Anne Bonny #News from @ObliteratiPress #GuestPost by @daveocelot #DebutNovel The Baggage Carousel – Why I Travel. . . . .

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The Baggage Carousel by David Olner
Synopsis:

Dan Roberts has a troubled past, anger management issues and a backpack named after an abducted heiress. A chance encounter with Amber, a free-spirited Australian girl, seems to give his solitary, nomadic life a new sense of direction. But when she doesn’t respond to his emails, the only direction he’s heading is down…

Guest Post:

Why I Travel

It was Dumaguete, The Philippines. It was a Sunday morning and felt like it, hot and hardly worth bothering with. I was hanging out of my arse like a prolapse. Staring morbidly at a breakfast burrito in the outdoor seating area of a faux-Mexican cantina, poking it periodically with a fork in the hope it might deflate. Across the road, the snuffed-out neon signage of the “Why Not?” nightclub served as a dulled reminder of my most recent fall from grace. It takes a lot to get thrown out of a nightclub in the Philippines, but I had somehow managed it just a few hours earlier, for reasons I did not, or chose not to, recall.
The looped mariachi music scraping against my brain was punctuated by a beeping horn. I registered it dully at first, thinking the track was segueing into a mash-up. But when I looked up from my plate a Geordie bloke I vaguely remembered doing shots with the night before had pulled up on his scooter. He was wearing one of those striped blue and white t shirts that people always seem to wear when they ride scooters abroad. He looked entirely too healthy and well-adjusted to fit into my vista and I wanted to wave him off to one side, so I could better take a mental photograph of my latest, self-imposed hell.
“Howay, man,” he declared stereotypically. “I’m off to buy some pork. Landlady’s gonna make lechon. Wanna come?”
I looked at him, looked at the burrito and looked at the sign across the road.
“Why not?” I replied.
We got lost on the way, nearly hit some churchgoers who got to practice their genuflections early, only made it to the fabled pork district of the city when most of the carcasses had already been ravaged. Out of all the roadside stalls, the only thing left was a single pig’s head that smiled up at us beatifically, as though we had come to deliver it from the flies.
“This is the very best part of the pig for making lechon,” the stallholder insisted.
“How come it’s still here, then?” asked the Geordie.
The man shrugged and plucked a stray hair from the pig’s face, blew it from his finger and wished us away.
We paid for the head, like a lot of men do in the Philippines. Got lost again on the way back, ended up blocked in by a crowd of local blokes heading to the cockfight arena.
“Wanna go?” the Geordie, whose name I couldn’t and still can’t remember, asked.
“Why not?” I said.
We sat in the arena, pretending to savour warm, wet beers that made us dry heave, the men looking over at us and winking as they washed their cocks. Then we watched magnificent birds set against each other like gladiators in a manky coliseum, biting and scratching each other to near death to appease the bloodlust of these men. Between us, on the rough wooden bleachers, was a smiling pig’s face in a plastic bag. Throughout the slaughter I would set my hand upon it occasionally, to steady myself. As though I were a pensive Hamlet, regarding Yorick’s skull.
“How’s the head?” asked the Geordie.
“Fine,” I replied, not knowing if he was enquiring after the pig’s welfare or mine.
Whenever people ask me why I travel, this is the first thing I think of. But I don’t tell them about it. I think of something prettier. Angkor Wat at dawn, maybe, or that herd of elephants crossing the Luangwa river at sunset in Zambia. The young calf falling back, lost in the new joy of swinging its trunk in the shallow water, until an elder doubled back and hurried it along. That Sunday morning in the Philippines wasn’t the most edifying experience of my life. Looking back on it now, it was actually fairly horrendous. But it was about doing something different, something ludicrous, even. It was about inhabiting a particular moment in a particular place, a moment that couldn’t be replicated anywhere else. A moment you wouldn’t find if you stayed at home, binge-watching box-sets on Netflix and waiting for the Ocado driver to finally get out of his fucking van that’s been parked at the end of your driveway for ten minutes and is making your UPVC windows rattle to deliver the salted caramel lamb cutlets that Jan from work posted pictures of on Instagram and buying more and more things to better pad your beautiful cell. Saving all your money to upgrade that thousand-inch flat screen into a two thousand-inch curved screen and covertly praying they never invent a 360 screen. Money that could be much better spent pissed up a wall in a skanky nightclub in the Philippines, or on fly-blown pig’s heads or cockfights.
It was about saying, “Why not?”

