Anne Bonny #BlogTour #GuestPost #Location #Inpiration Black Moss by @Nolanwriter #MancNoir @fahrenheitpress #NewRelease #Mystery

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Black Moss by David Nolan
Synopsis:

In April 1990, as rioters took over Strangeways prison in Manchester, someone killed a little boy at Black Moss.

And no one cared.

No one except Danny Johnston, an inexperienced radio reporter trying to make a name for himself.

More than a quarter of a century later, Danny returns to his home city to revisit the murder that’s always haunted him.

If Danny can find out what really happened to the boy, maybe he can cure the emptiness he’s felt inside since he too was a child.

But finding out the truth might just be the worst idea Danny Johnston has ever had.

Guest Post:

Location/Inspiration

One of the main characters in the book isn’t a person at all – it’s the landscape around Manchester. It dominates. You can even see the hills from the city centre – they cup Manchester like a horseshoe. You can’t get away from them. The moors around Oldham, in particular, are especially bleak and unforgiving. In parts there isn’t even a tree to break up the view. The vista is as intimidating as anything you’d get in Scandinavia and sometimes almost as snowbound. It’s not necessarily what you’d think of when the word ‘Manchester’ is mentioned is it? But it’s true.

We’ve had plenty of ‘Scandi Noir’…Black Moss is ‘Manc Noir’.

The original idea came to me when I was out walking. I came across a reservoir way up in the hills that had a beach. Ian Brown, lead singer of The Stone Roses has a famous quote: ‘Manchester’s got everything, apart from a beach.’ It appears he was wrong. Here was a beach. I had a notion: ‘If I was going to dump a body somewhere, this is where I’d do it.’ Then I thought: ‘What a really weird thing to cross my mind.’ I looked at the map to see what the reservoir was called. It was called Black Moss.
Such a great name. Black Moss. Wow.

I couldn’t see another human being as far as I looked in every direction, yet in the distance I could see the skyline on Manchester City Centre. I thought that if anything happened to me here, I’d be done for. Yet I can see Manchester. Help is near, yet so far away. It gave me the chills. It all started from that thought, though there were several years between me seeing the beach and starting the book.

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David Nolan
Website
Twitter

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Anne Bonny #BlogTour Q&A with @IPatrick_Author #RubiconBook #CrimeFiction #PoliceProcedural @fahrenheitpress Where truth and lies collide. . .

Rubicon Cover
Rubicon by Ian Patrick
Synopsis:

Two cops, both on different sides of the law – both with the same gangland boss in their sights.

Sam Batford is an undercover officer with the Metropolitan Police who will stop at nothing to get his hands on fearsome crime-lord Vincenzo Guardino’s drug supply.

DCI Klara Winter runs a team on the National Crime Agency, she’s also chasing down Guardino, but unlike Sam Batford she’s determined to bring the gangster to justice and get his drugs off the streets.

Set in a time of austerity and police cuts where opportunities for corruption are rife, Rubicon is a tense, dark thriller that is definitely not for the faint hearted.

Q&A:

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) I left school at sixteen and joined the Civil Service, in Nottingham, as an Admin Clerk. After a few years I decided to apply for the Police. I joined the Metropolitan Police at nineteen and served for twenty-seven years, the majority of which was in Specialist Crime as a Detective Sergeant. I’ve investigated most crimes ranging from Theft to Murder. I’ve also worked in intelligence. My retirement was due to disability. I found out eight years ago that I have Muscular Dystrophy. Retirement led to writing!

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

A) I’ve written for years but never taken it seriously until a few years ago. No Exit press had a short story competition and the prize was a publishing contract. I had no expectation but wrote a short story and sent it in. I made the final three! But never won, (Boo!). However that short story became the first chapter of Rubicon and the rest developed from there. I had the usual round of rejections from publishers and agents until Chris McVeigh, at Fahrenheit Press, picked it up and loved it! In addition the BBC have also felt the same way and optioned it for TV, beginning with a six part series.

