Anne Bonny #BlogTour #Extract – Prologue #DeadLock by @DamienBoydBooks #NewRelease #CrimeFiction #DINickDixon #Series @AmazonPub

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Dead Lock by Damien Boyd
#8 DI Nick Dixon Series
Synopsis:

Early on a cold Somerset morning, ten year old Alesha Daniels is reported missing by her father, a violent alcoholic. Her mother, a known drug addict, is found unconscious, but it’s her mother’s boyfriend the police are keen to trace.

As the hunt for Alesha gathers pace, a second local girl is taken, plunging another family into the depths of despair.

Cutting short his holiday, DI Nick Dixon races home to join the Major Investigation Team, but no sooner has he identified a network of local suspects than they begin to show up dead.

At odds with his superiors, Dixon is convinced the child abductions are anything but random, but nobody is prepared for the investigation to lead quite so close to home.
Can Dixon and his team crack the case before all the suspects are silenced? And will he find the missing girls before it’s too late?

Extract:

Prologue

Coal smoke. It was a familiar smell – comforting somehow – swirling in the fog of his dreams every morning when the crows dragged him back to his senses, even before he opened his eyes. Was it the same bloody lot following him along the cut these past several weeks? Sitting on the cabin roof every morning, squawking for all they were worth.
Mutton headed coveys.
He glanced across at Jack, fast asleep in his bunk. He was never up before dawn. It must be the grog. He reached over, picked up the jar and took a swig. Just the dregs. He grimaced.
Disgusting.
Tam’s bunk was empty, as usual when they reached Combe Hay. Selling coal to the lock keeper’s wife, no doubt. And more besides.
He slid his feet out from under Sikes, the smelly brindle Lurcher who kept them in rabbits in return for the scraps, and yawned.
Time to sort out Bess. Poor Bess. She comes first.
He slipped his feet into his boots and crept out of the cabin, finding the horse where he had left her last night, tethered to a tree along the towpath eating the wet grass, as far from the water’s edge as he could get her. She’d been in the canal again last week, but then it was Tam’s proven remedy for a buckled shoulder.
‘Works every time,’ he always said. ‘Get her in the water and let her swim it off. It’ll soon pop back in.’
It was happening more and more often these days. Poor old Bess. The old nag was starting to struggle to get the barge moving when it was full of coal.
All twenty ton of it.
He filled her nosebag with the last of the oats from the barrel and slipped it over her head. They should get to Paulton today and he’d make sure he filled it up good and proper for the return trip.
He left Bess eating her breakfast in the half light of the dawn and wandered back along the towpath towards the barge. He slid back the tarpaulin and dropped down into the empty hold as quietly as he could. It was either that or wake up Jack and get another basting for his trouble.
He picked up the last few bits of coal. The dregs.
Again.
One day he’d have his own boat – it was the life of a bargee for him – then there’d be no more dregs. For him, or Bess.
He tiptoed along the gunwale to the back cabin, trying not to rock the boat. Smoke billowed out of the stove when he opened the door, which explained why everything – and everyone – was covered in a thin layer of black dust. Coal safely in, he gave it a prod with the poker, closed the door and then placed the kettle gingerly on the top. Jack didn’t mind the whistle of the kettle if it was followed by a nice cup of ‘Rosie’, as he called it. And the stronger the better to mask the taste of the coal.
‘Nat, are you in there?’
He poked his head out of the back cabin to find Tam running along the towpath, doing up his belt as he ran.
‘Get Bess harnessed up, then get up to the next lock. It’s against us.’ Tam was banging on the side of the cabin with his fist. ‘Get up, Jack. We need to get moving. I’ll meet you at the top of the flight.’
Then he watched Tam disappear through a gap in the hedge and sprint off across the field.
Lock keeper on your tail again, is it?
Here we go again, Bess.
Nosebag off, harness on. Then he ran along the towpath to the next lock. They had stopped for the night in the middle of the flight so it was only a short dash. He closed the top gate and then ran back to the bottom gate to open the paddles, emptying the water from the lock.
First the nearside, then across the top of the gate to the offside. With both paddles open the lock would empty twice as fast.
He looked back to the barge. Jack was already getting Bess moving. Easier for the old girl today, with no cargo on board.
He glanced down at the top of the gate as he cranked the windlass lifting the nearside paddle, the water swirling as it roared out through the opening. The gate was crumbling and split where it had been rammed by barges coming into the lock too fast over the years, the splintered wood just visible through the piles of wet leaves lying along the top.
He could step over them.
It’d be no bother.