DaveOlnerjPeg
David Olner
Obliterati Press website
Twitter

Anne Bonny #BlogTour A Known Evil by Aidan Conway #GuestPost @ConwayRome #NewRelease #CrimeFiction @KillerReads #DebutAuthor A serial killer stalks the streets of Rome. . .

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A Known Evil by Aidan Conway
Synopsis:

A serial killer stalks the streets of Rome…

A gripping debut crime novel and the first in a groundbreaking series, from a new star in British crime fiction. Perfect for fans of Ian Rankin.
A city on lockdown.
In the depths of a freakish winter, Rome is being torn apart by a serial killer dubbed The Carpenter intent on spreading fear and violence. Soon another woman is murdered – hammered to death and left with a cryptic message nailed to her chest.
A detective in danger.
Maverick Detective Inspectors Rossi and Carrara are assigned to the investigation. But when Rossi’s girlfriend is attacked – left in a coma in hospital – he becomes the killer’s new obsession and his own past hurtles back to haunt him.
A killer out of control.
As the body count rises, with one perfect murder on the heels of another, the case begins to spiral out of control. In a city wracked by corruption and paranoia, the question is: how much is Rossi willing to sacrifice to get to the truth?

#GuestPost:

The Not So Dolce Vita

by Aidan Conway

 

I sat down to begin writing A Known Evil on ‘blue Monday’ in January 2014. Setting out on a totally new and uncharted adventure seemed like a perfect way to keep any incipient blues at bay on the, allegedly, most depressing day of the year.
To the best of my recollection, up until then, I had never once considered writing a crime novel. I have always been a writer, in one way or another, on and off. My bottom drawer contains ample evidence of that – first, second and third drafts of short stories which might eventually also see the light of day.
But no crime. Poetry too, with which I had achieved a reasonable amount of success. But no serial killers, no thrillers, no intrigue.
So what inspired me? Around that time, on a friend’s suggestion, I had fallen back on reading some crime novels for pure, escapist pleasure.
Which might beg the question what was I escaping from? Rome has been my home since 2001 and before that for a brief period Sicily was too. Both places are breathtakingly beautiful, dramatic, unique, but problems there are aplenty.
Tourists continue to be drawn to The Eternal City in their droves to gaze at what I too marvelled at when I first came to the place. The mind-blowing museums, the Roman Forum, the Appian Way, the cobbled side-streets and cafes, the Bougainville and Jasmine scented air, warm summer evenings and cold white wine. The chatter and street theatre, the laid-back pace of life.
But then there is the dark side. The politics. The intrigue. The corruption and violence that most visitors will never have any cause to see or experience. The world of work. The problems of bureaucracy, and nepotism, favours, bribes and blackmail.
In Sicily one evening I witnessed a bomb go off, likely the work of extortionists. It never made the papers.
In Rome, when it snowed for a day in 2013, a regional councillor bought himself a 4×4, so he could ‘get around’, and all on party funds. Paid for by the tax payer. Paid for, in part, by me.
And why, for example, does it take two or three times as long to build a motorway in Italy than it does in France? Why does it cost three times as much? Who’s pocketing the spare change?
The Italian Court of Auditors has estimated that corruption costs the Italian economy some 60 billion Euros a year. That’s a lot of coffee and free lunches. I’d say it’s a conservative estimate.

