Anne Bonny #BlogTour #GuestPost by @joel_hames #NoOneWillHear – Who Is Sam Williams? Character profile #NewRelease #CrimeFiction

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No One Will Hear by Joel Hames
Synopsis:

Four murders
Four messages
One chance to catch a killer.

Renowned human rights lawyer Elizabeth Maurier lies dead, her body mutilated, her killer unknown. For DI Olivia Martins and her team, it’s a mystery. For the victim’s daughter Lizzy, a poet and academic with a shaky grasp on reality, it’s a tragedy. But for Sam Williams, the man Elizabeth fired a decade ago and hasn’t spoken to since, it’s a whole new world of pain.

Elizabeth’s death has stirred a sleeping past back to life. Former clients are darkening Sam’s door, old enemies returning, ancient cases reopening. It doesn’t help that DI Martins is on his case, the press are dogging his every step, and his girlfriend’s behaviour is increasingly erratic.

But Elizabeth’s murder is just the start. As Sam reluctantly digs his way back into the past, more truths will crumble into lies.

More certainties will shade to doubt.

And more innocent people will die.

Guest Post:

WHO IS SAM WILLIAMS?

Hello and thank you for hosting me today. I’d like to take a moment to introduce Sam Williams, the narrator of No One Will Hear and its central character.

Sam is a lawyer. Years ago he worked as a human rights lawyer at a top law firm fighting big, newsworthy cases with a senior partner, Elizabeth Maurier, who made a habit of rocking the establishment. Sam was a rising star. But things went sour. He won a case, saw a potential killer go free, and found it difficult to live with the consequences. He quit before he got himself fired. He set up his own firm and scrabbled around for clients. The clients he wanted were political prisoners, whistleblowers and victims of state brutality. The clients he got were street dealers, gangsters and liars.
A good lawyer, and a good man. With a bad rep.

Sam’s latest series of misadventures begins with Dead North, published back in March, in which Sam was summoned to Manchester by an old friend to try to get some sense out of a murder suspect. He got the guy talking, but it didn’t end well – where Sam’s involved, it rarely does. In No One Will Hear, things take a turn for the worse. Elizabeth Maurier, his old boss, has been murdered, and Sam is drawn reluctantly into his past, re-examining cases he thought dead and buried, meeting clients he hoped he’d never see again.

Although No One Will Hear is just the second book in this new trilogy, there’s plenty of back story for Sam fans to delve into. The Art of Staying Dead introduces Sam a few months before the events of Dead North, with his career at his lowest point, and throws him head first into a prison riot and a political conspiracy. Then there are the novellas, Victims and Caged, both dealing with his time at Mauriers, the friends, the enemies, the mistakes and the close shaves.

As a lawyer, Sam has his good points: his strength is getting under the skin of a case, questioning the apparently obvious, finding the one line that will open a reluctant informant’s mouth or frighten a suspect enough to start telling the truth. As a man, he makes plenty of mistakes: his focus rarely wavers from the job in hand, so it’s all too easy for him to miss the obvious happening right under his nose. And when he gets it wrong, people often wind up dead. Usually people he doesn’t know. Sometimes, people close to him.

No One Will Hear puts Sam to the test as never before. What looks like a thankless and unimportant task is a matter of life and death. What looks like a relationship in a rut hides something deadly. The powerful are merely floundering in their own weakness. People who come as friends can be enemies. And those who come as enemies can be friends. It’s up to Sam to figure all of this out before more innocent people die.

I hope I’ve given you enough to whet your appetite, and thanks again.

JH
Joel Hames
Twitter
Website

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Anne Bonny #BlogTour #GuestPost Character profile: Edith – Dancing On The Grave by @authorzoesharp #NewRelease #CrimeFiction

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Dancing On The Grave by Zoe Sharp
Synopsis:

In one of the most beautiful corners of England,
Something very ugly is about to take place…

A sniper with a mission…
a young cop with nothing to lose…
a CSI with everything to prove…
a teenage girl with a terrifying obsession…

There’s a killer on the loose in the Lake District, and the calm of an English summer is shattered.
For newly qualified crime-scene investigator, Grace McColl, it’s both the start of a nightmare and the chance to prove herself after a mistake that cost a life.
For Detective Constable Nick Weston, recently transferred from London, it’s an opportunity to recover his nerve after a disastrous undercover operation that left him for dead.
And for a lonely, loveless teenage girl, Edith, it’s the start of a twisted fantasy—one she never dreamed might come true.