DB
Damien Boyd
Website
Twitter

***Don’t miss the other bloggers on the blog tour***
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Anne Bonny #BookReview The Boy Who Saw by @simontoyne 5* #CrimeFiction #Thriller #KindleDeal @HarperFiction @fictionpubteam ‘This novel is phenomenal, I opened the pages and fell into the story 100%’

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The Boy Who Saw by Simon Toyne
My own copy from tbr pile
Synopsis:

A MURDER
An elderly tailor is found tortured and murdered in the ancient town of Cordes. Written in blood beside the body are the words: FINISHING WHAT WAS BEGUN.

A SECRET
But the dead man has left a cryptic message for his granddaughter and her son, Leo – one that puts them in immediate danger.

A RACE
They are forced to go on the run, accompanied by the enigmatic Solomon Creed. What began as small-town murder becomes a race to uncover a devastating secret dating from World War II. The few men who know the truth are being killed by a powerful organization, and only one man stands in its way.

Only Solomon Creed can stop the murders.
Only he can save the boy.

My Review:

This is one of those novels that is so much bigger than its synopsis! I am new to Simon Toyne and the Solomon Creed series, but I am well and truly awoken now!
The novel is an impressive read and I look forward to further novels in the series.
I’ll definitely be keeping my eyes peeled for future releases.

The novel opens with Josef Engel being brutally tortured and murdered. The murder is quite graphic, and savage and you begin to wonder what has enraged someone so much that they want to eradicate Josef’s existence completely. The killer taunts Josef that he should have been killed in the past and it is well-known Josef is a holocaust survivor. The killer finishes by cutting a star of David into Josef’s chest and you are left under no illusion about the depravity of this killer.

‘Josef had not been this afraid since the war, when pain and death had been commonplace in the labour camps’

We are then briefly introduced to Solomon Creed at Madjid Lellouche’s property. It is an unusual meeting and difficult to describe. But it gives you a firm indication of Solomon’s character and how he will continue to come across on the page.

Commandant Benoit Amand of the police nationale is at the scene of vandalism. A swastika has been written on a Jewish memorial. He is disgusted by the crime, as he glances at the nearby banners celebrating 70yrs since the end of ww2.
He is deep in thought about who in the town would have done such a thing, when he is alerted that Josef Engel has been found murdered in his nearby shop.

Solomon is following vague clues, such as a label on his suit with an address in Corde-Su-Ciel. Solomon’s reasoning for memory loss is explained further on in the novel and makes for intense reading. But I loved the way the character was self-assured as he followed vague cryptic clues. Especially as that is exactly how you could summarise the man himself. I have never read a protagonist quite like Solomon before.

The novel is scattered with the real-life accounts of the holocaust written by Herman Lansky. They make for shocking reading and the harsh cruelty of the holocaust is brought alive on the page. But is Josef’s murder linked to the past? If so how?

‘The souls of the damned had been reclaimed’

Marie-Claude is Josef’s granddaughter and she has recently began to research her grandfather’s history. Beginning with the Die Schnider Lager – The Tailors Camp. She knows her grandfather was one of four individuals that somehow survived their death sentence and she is determined to track the other survivors down. This is a course of action that will have huge ramification for Marie-Claude and her young son Leo.
A course of action Josef warned her against.

‘We known that knowledge is sometimes a curse. And you can never unlearn something once it is known’ – Josef Engel

Amand receives an Interpol alert warning that Solomon Creed is highly intelligent and extremely dangerous. An alert that unravels Solomon’s past history and care under Dr Magellan. We also become aware Solomon’s headed straight towards Marie-Claude and that her and Leo are in great danger. A letter she holds and the suit Solomon wears are somehow linked to the recent murder. Marie-Claude knows she must do as her grandfather instructed and deliver the letter.

‘Do not trust this task to anyone. You must deliver it yourself’ – Josef Engel

The chapters from the perspective of Herman Lansky offer a glimpse into history and a stark reminder of the dangers of hate and fascism.
‘Only now, looking back, do I realise that Samler was not a man at all. He was something else, something that looked human but had no soul. A devil in a beautifully cut uniform’
The man he describes is Artur Samler, one of the Nazi high command. Samler ran the first camp to use a crematorium and was involved in the fuel machines program.
Yet I was growing more and more intrigued to learn how the past fitted into murder of Josef Engel. I found myself racing through the pages, not able to read quick enough!