Around the time I began the book, the first big immigration problem had also landed on the national agenda. It quickly became a ragged and soiled political football – scapegoating and blame were the order of the day. Real solutions seemed a secondary consideration. It wasn’t pretty.
I even got the odd dirty look or loaded comment when I walked into a shop and my accent wasn’t quite right. Politicians were exploiting it all and often getting away with murder. The credit crunch crisis too was biting hard. People were getting angry. So much for La Dolce Vita.
Neo-fascism too had got a shot in the arm as simple-minded nostalgia and cynical opportunism drew oxygen from what was happening in Rome and in the country as a whole. The political system was perceived as sclerotic, inefficient, ineffective and the media was in thrall either to the political parties and their cronyism or the megalomaniac ambitions of a small man from Milan who shall remain nameless.
On the positive side? At least the mafia weren’t doing much. Or were they? Cosa Nostra was keeping itself pretty much to itself (but it’s always there) while the Neapolitan Camorra and the Calabrian N’drangheta were the big kids who had burst on to the block as cocaine and gun-crime racking Naples and its suburbs spread northwards from its heartlands, following the money, following the power to Rome.
I realised I had plenty to write about. More than enough. In my work as a language consultant I had also had some access to the corridors of power, state bodies, multinationals. I got to sit down with CEOs, oil executives, undercover policemen, and maybe even some spies. You find people open up to you when you are an outsider and you are chatting one-to-one. And you’re cheaper than a psychiatrist. It can be illuminating.
And then I got my big idea. A short while after that Blue Monday, in a flash, an epiphany, I knew exactly how my book was going to end. I scribbled it all down in a flurry and knew then I had nailed it.
I just had to fill in the rest. I did. It’s been fun. I hope it is for you.

AC
Aidan Conway
Twitter
Author bio:
Aidan Conway was born in Birmingham and has been living in Italy since 2001. He has been a bookseller, a proofreader, a language consultant, as well as a freelance teacher, translator, and editor for the United Nations FAO. He is currently an assistant university lecturer in Rome, where he lives with his family. A Known Evil is his first novel.

***Don’t miss the other bloggers on the #BlogTour***
Blog Tour - A Known Evil[1772] BANNER

Anne Bonny Book Reviews 1st birthday! #Review Q&A & #GIVEAWAY The Devil’s Dice by @RozWatkins @HQstories @HarperCollinsUK UK & IRL only #DerbyshireNoir #DebutAuthor

Today is my first blog birthday!!!!!
I would love to thank the awesome bloggers, publishers, publicists & authors etc. That have supported me and my little blog!
Especially Sarah Hardy, Noelle Holton and my awesome boss Joe Ide.
*Special thanks to Roz Watkins for this fabulous Q&A and giveaway! 
Here’s to many, many more years of booky love, Twitter gifs and 5* GENIUS reads!

 Today on my blog, I have a super duper special #Giveaway, for a proof copy of The Devil’s Dice. The first in the DI Meg Dalton series and a cracking read by debut author Roz Watkins. So let me tell you a little bit more about the novel…….

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The Devil’s Dice by Roz Watkins
Synopsis:

A white-knuckle crime debut introducing DI Meg Dalton, perfect for fans of Broadchurch and Happy Valley.
The devil is coming…

A SHOCKING DEATH

A lawyer is found dead in a Peak District cave, his face ribboned with scratches.

A SINISTER MESSAGE

Amidst rumours of a local curse, DI Meg Dalton is convinced this is cold-blooded murder. There’s just one catch – chiselled into the cave wall above the body is an image of the grim reaper and the dead man’s initials, and it’s been there for over a century.

A DEADLY GAME

As Meg battles to solve the increasingly disturbing case, it’s clear someone knows her secrets. The murderer is playing games with Meg – and the dice are loaded…

My review:

The Devil’s Dice is a Derbyshire noir, debut novel. It is incredibly well written and expertly plotted out, to keep you guessing the entire way through! There are themes of curses, ghouls, myths and legends. Which are well known in Derbyshire, two I grew up knowing of were hermits cave and the drummer boy! But essentially the novel is about the characters and their relationships with each other.
Their development and pasts make for intriguing reading.
Every character has a past and that includes DI Meg Dalton……….