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) I read widely and rarely read a series, however I do enjoy: George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh, Ed McBain, Lynda La Plant, Cormac McCarthy, Chuck Palahniuk, Colin Bateman, Saira Viola and Jane Issac. If I were to recommend two books they would be: Fight Club By Chuck Palahniuk and The Road by Cormac McCarthy. Both have strong narrative but entirely opposite in terms of structure and story. Both evoke a strong feeling of ‘what have I just experienced?’ That to me is the mark of a great book. One that leaves the reader marvelling at the storyline and the journey they’ve been on.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) I read all the Sven Hassel books as a child. I was mesmerised by the cruel reality of war he portrayed as he had served as a tank driver. In addition to that, James Herriot was another favourite of mine. I didn’t get Famous Five or any of the ‘classic’ children’s reads. I wanted realism in my fiction. This has stayed with me, hence writing crime.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) Without doubt the reader feedback. I’ve been overwhelmed by the positive response Rubicon has received. There’s no better feeling hearing that you’ve made a moment, in a person’s day, pleasurable. For me that’s why I write.

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) My wife. She has to take the strain with the family while I crack on getting words down! She also speaks sense and is the first reader of anything I’ve written. My greatest source of support, outside of home, has been Jane Isaac. She’s guided me along the way and given advice but never dictated what I should do. She’s a fantastic, established, writer and it’s been wonderful to have her friendship and support.

IP: I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, Abby, and all the book blogging community who support writers’ and keep the world of reading and literature alive.

ian patrick
Ian Patrick
Twitter
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Q&A with @jackiechaddy #Author of, In The Still & Briefly Maiden @fahrenheitpress #NewRelease

Delighted to open today with a publication day Q&A with Jacqueline Chadwick.
But first here are the novels…………

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In The Still
Ali Dalglish #1
Synopsis:

“An astounding debut, breathtaking…”

When Ali Dalglish immigrated to Canada she left behind her career as Britain’s most in-demand forensic pathologist & criminal psychologist.

Now, eight years later, Ali feels alone, and bored, and full of resentment. Suffocated and frustrated by her circumstances and in an increasingly love-starved marriage, Ali finds herself embroiled in a murder case that forces her to call upon her dormant investigative skills.

As she’s pulled deeper into the case of ‘The Alder Beach Girl’ and into the mind of a true psychopath, Ali is forced to confront her fears and to finally embrace her own history of mental illness.

In an increasingly febrile atmosphere Ali must fight hard to protect those she loves from the wrath of a determined and vicious predator and to ultimately allow the woman she once was to breathe again.

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Briefly Maiden
Ali Dalglish #2
Synopsis:

Ali Dalglish is back in the role she loves: working alongside Vancouver Island’s Integrated Major Incident Squad and is once again partnered with Inspector Rey Cuzzocrea.

As the chemistry between Ali and Cuzzocrea intensifies so does the hunt for a twisted killer as they are tasked with solving a series of violent murders with links to a sinister paedophile ring in the idyllic island city of Cedar River.

In the midst of the chaos, Ali is pulled by her desire to find and save the children at the heart of the case but she is thwarted by an evil so cunning and powerful that it threatens to become the nemesis she never imagined possible: one that could bring her to her knees.

Q&A:

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) In Briefly Maiden, Ali Dalglish has her life back on track. Recently divorced, she is working alongside the Vancouver Island Integrated Major Incident Squad investigating the brutal murder and dismemberment of a man in Cedar River. When a second victim is discovered, it becomes clear to Ali that a crime spree is underway and the investigation leads the VIIMIS team to a local paedophile ring. As the lines dividing good and evil, right and wrong become increasingly blurred, Ali must utilise her wealth of expertise in a race again time to save the children lost in an unimaginably dark existence.

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

A) With a character like Ali Dalglish, there’s never any shortage of possibilities so the ideas flow easily and the series comes together relatively effortlessly. I adore the writing process, every aspect of it (even the scary, heart-pounding moments of sending it off and hoping it won’t be rejected) it’s all exciting and rewarding. Specific plots always come about as a result of things that madden me during the research stage of writing. I am angered by injustice and the holes in the law that allow monsters the freedom to prey upon innocents. Briefly Maiden explores those issues and the dangerous psychology that drives deviants to seek each other out, to gain power in numbers and the role we, as a society, play in that.

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) I’m a crime fiction fan and so I love P.D. James, Christie and Doyle. Michael Connelly, Lee Child, Val McDermid and Ian Rankin are guaranteed brilliance but my favourite author has to be Thomas Harris. At the moment I’m working my way through the Fahrenheit Press novels and, wow, can they pick winners. Every book on their list is terrific, I love Jo Perry’s work, Derek Farrell is belting and I’m currently fan-girling for Nikki Dolson.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) When I was little, I devoured Roald Dhal. The first book I fell in love with was Fungus the Bogeyman. As a teenager I would immerse myself in Stephen King and Dean Koontz so I have them to blame for my twisted mind.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) Life is waaaaaay better as a published writer. Having low expectations has always served me well in life and so I deliberately keep them low with regard to my books, it makes every moment a fantastic surprise. The thought of someone actually buying my book and enjoying it, of them picturing the characters and settings is a feeling I’ll never take for granted. But the very best moment is seeing a front cover design for the first time. Fahrenheit Press just get that so right, check out their books, they’re absolutely beautiful, each one is a piece of art and (being unapologetically biased) mine are frigging awesome!