Guest Post by Zoe Sharp:

Edith in Dancing On The Grave: a standalone crime thriller
Zoë Sharp

I like conflicted characters. They make life interesting. When I started writing my latest standalone crime thriller, Dancing On The Grave, I originally envisaged that the story would centre around the two official characters, CSI Grace McColl (who I first wrote about in a short story called ‘Tell Me’) and DC Nick Weston. As is so often the case, however, the story changed direction in the telling.

Instead of being a straightforward police procedural, as soon as I introduced the ex-military sniper and PTSD sufferer, Patrick Bardwell, and the disturbed teenage girl, Edith Airey, who becomes his spotter, they owned the story. The sniper himself was a complicated mix of predator and victim, but Edith fascinated me.

Edith is seventeen, bored, misunderstood, lonely and loveless. She’s undoubtedly a very screwed-up kid, but not because of the conventional reasons. She’s never been physically abused, but she has been mentally neglected, her problems ignored by her family until they become part of a larger tragedy.

She partly grew out of conversations I had with a friend who took on school-leavers as apprentices in her business. She lamented the fact that the teenagers she employed were largely not prepared to start at the bottom and work their way up the ladder. They simply wanted to be famous. The explosion of semi-reality TV programmes, where it seems there are no depths people won’t sink to in pursuit of fleeting celebrity, cemented my ideas surrounding Edith’s character.

Where others might see the beauty of the Lake District surrounding Edith’s home as a privilege, she sees it as a prison. She feels trapped by the lack of opportunity, ground down by her parents’ lack of ambition—for themselves or for their daughter—and so desperate to escape her existence she’ll take any escape route offered to her.

She’s a fantasist who borders on being unable to discern truth from fiction. In some ways remarkably brave, quick-witted and inventive. And in others, terrifyingly naïve. I couldn’t bring myself to hate her for what she does, but I did end up feeling sorry for her, even so.

At one point in the story, Grace quotes Henry Thoreau in regard to Edith: “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation.” To which Nick adds, “And go to the grave with the song still in them.” Although Thoreau is not thought to be responsible for the second half of the quote, nevertheless, it sums up Edith for me.

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Zoe Sharp
Twitter
Website
Author Bio:
Zoë Sharp spent part of her life in the English Lake District, where Dancing On The Grave is set. A photojournalist for 25 years, she now divides her time between writing novels, crewing yachts, renovating houses, and international pet-sitting. She is currently working on the next in her award-winning Charlie Fox series of crime thrillers.

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Anne Bonny #BlogTour #GuestPost by @RuthEstevez2 #Diversity in #YA fiction #NewRelease YA #Literarture Jiddy Vardy @ZunTold #UKYA #JiddyVardy

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Jiddy Vardy by Ruth Estevez
Full review to follow
Synopsis:

Jiddy is a survivor. Rescued at birth, she grows up in Robin Hood’s Bay, a village harbouring a dangerous secret. Just as romance blossoms and Jiddy finally feels like she belongs, figures from the past threaten to tear her world apart… A thrilling tale of one girl’s search for identity and love, set against a backdrop of smuggling and viole.

Guest post:

