Anne Bonny #BookReview The Lost Child by Emily Gunnis 4* #DualTimeline #Historical #NewRelease @headlinepg @EmilyGunnis

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The Lost Child by Emily Gunnis
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Synopsis ~

A tragic death. A missing baby. A long-kept secret…

1960. Thirteen-year-old¬†Rebecca lives in fear of her father’s temper. As a storm batters Seaview Cottage one night, she hears a visitor at the door and a violent argument ensues. By the time the police arrive, Rebecca’s parents are dead and the visitor has fled. No one believes Rebecca heard a stranger downstairs…

2014. Iris, a journalist, is sent to cover the story of a new mother on the run with her desperately ill baby. But fatefully the trail leads to the childhood home of Iris’s own mother, Rebecca…Seaview Cottage.
As Iris races to unravel what happened the night Rebecca’s parents were killed, it’s time for Seaview Cottage to give up its secrets.

My Review ~

*The kindle version of this title is currently just 99p in the UK and you can add the audible (narrated by Emilia Fox) for just £4.99.*

The Lost Child is a complex novel set between 1960 and 2014. The characters are detailed and all have individual depth and background stories. The title open in November 1960 with Rebecca Waterhouse (a young child) in an interview room with unsympathetic police officer DI Gibbs. Rebecca is a witness to her paranoid fathers regular violent beatings of her mother. Rebecca feels alone in the world, if it wasn’t for her close friend Harvey Roberts.
Rebecca’s father’s story is explored and although he can be a violent and ruthless man. His decent into paranoia via battle neurosis is eye-opening.

The novel then jumps forward to November 2014 and Harvey’s daughter Jessie has recently given birth. Jessie is estranged from her birth mother and is struggling with the recent grief of the loss of her step-mother 2yrs ago. The deep grief resulted in Jessie being diagnosed depressed and medicated. When she gives birth, the hormones and emotional trauma will result in panic and irrational fear taking control…

‘Why doesn’t she like me? why isn’t she feeding?

When Jessie flees the hospital with new-born baby in tow. This results in an emergency situation. For unbeknown to Jessie, the baby has an untreated infection, without medication the child may not survive.

In the flashbacks to the past we learn of Harriet and Jacob Waterhouse, their married life together and Jacob’s return from war. The novel really explores the theme of returning military personnel from the battlefield to home and hopefully relative safety. The ease at which a person can develop an alcohol problem and excuse short tempered/violent or jealous behaviours is laid bare.

‘The old Jacob had died on the beaches of Normandy and was never coming home to her’

Alternatively Jessie’s plight becomes a major news story. And Iris as a journalist begins digging into her past. Will what Iris uncovers bring peace to them all? Can Iris track down Jessie’s whereabouts in time to save the baby?
Past and present entwine to reveal a captivating story. 4*

EG
Emily Gunnis
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