‘If Die Schnieder Lager was hell, then Samler was the devil. And death was his command’ – Herman Lansky

Herman Lansky published his memoirs in 1949, living in Britain at the end of the war. He was found dead in a case of ‘misadventure’ after he was gassed during a fire. Everything ties back to a horrific memory of the holocaust, and the scars the men carry both physically and mentally.

The police continue their investigations, but they are slow on the uptake as they endeavour to uncover Solomon’s background first.
We become aware of a fascist modern-day group that are somehow tied to the case and seeking revenge on Marie-Claude. Leaving Leo is grave danger.
Can Solomon protect him?

The fascist group in question is the PNFL – similar to the BNP in their demand and ‘cause’ if you can even call it that. This part of the novel is incredibly timely with the rise in Nazi ‘sympathy’. However, it becomes very clear that the greatest danger is a lack of education, ignorance and manipulation. That is how these groups operate and sustain their membership.
‘You needed a police state, and a strong hand. A dictatorship. Democracy didn’t work because most people were stupid’ – Jean Baptise
Yet again the most ignorant and intolerant are usually the loudest!

This novel is phenomenal, I opened the pages and fell into the story 100%. The backstory of the holocaust and ww2 is not only insightful but historically accurate.
The writing is powerful and reflective to modern day politics. 5*

ST
Simon Toyne
Website
Twitter

***The Ebook in currently on Kindle deal for just £1.99 in the UK***

Anne Bonny #BookReview The Power Of The Dog by @donwinslow #AmericanNoir #CrimeFiction #Mexico #Cartels #DEA “A fantastic insight into the real ‘war on drugs’”

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The Power Of The Dog by Don Winslow
My Own copy from TBR mountain
Synopsis:

Drug lord Miguel Angel Barrera is head of the Mexican drug federación, responsible for millions of dollars worth of cocaine traffic into the US and the torture of those who stand in its way. His nephew, Adan Barrera, is his worthy successor.

Art Keller is a US government operative, so determined to obtain revenge for a murdered colleague that his pursuit of the cartel veers dangerously towards an obsession outside the law. This is a world characterised by its brutality, yet all Winslow’s incredibly varied cast – including a high class prostitute, an Irish hitman and a charismatic Catholic priest – are all in their own ways searching for salvation.

My Review:

I don’t quite know where to begin with this review. The novel is so in-depth and detailed about the cartel lifestyle and Mexican/American political systems that enabled it. It that it is incredibly hard to breakdown. The characterisation is brilliant, the author slowly builds the characters up as the plot unravels. You are left under no illusion what an immensely tough job it must be to enforce DEA law and attempt to stop the cartel’s flow of drugs. Not only are the police facing a criminal network that spans the globe and is savage and violent in its approach. But they also face dirty cops, bribed officials and people who would put themselves above the good of the country and its citizens.

‘A lot of money goes into bribes.
silver or lead’

The prologue opens in El Sauzal, Mexico 1997. Art Keller our protagonist and US operative is at the scene of a violent and bloody murder. 19 bodies lay slain, including a mother and baby. The death toll is 10 men, 3 women and 6 children. The victims were lined up against the patio wall and shot, execution style. Some of the family members show signs of torture, leading the cops to believe this is gang/cartel related. One lone victim remains, who was forced to watch the violence take place.

The novel goes on to describe the various methods of torture for crime committed. For example, traitors are shot in the back of the head and informers in the mouth. Life is the cartel is far from easy.

‘El poder del perro’ – The power of the dog

From the start the novel has a violent and explosive opening. However, the novel does go on to detail various areas of Mexico, who is affected by the cartel trade which includes the poor and just trying to get by citizens. But it also covers the policing, how a multidisciplinary team approach is desperately needed. But no one trust each other.

Art Keller is new to Mexico at the opening of the novel, but the end he is accustomed to the harsh way of life/death the cartels live by. At the beginning he is suffering flashbacks from his tour in Vietnam.
I wondered myself, which would be worse war? Or the war on drugs?