Diversity in YA Fiction

I believe there are many young people who aren’t reading because they don’t see it as an option. This could be for many reasons, access to books, difficulties reading, economic, it’s not a tradition in a family or environment to read, there are no role models who love reading, or you just can’t find anything you want to read.
Often, you just want to find a book that you relate to but can’t find it. A character with the same name as you can be enough to pick up that particular book. It could be set where you’re from. I picked up The Ballroom by Anna Hope because it was set in an old Victorian Mental Institution, as they were called, near where I used to live. My friend’s mum went in to do the inmates’ hair as they were called then. My friend Andy, used to drive us in his mini into the courtyard and out under the bridge to scare us. From what, I’m not sure, but it was dark at night and it was a thrill. So, to find a story set High Royds, made me want to read it. I picked up Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel, Ruth in a second hand bookshop, because well, I’d not seen another book called Ruth and that name’s special to me!
I’d like to think everyone out there could find a book with a name the same as theirs or a friend’s name. Or that it’s set in a place they know. Or it’s about how they are feeling and experiencing the world.
We love to say, ‘Yes! I feel exactly like that!’ It’s important in YA fiction for readers to be able to see characters and scenarios that you are going through so that you can see choices, solutions and how others cope with similar dilemmas.
And for books to be authentic, we need authors from diverse backgrounds, whether that be culturally, economically, socially, gender and sexual orientation, size, shape, skin colour, health-wise, in all ways. Personal experience makes a story ring true.
So…diverse writers need finding and encouraging. And how do we do that? Readers shouting what we want?! Writers writing about what’s important to them? And people in the publishing industry listening to that call.
With The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini, The Curious Incident of The Dog in The Night-Time all best-sellers, to name a few, and Meredith Rosso’s If I was your Girl, the first book written by a trans-gender author, the diverse stories featuring diverse characters are opening out. There are still many unheard voices out there of course.
I used my own experiences to write my YA novel, Jiddy Vardy, which is about a girl who is a foreigner in a tight knit community. I know my mum felt like this when we moved from the city of Bradford to a small rural village, when I was two. I felt like this when I was the only girl who went from my primary to secondary school. I could translate the feelings I felt to how Jiddy fought to belong.
One of the reasons, one of my main characters in my next book, The Monster Belt, is a redhead is because I am a redhead. Or, I should say, was – because my hair has changed colour, grown darker and duller over time. No actually, I change that back to ‘am.’ I am a redhead because I hold in me as an adult, all that being a redhead as a child and teenager has made me. And I’m not writing about a redhead that I so often see in fiction, plucky and fiery and not much said about her skin. Dee is a redhead who burns in the sun and I’m going to talk about it. And she is a brilliant character though I say so myself! There. Got that off my chest! Everyone needs representing and I have plenty of insider information on redheads. We want writers with plenty of insider information about their specialist subject! Because readers need to see themselves authentically in print.
There is also another reason why we need diversity in YA fiction… ‘no-one is an island.’ (Something my mum used to keep telling my sister and me.)
This can be translated as, we want and need to learn about other ways of being, other places and experiences, so that we can feel connected to everyone else. Reading outside our own experience and comfort zone helps us expand as human beings. We all want to grow and see other worlds, so that we can understand each other, don’t we?
Whichever way you look at it, it’s a win-win situation to have diversity in YA fiction. YA audiences are hungry to read about themselves and about different worlds and lives as well. And we need writers of all diversities to provide readers with that. So, publishers, nourish these writers. Please think long term and help these writers to grow and share their unique voices for all the unique readers out there.
And for those of you who don’t see anything for you right now, take up the challenge, pick up your pen, or start tapping on that keyboard and get writing yourself. There are organisations like We Need Diverse Books and Diversity in YA who work to give opportunities to those interested in publishing from minority backgrounds. Manchester’s new publishing company, ZunTold is engaging with young people through interactive story-telling on their website. Everywhere, there are initiatives. Find them. Let’s really make sure there is something for everyone and so readers can find a book they want to read.

RE
Ruth Estevez
Twitter
Website
ZunTold  – TwitterWebsite

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Anne Bonny #GuestPost #Promo #Kickstarter A Timeless Celebration by @DianneAscroft #CenturyCottageCozyMystery #Mystery

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Thank you for inviting me to your blog, Abby. I guess I should introduce myself to your readers. I’m Dianne Ascroft and I write historical and contemporary fiction. After writing historical fiction set during the Second World War for several years now, last summer I began writing my first cozy mystery, A Timeless Celebration.

Let me tell you a bit about the novel: When an artefact from the Titanic is stolen before her town’s 150th anniversary celebration, it’s up to Lois Stone to catch the thief. Middle-aged widow Lois has moved from bustling Toronto to tranquil Fenwater and is settling into her new life, feeling secure away from the dangers of the city. Then two events happen that shatter her serenity: her house is burgled and an antique watch belonging to a Titanic survivor is stolen from the local museum. Her best friend, Marge was responsible for the watch’s safekeeping until its official presentation to the museum at the town’s 150th anniversary party and its disappearance will jeopardise her job. Lois won’t let her friend’s reputation be tarnished or her job endangered by an accusation of theft. She’s determined to find the watch in time to save her best friend’s job and the town’s 150th anniversary celebration.

And so begins a week of new friends, apple and cinnamon muffins, calico cats, midnight intruders, shadowy caprine companions and more than one person with a reason to steal the watch, set against the backdrop of century houses on leafy residential streets, the swirling melodies of bagpipes, a shimmering heat haze and the burble of cool water. A Timeless Celebration is the story of Lois’s unwitting entry into the world of amateur sleuthing in a small town, which beckons readers to stop and stay a while.

