding back on the part they played, in the death of his young son.

The criminals in the novel are brilliantly portrayed. The secret identities add to the mystery and intrigue. They are ruthless in their determination to wipe out all that leads to Henning. Forcing Henning to a safe house and to use a secret coded system to communicate with informants. You are left under no illusion, if you cross this gang, it spells one word……..Death!

The perfect crime fiction read for fans of Narcos and The Girl With The Dragon tattoo. 5*

TE
Thomas Enger
Authors links:
Website
Via Orenda Books
Facebook
Twitter

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#BlogTour #Review The Betrayal by @AnneAllen21 #WW2Fiction #HistoricalFiction #Guernsey @rararesources #KindleOffer #EbookDeal

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The Betrayal Cover LARGE EBOOK (1)
The Betrayal by Anne Allen
The Guernsey novels – Book 6 
Synopsis:

Treachery and theft lead to death – and love

1940. Teresa Bichard and her baby are sent by her beloved husband, Leo, to England as the Germans draw closer to Guernsey. Days later they invade…

1942. Leo, of Jewish descent, is betrayed to the Germans and is sent to a concentration camp, never to return.

1945. Teresa returns to find Leo did not survive and the family’s valuable art collection, including a Renoir, is missing. Heartbroken, she returns to England.

2011. Nigel and his twin Fiona, buy a long-established antique shop in Guernsey and during a refit, find a hidden stash of paintings, including what appears to be a Renoir. Days later, Fiona finds Nigel dead, an apparent suicide. Refusing to accept the verdict, a distraught Fiona employs a detective to help her discover the truth…

Searching for the rightful owner of the painting brings Fiona close to someone who opens a chink in her broken heart. Can she answer some crucial questions before laying her brother’s ghost to rest?

Who betrayed Leo?

Who knew about the stolen Renoir?

And are they prepared to kill – again?

My review:

The novel moves between two timelines the present day 2011 and the World War 2 era, with both located at the beautiful Channel Island of Guernsey.
I love coastal crime novels and the WW2 era, so this was a combination, I knew I would enjoy.
I live on a Channel Island and although I haven’t visited Guernsey yet! I have visited Jersey and its many tourist sites in relation to the German occupation. So, it was easy to visualise the setting and atmosphere that such a novel generates.
The author has brought Guernsey alive on the page.

The novel opens in June 1940, as Theresa and baby daughter Judith are being evacuated from the Island fearing a German attack. Guernsey and Jersey were de-militarised in the build up to the war. The only channel island, that I know of that wasn’t, was the Isle Of Wight. As the British feared if the Island fell into German hands, they’d effectively be able to launch their own D-Day assault on Britain.
I loved the historical accuracy and at times I could get a real feel for the characters helplessness. They had no idea what their future was, once the Germans invaded.

The novel then jumps to the modern day of 2011. There is a robbery turned fatal attack at a local antiques shop. Which leaves Nigel dead and the motives unknown. What was the assailant attempting to steal? Nigel and his twin sister Fiona moved to the Island after Nigel’s diagnosis of MS. They sought out a calmer, carefree existence. But what they uncovered, had roots reaching far back into the past……

In 1940, Teresa separates herself from husband Leo, as the ship leaves Guernsey. Neither of them knows what the future can hold and if they’ll even ever see each other again. I found this heart-breaking to read and it really brought home the deep emotional pain many withstood in this era of history.

“I shall miss you more than you can ever know, my darling” – Leo

In the modern day, Fiona returns to the antiques shop, only to discover the body of her brother. Nigel is found hanging and with his recent medical diagnosis; the police are quick to assume suicide. But Fiona is steadfast in her belief that he would never abandon her and cause her such pain and grief. She is determined to prove the police wrong and so begins her own investigation. With the help of ex-copper turned PI John Ferguson, Fiona sets out to uncover the truth in the mystery.

I would describe this novel as cosy ww2 crime fiction. Although the plot revolves around a murder. It focuses more upon the impact this murder has on the characters, both past and present. The reflective chapters offer an insight and comparison into the ww2 era and the modern day. Leo’s perspective of the German invasion and his shocking betrayal, is brilliantly written. I wish the novel had covered more scenes from the ww2 timeline and in-particular Leo’s story. But the emphasis is mostly from the 2011 perspective, searching for the truth via the history of the island.