The DEA has been in operation 2yrs and Nixon has recently declared his ‘war on drugs’ stance. This is as the same time Art find himself recruited from the CIA to the DEA. Art is an experienced soldier, but I believe at the beginning he was naïve at just how integrated the cartel structure is into everyday life. His boss Tim Taylor hates him, and he is isolated and alone in and new to Mexico. This is when he first meets Adan Barrera. . .

‘Years later, Art would have given anything in the world to have just killed Adan Barrera on the spot’

‘A partnership made in hell’ – Art Keller & Tio Barrera

There are a wealth of characters from Father Juan to Nora Hayden, it would be impossible for me to break down all the details of who fits into the plot and where, just know that each individual mentioned is relevant and they all play a part no matter how big or small in the formation of a divide.
Which will sit Art on one side of the fence and the cartel on another.

Art is also dealing with his own new marriage and personal problems. He is a complex character and there is so much more to Art than first meets the eye.

‘The only redemption for having a bad father is being a good one’

Art has adapted the motto YOYO aka you’re on your own. A motto that when dealing with the cartel will serve him well, as you never know who you can trust.

When Art’s colleague Ernie Hidalgo goes missing, all hell breaks loose the DEA will stop at nothing to return one of their own.

“If I have to. . . I’ll start a fucking war” – Art Keller

Adan Barrera’s character also evolves. He is quite the strategist and manages to ensure he is top-dog of the cartel empire. But how long can that last for?
And how quickly can you be taken down or killed?

Adan also has a daughter that suffers a rare genetic condition. He personally feels responsible for this and it causes a huge rift in his marriage. With both him and his wife, ready to accept full responsibility for the condition.

‘Neither god nor science can help his daughter’

The novel goes on to explain Adan’s rise within the organised infrastructure of the cartel drug trade.

‘Adan Barrera has reinvented the drug business’

The cartels are comfortable with the situation of buying the very police sent to stop them, they see it as a franchise, a business expense.

‘Just look the other way, be someplace else, see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil and the monthly payment will be there in full and on time’

The cartel trade runs into profits of $8million a WEEK, yes that is a WEEK!!!!!! It is easy to see that every man, woman or child just has a price tag attached. Except one man, Art Keller can not be bought and will not be put on the pay roll.
It just might be his downfall and he knows it. . .

‘He’s only sure that either he will kill Adan or Adan will kill him, and those are the only two ways this thing can end’ – Art Keller

This novel has a deeply layered plot, that covers politics, corruption, flow of drugs, cartel wars, deception and violence. The last 20% is very intense and sets the scene perfectly for the next novel in the series The Cartel. Which I already have sat on my tbr pile.
A fantastic insight into the real ‘war on drugs’.

DW
Don Winslow
Website
Twitter

Currently Reading – 35% in:
The Force
The Force by Don Winslow
Synopsis:

Everyone can be bought. At the right price…

Detective Sergeant Denny Malone leads an elite unit to fight gangs, drugs and guns in New York. For eighteen years he’s been on the front lines, doing whatever it takes to survive in a city built by ambition and corruption, where no one is clean.

What only a few know is that Denny Malone himself is dirty: he and his partners have stolen millions of dollars in drugs and cash. Now he’s caught in a trap and being squeezed by the FBI. He must walk a thin line of betrayal, while the city teeters on the brink of a racial conflagration that could destroy them all.

***Although I am reading this via kindle, I urge you to sample the audiobook. The narration is fantastic. In fact, so fantastic I actually own it in both kindle & audio.***

Anne Bonny #BookReview Hydra by @ConcreteKraken Matt Wesolowski #SixStories #CrimeFiction #Thriller #Suspense #Horror @OrendaBooks ‘such a bloody great book! 5*’

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Hydra by Matt Wesolowski – Six Stories #2
My own copy from my TBR mountain
Synopsis:

A family massacre
A deluded murderess
Five witnesses
Six Stories
Which one is true?

One cold November night in 2014, in a small town in the northwest of England, 21-year-old Arla Macleod bludgeoned her mother, stepfather and younger sister to death with a hammer, in an unprovoked attack known as the Macleod Massacre. Now incarcerated at a medium-security mental-health institution, Arla will speak to no one but Scott King, an investigative journalist, whose Six Stories podcasts have become an internet sensation.

King finds himself immersed in an increasingly complex case, interviewing five key witnesses and Arla herself, as he questions whether Arla’s responsibility for the massacre was as diminished as her legal team made out.