The novel opens with a violent scene and I wondered if this would be the pace of the entire novel. But it was much more of a whodunit and the intensity developed as the characters unravelled. The author has only used violence or graphic scenes when necessary with the plot.
DI Meg Dalton is called to a crime scene at Devil’s Dice, a local known suicide spot. A male victim has been found, whilst it first appears as a suicide, there are hints of murderous intent. There is an almond aroma in the air and the body is found lying under his carvings of his own initials on the cave wall. But how are the ancient cave markings related to this murder?
Devils Dice as a cave site in the peak district, conjures up images and makes for an atmospheric crime scene……

“The rumour is – if you can’t find the noose, it’s your sign you should leave”

We learn more about the history of the cave from the 1800s and its links to witches. Inside the cave is a large chain, still hanging. It is thought that back in the day, suspected witches were hung from this chain! There has been a recent young teenage girl, that chose to end her life from the chain. DI Dalton and partner DS Jai Sanghera have a tough case to solve. There are cupcakes at the scene that appear to have been laced with cyanide.
But who poisons a man in a cave by cupcakes and why?

The victim is Peter Hamilton, a patent lawyer. He is married to local GP Dr Kate Webster. He has a complex family history, with some believing the family is cursed. His business partners Felix Carstairs and Edward Swift, are a huge part of his day to day lives and become early suspects. They report that Peter had become distracted, the last six months and this had caused him to put their firm at risk! Felix even accusing Peter of alcoholism and marital affairs. But is this enough to kill your business partner? The wives of the partners are also involved in the case. Grace Swift, Edwards wife, is the picture perfect stepford wife. But what secrets does she hold? Olivia Carstairs, Felix’s wife seems meek and timid, as she panders to her child’s every need.
At this point I began to struggle with the characters. I am not a fan of novels, that follow the ‘poor’ struggles/tragedies of the wealthy middle class! But this is where I got this novel so wrong! The masks the character’s wear, begin to slip and we discover none are as perfect, as they’d like to portray………..

The novels delves deeper into the character’s backgrounds. We learn of Peters odd relationship with a known tramp. There are hints of Greek mythology and in particular Tithonus; but how does this tie into the case? We learn of Felix’s past and his rather savage bullying style, he inflicts on others.
The characterisation keeps you guessing. Whilst they seem perfect and innocent on the outside, they are a bunch of oddballs and weirdos, once you scratch the surface. We also learn small clues into Meg’s background and how Jai has a crazy ex-wife. With no-one whom they seem and so many suspicions, it was clear to me don’t trust the wives……….

The plot is so cleverly written that every time I felt I had it figured, the author would through in another huge curve ball! It has twists/turns galore. The novel also deals with some incredibly complex issues such as suicide and euthanasia. It is sensitively done and opens up so much room for debate. I think this novel would make an excellent choice for book groups. There are brief themes of mental illness and trust. But ultimately the core themes are of secrets/lies and the bonds of family and what they demand of us! I think DI Meg Dalton is a fantastic protagonist and I look forward to more novels in the series!

What makes Derbyshire Noir so special………
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The Derbyshire countryside is truly beautiful, it makes for an atmospheric setting!
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Black rock mist

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Black rock crevasse

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Black rock trees

Q&A with #DebutAuthor Roz Watkins

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) A lawyer is found dead in a Peak District cave, his face covered with scratches. As DI Meg Dalton investigates, she makes a chilling discovery. Chiselled into the cave wall above the body, hidden by foliage, is an image of the grim reaper and the dead man’s initials, and it’s been there for over a century. Although the locals blame a curse dating from the times of the witch trials, Meg is convinced there’s a rational explanation.
But as she battles to solve the increasingly disturbing case, her own family secrets refuse to stay buried.