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) Chris McVeigh at Fahrenheit Press is the epitome of support and encouragement. My husband and kids, I have the best little family in the world and they are all so supportive and excited.

JC
Jacqueline Chadwick
Author links:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/jackiechaddy?lang=en – @jackiechaddy
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17006765.Jacqueline_Chadwick

 

 

Derbyshire Noir #1: Q&A with Tony R Cox, author of A Fatal Drug 5*

I was born in Lancashire but I went to secondary school in Derby and residential college in Buxton. So Derbyshire is a setting I know and love in novels. Derbyshire varies, from the beautiful peak district to the urban inner city that I know and love!
I have met very few authors in person. But one I have met and certainly won’t forget is Tony R Cox aka Richard Cox.
I met Richard just over a year ago at the signing of All Through The Night by M.P Wright in London. He is such a fantastic bloke and what Richard don’t know about Derby, ain’t worth knowing! I knew as soon as I started my blog, He would be brilliant for a Q&A. Very intelligent, a cracking sense of humour and rather dashing in ‘that shirt’ pic above. here is Richard’s Q&A………..

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A Fatal Drug by Tony R Cox 5*

The synopsis:

England. 1971. Reporter Simon Jardine is on the hunt for the story that will kick start his career and when a tortured, mutilated body turns up on his patch he can’t help thinking his luck is finally in. At first glance the provincial town of Derby is about as far away from the sex, drugs and rock-n-roll of London and California as it’s possible to imagine but as Jardine begins to scratch below the surface he finds that all is not well in England’s green and pleasant land. Along with fellow reporter Dave Green and local DJ Tom Freeman, Jardine is soon drawn into a spiral of gangland drug dealing and violence that stretches from the north of England to the south of Spain.

Q&A:

Q) Please can you give the readers a summary of your background, main character Simon Jardine & novel A Fatal Drug?

A) My father was a railway signalling engineer and mother a nurse. I was born in Barking, London, and lived in Glasgow, Lancaster, Crewe, Lahore in Pakistan, and then back to Cheshire before secondary school in Buxton, Derbyshire. I have a long family history in Derby, going back to the early 1800s. My great, grandfather worked alongside Sir Robert Peel, MP for Tamworth; my great grandfather and his brother were in the wine and beer business in Derby. My maternal grandmother was the last private nurse to Richard, the last of the Arkwright family – ‘Father of the Industrial Revolution’ and creator of the factory system.

My first proper job was as a cub reporter at the Derby Evening Telegraph in 1970 where my love of rock music and jazz was allowed full rein as a reviewer, as well as learning the ropes of regional journalism. It is from this era I chose my central characters. Simon Jardine is an amalgam of some great young journalists, with the naivety we all showed in our early 20s; Dave Green and Tom Freeman are loosely based on major influencers – both of whom have died.

For A Fatal Drug local reporter Simon Jardine’s romantic hotel room assignation is rudely interrupted by a grey, lifeless body staring through the skylight.

Simon, with crime reporter Dave Green and DJ-cum part time private investigator Tom Freeman, become enmeshed in the mystery of who the dead man was and how he ended up on the hotel roof.

The story travels to Spain and North Africa as the search for answers and a front page lead draws the three friends deeper into a growing drugs trade. Murder and prostitution are rife, but they’re no nearer getting the answers to their questions.

What links the hotel body to the drugs trade? Why does a would-be music reviewer go missing? Who is a bigger ‘godfather’ than Derby’s Mr Big? Is the threat of violence and death really worth it for a front page lead?

Q) I went to secondary school in Derby in the 1990’s. I absolutely loved the setting of Derby, I think Derby is such an intriguing City and its demographic changes street to street. It is also home to some of the most beautiful countryside. A Fatal Drug is set in 1971 Derby, what made you pick this era & this city?

A) The early 1970s were a time of sexual freedom, the drugs trade reached deeply and openly into the music scene, and society was undergoing some big changes society. For newspaper reporters, there were no mobile phones or the internet, and there was a culture, accepted by editors, that they could drink as much as they liked as long as they got the story.