As I mentioned, I started writing the novel last summer after a memory of home got the ball rolling. I’ve lived in Great Britain for almost three decades but I still have a strong connection to my birthplace, Canada. One really vivid image I have from home is of a quaint, small town with a sprightly river running through it where I’ve spent many happy hours. For several years, my mother was a resident of a nursing home in the town and each summer I flew over to spend a week with her. I pushed her wheelchair along the peaceful banks of the river in the nursing home grounds and we ate lunch at a nearby diner where the waitress always remembered my mother’s order. After I left my mother each day, I wandered along the main street, stopping at the squat, stone Carnegie Library to use the computer and leisurely browsing in the bookshop and numerous craft shops. I also wandered into the old fashioned clothing stores and the market housed in a barnlike building. In the evenings, as the air cooled and the sun sank lower in the sky, I strolled along streets shaded by mature oak and maple trees admiring the traditional stone architecture of the houses.

Everywhere I went people were friendly. They had time to chat and I discovered a sense of community that I hadn’t known in the huge city where I grew up. Whenever I think of the town, it always makes me smile, and one day last summer as I remembered times I had spent there, I realised it was the perfect place to set my new series. I loved the town and I was sure readers would find it a delightful place to be. So that was how the Century Cottage Cozy Mystery series began.

So now I’ve finished writing A Timeless Celebration and need to get it edited before it can go to print. But I need to raise the money to hire the editor as I am publishing the book myself. So I’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign to do this. Every pledge to pre-order a copy of the book (and other rewards) will take me a step closer to making the book happen. Please visit my Kickstarter page for more information.
Here’s the link

I’d be delighted if you’d join the other readers who are helping this book become a reality.

DA
Dianne Ascroft
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Kickstarter
Good luck Dianne

 

Anne Bonny #BlogTour #GuestPost – #Disability – A Spoke in The Wheel by @KathleenJowitt #ContemporaryFiction #Cycling

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A Spoke In The Wheel by Kathleen Jowitt
Synopsis:

The first thing I saw was the wheelchair.

The first thing she saw was the doper.

Ben Goddard is an embarrassment – as a cyclist, as an athlete, as a human being. And he knows it.

Now that he’s been exposed by a positive drugs test, his race wins and his work with disabled children mean nothing. He quits professional cycling in a hurry, sticks a pin in a map, and sets out to build a new life in a town where nobody knows who he is or what he’s done.

But when the first person he meets turns out to be a cycling fan, he finds out that it’s not going to be quite as easy as that.

Besides, Polly’s not just a cycling fan, she’s a former medical student with a chronic illness and strong opinions. Particularly when it comes to Ben Goddard…

Guest Post:

Virginia Woolf opens her 1925 essay On Being Ill with the following observation:

Considering how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed… it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love, battle, and jealousy among the prime themes of literature.

I’d like to take that further and say that, considering how many people are living with a disability or a chronic illness, it becomes strange how little that’s reflected in fiction

We’ve had didactic Victorian fiction, often with a miraculous cure at the end of the book; we’ve had the overwrought sensationalism of Me Before You; but we’ve had very little about ordinary disabled people just getting on with their life. Disabled characters tend to be saints or villains, with not much in between. And that doesn’t reflect the world that I see around me, or the people that I see around me.

I wouldn’t say that I deliberately set out to redress that balance: it just happened that way. A Spoke in the Wheel came out of a conversation I had with my partner as we watched the Vuelta A España: he observed that endurance athletes must be some of the few people to intuitively understand the ‘spoons’ analogy of disability. I started wondering how the circumstances would need to align for two people who had that first-hand experience to have that conversation. The book started there: Ben, a professional cyclist, meets Polly, a disabled fan.

Then I started thinking about the other thing that disabled people and professional cyclists have in common: the assumptions people make about them, the hurtful, damaging assumptions that cyclists are doping to win, and that disabled people are faking it to get benefits. That went into the pot, too. (Since it’s made clear in the first two chapters, I don’t mind telling you now. He’s a cheat. She isn’t.)

I’m not physically disabled myself so I was very keen to ensure that I portrayed Polly’s ME in a sensitive and accurate manner. Joanne Harris’ Twitter thread on Ten Things About Writing Medical Conditions [link here: https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/979331230318686208.html%5D came just as I’d approved the final proofs of A Spoke in the Wheel, but it demonstrates very well the approach that I tried to take, particularly tweets 6, 7 and 8. Polly is much more than her disability, but her disability affects her life in all sorts of ways. She absolutely has a leading role. And there are no miracle cures, and no saccharine deathbed scenes in this book.

And I can’t tell you how grateful I am to my friends who read the manuscript and said things like, ‘No, if he’s going to pick her prescription up for her then he’ll need a signed letter…’ Or, indeed, ‘Haha, yes, that’s happened to me several times!’ Not to mention the one who took her wheelchair to pieces so that I could photograph one of the wheels for the front cover…

KJpic
Kathleen Jowitt
Twitter
Website

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ASITW blog tour individual 17 May