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

A) I hadn’t written any fiction since school, but had always had a vague idea that I’d like to write a book one day. I never took it very seriously, and I’d always been too busy with my job as a patent attorney. After I gave that up and started running holiday cottages, I became a lot more creative. One day when I was out walking the dog, I had an idea for a short story in which a farmer is killed by his own cows. It looked like an accident but the cows were actually trained by his wife. I was very much into clicker-training, and my mind must have been exploring all the possibilities!

I got home and wrote my story, with no idea what I was doing, and something prompted me to enter it for an online competition. To my astonishment, it was shortlisted, and this encouraged me to keep going.

I joined a local writing group and wrote more short stories, but I started getting ideas about a novel. With astonishing naivety, I bought ‘The Complete Idiots Guide to Writing a Novel’ and just got cracking!

I was soon completely hooked, and read every book I could get my hands on about how to write, as well as analysing favourite books to try and work out how the author had done it. I befriended police and CSIs, got them drunk and tried to get all their secrets.
Luckily, my mum was doctor and was very happy (possibly a little too happy!) to share all her ideas on how to kill people.

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) Strangely, most of my absolute favourites are not crime. I love Lionel Shriver, especially ‘So Much for That’ and ‘We Need to Talk about Kevin’. I think ‘Falling’ by Colin Thubron is a perfect little book, and touches on some of the ideas in my first book. I also love ‘Never Let Me Go’ by Kazuo Ishiguro.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) I read a lot of Enid Blyton as a young child, and Dick Francis as a teenager – classy stuff! A book called ‘Dream of Fair Horses’ was one of my favourites – a lovely book about love and loss pretending to be a kids’ pony book.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) I’m not quite published yet (and I suspect this is the best bit now!) I’ve really enjoyed going to festivals and meeting readers and other authors. The HarperCollins summer party is a bit of a highlight too!

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) I’ve made some fantastic friends through attending local writing courses and groups, and also and online through Twitter and by exchanging critiques on Scribophile. The community of writers is lovely and so supportive.

Roz Watkins
Roz Watkins
Authors Links:
Website
Twitter

#Giveaway
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***To be in with a chance of winning a proof copy of The Devils Dice.
Simply RT The pinned post at @annebonnybook making sure to follow Roz & myself.
Or leave a comment on this blog post.
Or comment on the original Facebook post at Anne Bonny Book Reviews
UK & IRL only & Good luck!***
*Winner will be drawn by my son Lil Ste on Sunday evening! The #Giveaway will remain open ALL weekend!
Have a fabulous weekend reading book worms! 

#AMightyBlogTour My #Review of A Mighty Dawn by @theodorebrun @CorvusBooks by @annebonnybook #HistoricalFantasy 5*

*I received an arc via the publisher in return for an honest review*
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A Mighty Dawn by Theodore Brun
Synopsis:

Sworn to honour.

Broken by betrayal.

Hakan, son of Haldan, chosen son of the Lord of the Northern Jutes, swears loyalty to his father in fire, in iron, and in blood. But there are always shadows that roam. When a terrible tragedy befalls Hakan’s household he is forced to leave his world behind. He must seek to pledge his sword to a new king. Nameless and alone, he embarks on a journey to escape the bonds of his past and fulfil his destiny as a great warrior.

Whispers of sinister forces in the north pull Hakan onwards to a kingdom plagued by mysterious and gruesome deaths. But does he have the strength to do battle with such dark foes? Or is death the only sane thing to seek in this world of blood and broken oaths?

My review:

Hakan son of Haldan, chosen son of the lord of the Northern Jutes. Is the protagonist of this EPIC novel!
Throughout the novel, he will face many challenges that will shake everything he has ever known, to the core……

The prologue opens with a prince on a hunt, he is attacked by a deer. But the attack leaves so much surrounding mystery. When have you ever known, a deer savagely attack a hunter? Are shadowy forces at work?