As he unpicks the stories, he finds himself thrust into a world of deadly forbidden ‘games’, online trolls, and the mysterious black-eyed kids, whose presence seems to extend far beyond the delusions of a murderess…

My Review:

I really enjoyed the authors first novel Six Stories, it was clear to see that it was a fantastic debut novel and the author clearly had a natural talent for storytelling. I think the author brings something young and edgy to the crime fiction genre. It maybe the use of technology and crime novel surrounding a podcast. But I happen to think it is the writing style and knowledge of certain aspects of true life horror phenomenon. For example, when the lift footage of Elisa Lam was mentioned, I was instantly reminded of who creepy it is and yet it remains an unsolved case!

This podcast with Scott King revolves around Arla Macleod. A young woman who massacred her entire family one evening with a hammer! Why did this meek young woman commit murder? What drove her to kill those closest to her?

‘We rake over old graves’ – Scott king

The podcaster is able to video interview Arla, from her confines of Elmtree manor. Just the very theme of Arla being detained under the mental health act, rather than serving a lengthy prison sentence is cause for mass media speculation. Did Arla getaway easily with her crimes? Was she even mentally ill?
These are all themes Scott king wishes to explore with his podcast.

This is what makes Wesoloski’s novels so unique. They force you to question and explore why people do commit violent crimes and their personal reasoning for doing so.

In the first episode we hear directly from Arla. Although certain subjects are forbidden from discussion at the staff’s request. We also learn about Arla herself, the crime and the victims she killed. Arla lived with her mother and stepfather Stanley and sister Alice. Her biological father was violent and abusive and it was Stanley that ‘saved’ the family as they fled from Scotland to Stanwel. Stanwel is described as your typical run-down northern town, where nothing ever happens. That is until a young woman takes a hammer to her parent’s heads.

‘Her life was lived under the law her parents imposed’

Arla’s parents were right-wing Christians with firm and steadfast beliefs on issues such as abortion and LGBT rights. Arla began to reject her parents values in her teens and this seemed to inflame their attitudes towards her. With her sister Alice becoming the preferred ‘favourite child’.
Something happened to Arla, that much is clear.
But what occurred that day at 41 Redstart Road, Stanwel?

“I let them in. I let them in” – Arla

Arla talks of visions of ‘black eyed kids’ BEK, an urban myth amongst young teens. It is unclear if the BEK caused her to further seek out other occult behaviour or she was already actively seeking it out. Needless to say Arla was fascinated by the occult and the notion of escaping her current life.

Arla’s background is further explored and the details of her psychosis diagnosis. Is Arla mentally ill? Seems to be a common question in the novel and schizophrenia is known to present itself in the late teens/early 20s. So, there is more than enough room for speculation. Which I think makes for fantastic reading.

I typically avoid novels with a mental health theme, as that was my previous occupation and I hate to see it misrepresented in a novel. Statistically mentally ill people are more likely to harm themselves than others and too often it is distorted to fit a narrative in a crime fiction novel. But this was not the case at all within Hydra. The mental health aspects were backed up with knowledgeable facts. The central theme remained focused on understanding Arla, not condemning her due to her illness.
I must admit I really respect the author for that. It could have been too easy, to delve off into a tangent of mental health and loose sight of Arla completely.

As Scott King continues to interview people from Arla’s past such as her former teacher, childhood friend and holiday buddy. We learn more and more about why Arla was the way she was. Why she became so meek and introverted. Her obsession with the band Skexxixx and occult practices, is all explored.
At the same time Scott begins to receive personal threats to cease and desist with his Six Stories podcast. But he refuses to back down to the threats of an online troll.
But this troll just won’t simply go away!

‘No one wants you when the world tells you that you’re not important, that you don’t matter, that you’re an inconvenience – some people start to believe it; they make themselves unlikable’ – Angel Mawson

The novel has so many talking points, as it incorporates real-life themes within the story. In a comparison from Arla to the killers of James Bulger, we are forced to ask why the media was so quick to condemn two 10yr old boys instead of asking why they did it? The band Skexxixx is forced to shoulder some responsibility for the violent crime. Almost as if listening to a specific type of music can turn you into a killer.
But I can remember the exact same approach being used against Marilyn Manson in the aftermath of the Columbine shooting.