Derby was transitioning slowly from being a heavily engineering-based employer to a more diverse economy. At the same time it was preserving some great architecture; building a new series of bridges over the River Derwent and a new ring road; and feeling the effects of some disastrous planning approvals, like any large urban area trying to build a strong future.

I like to think of Derby as ‘manageable’. It is possible to segment it historically and a short walk will take the visitor into wildly differing, architecturally emotional sectors: the new shopping centre; the Cathedral Quarter (Britain’s Best High Street); the riverside; the railway cottages conservation area; the miles of redbrick terraces, built to house workers at Rolls-Royce and the other engineering companies; and the wonderful parks.

Q) How much change have you seen in Derby from the 1970’s to 2017? Do you think it still makes for a brilliant location in 2017?

A) The city is a great ‘town’. It was given city status in 1997, but cannot shake off the ‘town’ tag. This, I believe is brilliant. I occasionally take people to Derby (200+ real ale pubs is a pretty good ‘draw’) and delight in showing them history that is still happening!

I am very surprised that some Derby locations have not been used for filmed period dramas, and by ‘period’ that could be Georgian, Victorian, Edwardian and right through to the 70s. In a literary sense, an author I much admire, Steven Dunne, has set his enthralling Reaper series in 21st century Derby to great effect.

 

Q) I love that in your novel you are not afraid to shy away from themes of drug dealing, brothels & organised crime. It’s also hard to imagine such goings on in Derby. Did you base the novel on any real crimes? Or did they influence the writing in any way?

A) I don’t remember the town being so violent, but drug dealing was rife. I interviewed prostitutes and worked with an Irish newspaper to gain affidavits in a legal case, which meant entering a pub in the area of terraced housing by one door, meeting a prostitute at the bar, and running out of the other door – followed by a horde of irate men! Scratch the surface of any urban area and I think the criminal element will float up.

Q) The novel is set between two locations Derby & southern Spain, which is very good in terms of reflective locations. What drove the story this way?

A) There were two key drivers: the first is that I know Derby and its history well; secondly, drug smuggling involved people tapping into the burgeoning holiday destinations of southern Spain. While development in the Costas has covered vast areas in concrete, the geography remains largely the same.

 

Q) What are your favourite novels from childhood, teenage years to adulthood?

A) There were four phases I remember, apart from the early years of comics and Billy Bunter. My first ‘big’ author was W. E Johns and the Biggles series; then came Dennis Wheatley and Rider Haggard; later secondary school was the time of JRR Tolkien, James Joyce (and I was one of the only kids to actually enjoy Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and The Dubliners), and the First World War poets.

Now, depending on what I’m doing, I immerse myself in the works redolent of ‘my era’, such as Alan Sillitoe and John Braine. For pure enjoyment I read the latest novels by such luminaries as Steven Dunne, Stephen Booth, Sarah Ward (all set in Derbyshire), and, of course, my much acclaimed friend, M. P Wright. I also try and read as many of the books published by Fahrenheit Press, my publisher, as possible.

Q) What is next for Tony R Cox and will there be another Simon Jardine thriller?

A) The next Simon Jardine thriller is currently with my ‘editor’ who has found faults (don’t they all), but has called it well-crafted. From such an incisive and critical reader, that takes on the role of an Oscar in my estimation!

Jardine, Dave Green and Tom Freeman are again on the trail of news headlines. This time the story starts with a rock band’s homecoming gig in Wolverhampton, moves quickly into a possible expose of corrupt record sales in the music industry, and thence to drugs and murder. Police corruption lies at the heart of a novel that casts a spotlight on the finances of the IRA.

I’m also writing short stories and a more difficult work that has two main characters who speak in different dialects. It’s tough, but it exercises the writing brain.

 

Q) Aside from meeting me, What has been your favourite thing about being a published author?

A) Meeting your husband! No, not really, but he’s a great bloke.
There are so many positives about being a recognised writer. My first self-published Simon Jardine thriller, First Dead Body, was a personal achievement and the ‘launch’ party at Scarthin Books in Cromford, Derbyshire, was fantastic; being accepted by Fahrenheit Press for my second, A Fatal Drug, was hugely thrilling. I think the biggest change is the chance to mix with so many writers and readers whom I have admired for years, and the undimmed support they give me.

Contact for Tony R Cox
Web: http://www.tonyrcox.co.uk/
Twitter @TonyRCox

*Huge Thanks to Tony for taking part in the Q&A on by blog and I wish you much success with your further writing 🙂