In the land of the Jutes and in particular, the farmstead of Vendlagard; the lifestyle and hierarchy of the Viking tribe is fully explained. There is a great feast to take place. For Hakan to finally pledge his oath to his father and the kingdom. We learn that Hakan is not a ‘picture perfect’ image of a great warrior. A man whom walks with a limp. We learn why he has such a limp and the story of his parent’s past.
At the feast we learn Hakan is in love, with his cousin Inga. They have a secret love affair of great depth, and are waiting for the appropriate time to inform Haldan of their intentions to marry.

At the feast a stranger arrives, promising tales of future wisdom. The tribe entertain her notions and listen in earnest. But she begins with riddles and curses “you will bear much pain, but you will never break”
“You will fall and rise again” she informs Hakan.
Haldan tires of her dramatics and hangs her!
This novel is accurate to historical fact. The Vikings were savage and brutal. The reader should be under no disillusions of the level of violence within this novel.
Similarly, the story of the Gods is explained. Odin, Frey & Freya, Thor, Njord, Loki, Tyr and Weyland are all covered in detail. The Vikings passion for their gods and their belief system is sacred.

At the feast, a fight breaks out between Hakan and Konur (Hakan’s sworn enemy). The fight is over Inga’s attentions and honour. But could have much deeper repercussions, for both the tribes and ultimately lead to war. At Haldan’s insistence the pair agree to shake hands. But the feud is far from over……..

Hakan awakens the next morning, to discover he is being sent on a mission to several of the external villages. His father believing, he has brought disgrace to the tribe, with his fight the night before.
When he arrives at nearby village Vindhaven, he finds a village burning. Women being shackled and stolen, the stinking air of death lingers, Hakan knows he must report back to his father immediately!

‘You’re to be a man, not a monster’

When Hakan returns, a battle is launched, to protect the tribes honour. What comes, shows the full life/death experience of a young Vikings life. But whilst Hakan battles for his tribe’s honour. Konur returns to Vendlagard and Inga is in fear for her life….

“A man cannot mourn forever. But he can remember” Haldan

When Hakan returns victorious from the spoils of war. He is met with a beautiful but shaken Inga. She informs him, that she is with child and they must ask Haldan for a marriage before the child is born. Hakan is apprehensive, he knows how the hierarchy of the tribe would organise such marriages. His father would be a fool to waste two young lives. When marriages could bring more alliances and wealth to Vendlagard.

“The summer was full of light. Now, all I see ahead is darkness. I want to run but I don’t know where. I’m afraid, Hakan” – Inga

When their love affair is exposed. Old secrets are exposed, that bring great pain and devastation to everyone at Vendlagard.
Hakan is destroyed, as a man, a lover and a Viking. He renounces his birth right. Leaving Vendlegard for good…..

‘He was a stranger. Here. Everywhere. A man owed nothing. Trusted by no one, with no one to trust’

‘In the darkness of his pain, it seemed to shine like gold. Like the first day of a mighty dawn’

This novel is brilliantly written, with incredible detail and emotion. You become heavily invested in the characters and the trials they face; in their search for a better future. For historical fiction it has incredible accuracy and I CANNOT wait to read the next instalment in the series!
It also explores the underlying theme of ‘not all kin, is blood related’.
It is a story of redemption and courage. Good vs evil. Mystery, magic and illusion will all play their part.
An outstanding debut 5*

TB
Theodore Brun
Authors links
Website: www.theodorebrun.com/home
Twitter: @theodorebrun

***The blurb on the cover recommends the novel for fans of The Game Of Thrones series. Having read all the Game Of Thrones novels in just 13 days! I can confirm that the recommendation is 100% spot on!***

Check out the other blogs on the #AMightyBlogTour

Blog tour poster final - 2.1.18

 

 

Q&A with @JohnKnockAuthor #Author of, The Wolfman Of Auchtermuchty #Indie #Scottish #Horror #Debut

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The Wolfman Of Auchtermuchty by John Knock

Q&A:

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) I’m a new writer. I’m a Scottish writer in the sense that my work is set in Scotland and it has a scots accent, or several of them in fact. Genre wise, its hybrid mixing comedy, horror and crime. I grew up in Fife, hence why I started with this novel but I’ve lived in lots of places across Scotland and I’m drawing on this when I’m writing.