Why are we so quick to cling to meaningless reasons in the aftermath of a violent crime? Instead of seeking to understand the individual that felt the violent crime was their only way out!

I write my reviews days after reading the books. As I sit here now, I keep reflecting,
‘this is just such a bloody great book’.
So, there you go, this is simply put – such a bloody great book! 5*

mw
Matt Wesolowski
Twitter
Orenda Books

Anne Bonny #BookReview Wrong Way Home by @IsabelleGrey 5* #CrimeFiction #Thriller #NewRelease @QuercusBooks A cornered predator is most dangerous of all. . .

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Wrong way Home by Isabelle Grey
Review Copy
Synopsis:

A cold case leads DI Grace Fisher on the hunt for the most dangerous killer of her career – but after twenty-five years, can she really be sure she will get to the truth?

The same night a local hero saved two people from the burning Marineland resort in Southend, a young woman was raped and murdered minutes from the scene of the fire, the culmination of a series of brutal rapes in the town. The killer was never found.

Twenty-five years on, new DNA techniques have blown the cold case open. DI Grace Fisher relishes the prospect of finally catching the culprit, but when the evidence doesn’t point to one clear suspect, she must reconstruct the original investigation. Any suggestion that the Essex force was less than thorough at the time could alienate her colleagues and destroy her chances of reaching the truth.

Grace finds her investigation shadowed by a young true-crime podcaster backed by veteran crime reporter Ivo Sweatman. As pressure mounts she cannot afford to be distracted. She knows that a cold-blooded killer is slowly being backed into a corner, and a cornered predator is often the most dangerous of all…

My Review:

The novel opens with Freddie Craig delivering his live podcast. The podcast entitled ‘stories from the fire’ focuses on the 1992 fire at the boarded up Marineland resort; and also a murder that took place that night. Heather Bowyer was just 19yrs old when she was raped and murdered at a nearby park. The media attention surrounding the fire and rescue of two local teenagers over-shadowed any focus on Heather’s case and she became quickly forgotten. The case remains unsolved and Freddie makes it his personal mission to unmask the killer. . .

‘Nobody knows. Or only one person, and he’s not telling’ – Freddie Craig

The novel then jumps to DI Grace Fisher, we are briefly introduced to the other members of the police team. But what is most fascinating, is that Grace has a lead on the Bowyer rape/murder case. Due to a DNA familial match, they have a drink driver from 2yrs ago with ties to whoever left DNA the night of Heather Bowyer’s murder. This could ultimately crack the case. Unbeknown to the rest of the team, Grace has linked this case to a potential 5 further rapes in Southend at that time.
Will Grace get the answers she so desperately seeks?

The novel also introduces Ivo Sweatman the chief crime correspondent at the daily courier. He was a young reporter at the time of the murder and reluctantly agrees to assist Freddie with his personal mission.

Grace tracks down the drink driver Deborah Shillingford. They ask about any living male relatives and explain how they would need to eliminate their DNA from the case. Deborah has two brothers Larry and Reece and her father is still alive. But there is something about Deborah’s plight that unnerves Grace. Why is she so accepting that the blame will fall to her? Why is she content to live a life of misery, almost in exile from all her family?

Meanwhile, Freddie’s podcast’s get more and more intense:
‘I want to know how it feels to live with the knowledge that every day might finally bring that knock on the door that will expose your whole life as a sham. I really want to meet this man and I bet I’m not the only one’ – Freddie Craig

Grace immediately assembles teams to take DNA from both Larry & Reece. It would seem the truth is finally about to be revealed. Then the novel takes a HUGE twist!
A fire breaks out at one of the potential suspects homes and throws the whole case into jeopardy.
This cold case, just hot a whole lot hotter…….

‘She knew all too well that true evil was never as simple as that’ – DI Grace Fisher

The characterisation of Grace, Freddie and Ivo, makes the novel so much more intense. Each has a different motive but the same ultimate goal. They all want to see justice for Heather Bowyer. Whilst some of the suspects conspire to conceal the truth.
Grace must deal with a case gone cold; in an era when rape victims weren’t believed or taken seriously at all.

As with all fantastic protagonists DI Grace Fisher continues to pursue justice despite the difficulties she faces unravelling the cold case. 5*

isabelle-grey
Isabelle Grey
Website
Twitter
My Review – The Special Girls