The location of St Peter Port, really adds to the novel. The theme of betrayal works incredibly well. Who can you trust, when everyone turns informer, in order to survive?
I would definitely LOVE to read more in the series and will be downloading the authors work via kindle unlimited asap!

Iphoto for email
Anne Allen
Author Bio –
Anne Allen lives in Devon, by her beloved sea. She has three children, and her daughter and two grandchildren live nearby. Her restless spirit has meant a number of moves which included Spain for a couple of years. The longest stay was in Guernsey for nearly fourteen years after falling in love with the island and the people. She contrived to leave one son behind to ensure a valid reason for frequent returns.

By profession, Anne was a psychotherapist, but long had the itch to write. Now a full-time writer, she has written The Guernsey Novels, six having been published and the seventh, The Inheritance, is due out in 2018
Authors links:
Website
Facebook
Twitter

****A Triple Celebration and a Price Reduction!****

For this week only, until 18th February, the price of books 2-6 of The Guernsey Novels is only £1.99/$2.99, with book 1, ‘Dangerous Waters, remaining at 99p/99c

This is in celebration of Anne Allen’s birthday, the 6th anniversary of the publication of ‘Dangerous Waters’ and the recent publication of book 6, ‘The Betrayal’.
#CheckOutTheOffer

Still unsure, check out the other #BlogTour reviews on the following #Blogs
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Link to #BlogTour #Giveaway

 

 

#BlogTour Chapter 3 #Extract Unconvicted by @OllyJarviso @canelo_co

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Unconvicted by Olly Jarvis
Synopsis:

In a razor-sharp legal thriller, Jack Kowalski must win two challenging trials to save his reputation and his career

Junior barrister Jack Kowalski is crushed. His client Timothy Smart appears to have committed a monstrous crime while on bail – a bail application Jack fought hard to win.

When a high-profile Polish footballer is charged with rape and demands a fellow countryman represent him, Jack must overcome his guilt and get back to work. Before long he takes on a second case, a GBH for instructing solicitor Lara Panassai, who Jack remains desperate to impress. But neither case is what it seems, and Jack will face an extraordinary uphill battle to see that justice is done…

The second Jack Kowalski novel, Unconvicted is a gripping courtroom drama written with the expert insight of a practicing criminal barrister, perfect for fans of William L. Myers, Deborah Hawkins, and Scott Turow.

Chapter 3 #Extract:

Oblivious to the biting Mancunian wind, Jack walked down Quay Street with a spring in his step. He stopped outside chambers, touched his name on the list of members and smiled to himself. Jack Kowalski was finally a tenant at Century Buildings. He ran up the steps, two at a time, then turned left into the clerks’ room.
‘Ah, Mr Kowalski. How are we today?’ asked Bob as he watched chambers newest tenant take off his coat.
‘Fine, thanks. Speeches at half ten in my burglary trial.’ He reached into his pigeonhole. ‘What’s this?’
‘It’s a bail application in a rape, sir. On the missus. A favour for your old pupil-master – Mr Huntsman’s part heard in Liverpool. You’ll look after it, won’t you?’
Bob’s politeness didn’t fool Jack. Nobody refused the senior clerk.
‘A rape?’
‘You’ll be all right, sir. The solicitor is Ken Dobkin. He knows you haven’t got a prayer. It’s just to keep the punter ’appy. You’re on at ten.’
‘But I need to be done for my trial at half ten.’
‘It won’t take long, sir, client won’t be there, banged up in Strangeways.’
Jack looked at his watch. ‘That’s in twenty minutes! When am I supposed to read it?’
‘Walking to court, of course.’
Jack registered his disapproval with a glare.
‘Well, get a move on, sir!’
‘Just this once, then, and only because it’s for Mr Huntsman,’ said Jack as he left the clerks’ room.
‘Oh, of course, sir,’ replied Bob, winking at the junior clerks. ‘Anyway, you should be thanking me. If you’d had the brief yesterday you’d have spent all night on it.’ Bob got out of his chair and followed Jack as he hurried out onto the street. ‘Carry on the way you are, sir, and you’ll be doing your own rape trial before you know it!’
Turning the corner, Jack raised an arm in triumph.
Walking back into the clerks’ room, Bob announced: ‘I do like that boy.’