The Wolfman of Auchtermuchty has a whole cast of characters. It slips in time between the present day and twenty years ago, always through the characters’ eyes. Craig Miller is a tabloid journalist, who left Fife after his mother’s disappearance, a still unsolved case in which he and his father were both suspected. He hopes to write a sensational piece about wolf sightings to re-start his career. His return opens up old secrets with his friends and a conspiracy that he helped to start.

Meantime, DS Jimmy Melville has found a finger and this points to a missing planning officer. He starts to investigate the case with the help of PC Shirley Stevenson while trying to keep his IBS under control. However, as the body parts start turning up on the eve of a royal visit, the possibility of a creature, perhaps a rabid dog, could create a panic.

Dr Susannah Martin is trying to write her new work but gets distracted by a handsome student, who has some interesting theories that challenge her own. When Craig Miller turns up the doorstep, she could literally lose her head.

A group of school friends need to decide who they can trust and what secrets to keep as an old curse starts to reap its revenge.

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

A) It has been like a slow-moving boulder that took a long time to get momentum. There’s a difference between the early stages of writing – I wrote the prologue years ago – and put it all together. Re-writing, changing bits and making it all link up. It took me a while to find my voice. Now the boulder is rolling along, ideas and dialogue just keep rushing at me. Ideas for plots and situations I could always get. Getting the characters right took a little longer. Now I have them cueing up and I really want to get on with the next novel.
I would just keep re-writing so having a deadline was essential. It means I have to deliver.
Editing is more difficult. I needed to take time and make sure the formatting is correct, to proof read. Next time, I’m going to hand this over to someone else.
After Wolfman it will get easier because I have a voice, a style to match the characters and ideas.

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) I like writing that makes you think and I like books that feel that the writer is talking to you or letting the characters talk to you. Irvine Welsh, Christopher Brookmyre and the late Iain Banks all did this in very different ways. I have to rate Welsh’s The Acid House. I love it. His characters talk to you and each have their own voice. If you haven’t read it, do so. I just laughed out loud. Brookmyre’s One Fine Day in the Middle of the Night is when he found his voice. Complicity is really powerful. You could start with Espedair Street if you want to get into Banks.
I would also have to say A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters by Julian Barnes and of course Lanark by Alasdair Gray, probably the most interesting use of the novel as an artefact.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) I loved Roger Lancelyn Green’s adaptions of the Greek and Norse myths as a kid. Ian Serraillier’s The Silver Sword and Holms’ I am David were beautifully crafted. Then I got into sci-fi, Clarke and Aznimov. I really enjoyed the scope of possibilities. As an older teen, I read fantasy for a while but I just can’t get into it now. I find them too formulaic. Except for Pratchett, he was really creative. He started off spoofing the genre and ended up really dealing with concerns about our own world. If anyone can suggest a well written fantasy novel that does something different, I’ll give it a go.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) That I’ve done it. The book is out there and now I can start a relationship with my readers. I look forward to their view and feedback. I also look forward to speaking to other authors. I find those who talk about the writing process the most interesting. My test reader said she laughed out loud and believed in the characters, so I’m looking to see what others get from it.

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) My wife.
She is the one who nagged me and kept me on task. My friend Jim also helped to kick start it. It’s good to have people with faith in you.
Listening to other authors talk about their work. Lee Child is great, he cares about his audience, his readership. Mark Billington’s A Stab in the Dark, is an excellent podcast. Listening to them really helped as I brought the whole thing together.
My father said to me years ago that he always thought I’d be a writer. It just took me a long time to find my voice. Funny thing is I’m now saying this about my own son and I’m not the only one.

*Thank you for taking part in the Q&A on my blog, I wish you every success with your writing career.

author
John Knock
Author links:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnKnockAuthor
Facbook: https://www.facebook.com/JohnKnockAuthor
Website : under construction