OJ
Olly Jarvis
Twitter

Author bio:
Olly Jarvis is a writer and criminal defence barrister, originally from London but now working in Manchester. Drawing on his experiences, he writes both fiction and non-fiction with a particular understanding of the pressures and excitement of life in the courtroom. He wrote the highly acclaimed Radio 4 drama Judgement, and wrote and presented the BBC documentary Mum Knows Best. He is also the author of Death by Dangerous. Olly has two children and lives in Cheshire.

***Don’t miss the other bloggers on the #BlogTour this week***
Unconvicted Blog Tour (5)

#BlogTour #Review A Darker State by @djy_writer 5* @BonnierZaffre @bonnier_publish #NewRelease #CrimeFiction #Germany #1970s

Happy publication day David Young!

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A Darker State by David Young
Synopsis:

For the Stasi, it’s not just the truth that gets buried . . .

The body of a teenage boy is found weighted down in a lake. Karin Müller, newly appointed Major of the People’s Police, is called to investigate. But her power will only stretch so far, when every move she makes is under the watchful eye of the Stasi.

Then, when the son of Müller’s team member goes missing, it quickly becomes clear that there is a terrifying conspiracy at the heart of this case, one that could fast lead Müller and her young family into real danger.

Can she navigate this complex political web and find the missing boy, before it’s too late?

My review:

For the Stasi. It’s not just the truth that gets buried . . .

Under the secrecy and fear of a communist state, a murderer lurks. The prologue opens with one armed Polish dog walker Kazimierz Wojcik; stumbling across, the rat covered dead body of a young male, in a dark lake. It is within this terrifying political climate, that the man, even fears calling in the dead body to the police….

‘Keep you head down; keep out of trouble. That’s how Kazimierz had survived all these years, and he wasn’t about to change’

It is an eerie prologue that really sets the tone and pace of this historical novel. The author has done an outstanding job, of bringing 1976 East Berlin alive!
The novel is set within six months of 1976. With alternate chapters alternating the various months. The novel has many factual and historically accurate references. But the central theme is the skilfully woven, crime fiction plot.
One dead boy and another missing.
Things are about to get difficult for tough police major Karin Muller…….

Karin Muller is the newly appointed major of the serious crimes department in Keibelstrasse. Working alongside her deputy Werner Tilsner. Each having received double promotions. But is there more to this career fast tracking than meets the eye?

At the crime scene the pathologist quickly determines the body to have suffered fatal asphyxiation. There is a bizarre tattoo on the body and a sock stuffed down the throat of the victim. The police are left with more questions than leads.

The novel then jumps to six months previously. Where we meet Markus a bullied young student. We become aware that he is the son of a police man. He is helpless in his efforts to defend himself. Until one-day Oskar steps in and fends off the bullies. Having found a new and only friend, Markus believes his life is about to become a lot less lonely!

The body from the lake is finally identified as Dominik Nadel. Where the police officers believe his identification may throw up some clues. It only leads to further mysteries. Dominik appears to have led a sheltered life. He works at the local steel works and has hobbies such as football and a motorbike club. It is only when Karin appeals to the coach’s gentler side. Then he reveals crucial secrets surrounded Dom’s lifestyle and the motor bike club he is a member of…….

Karin’s personal life has changed, this is her first case back after her return from her twin’s birth. She is exhausted and blames herself for her long working hours away from her children. It is during this time, that the cracks begin to show in her relationship with Emil. He is distant and cold towards her. With everything Karin has going on, she does not even feel welcomed in her own home.

The case continues at a slow burning pace, but the alternative chapters keep you on your toes. We learn more about Dom’s activities prior to his death. Whilst also watching Markus fall in love for the first time.

The novel deals with some exceptionally moving themes. The manipulation of individuals, to achieve state goals. Also, the vile abuses a country can carry out on its own citizens. I think the author is very brave to address the concept within the historical era. It cannot have been an easy task.
But he has delivered a thought-provoking and complex 5* novel.

Karin Muller is an awesome protagonist and I look forward to the next novels in the Stasi series.

DY
David Young
Authors Links:
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