Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview You’ll Never See Me Again by @LesleyPearse 5* #NewRelease #Coastal #Historical #Saga #LoveLesley @MichaelJBooks

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You’ll Never See Me Again by Lesley Pearse
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

You have to keep running if you want to survive . . .

When her husband returns shell-shocked and broken from the Great War and his mother makes her life a misery, Betty Wellow discovers how bitter and hard life can truly be. But it is not until a devastating storm sweeps through their small fishing village and endangers her life, that she sees her chance to escape – and takes it.

Fleeing to Bristol, she changes her name to Mabel Brook and takes a position as a maid. But tragedy strikes once more after the sudden death of her mistress and she is cast back onto the streets.

Penniless and alone Mabel suffers a brutal attack before being rescued by a psychic named Nora Nightingale. There she gets her first taste of those who receive messages from the dead and realises she may have this gift herself.

But it isn’t long before Mabel receives her own message and is forced back to the very place she has escaped. A place of heartbreak and perhaps even murder – but Mabel realises that to secure her future she must confront her past one last time.

My Review ~

I am a HUGE Lesley Pearse fangirl. My favourite title is Remember Me which covers the historical fleets of the convicts being shipped to Australia. I would urge anyone and everyone to read it. Especially if you are fans of TV shoes such as Banished or Jamestown which also deal with the theme of British Colonies.

You’ll Never See Me Again deals with some incredibly deep and emotive issues but it is ultimately the story of the protagonist Betty Wellows later known as Mabel Brook. A title I have read lately of a similar summary would be Those Who Are loved by Victoria Hislop. Although this title is set along the Southern coasts of England.

The novel opens in Devon 1917, with Betty battling with her forbidding mother-in-law Agnes. Betty’s husband and childhood sweetheart, Martin has returned from the great war, with severe shell shock and is no longer able to verbally communicate. Betty’s life is now being ran by matriarch Agnes. Whom controls every aspect of betty’s existence.

‘I don’t know what my son ever saw in you’

One Stormy evening, when Betty can’t take the verbal abuse anymore, she makes a rash decision to flee. Leaving behind her, her husband and her miserable life as Betty Fellows.
Betty’s life story is explained and I really felt for the character, she had known so much heartache, so young.
She is determined to start again, a new life, as Mabel Brook.

‘You’ll never see me again’

She ends up in Bristol, although she fears the big city life. The guest house of Mrs Halliwell’s is filled with warmth and kindness. But Mabel fears exposure, as local articles surface of her assumed dead back in Devon.

‘She’d thought she was heading for an adventure, something better than she had before, but it seemed it was going to be far worse’

Mabel moves around and in turn we are introduced to a wide variety of characters. I became quickly and happily wrapped up in the story of Mabel’s future and her quest to finally be free!

‘Holding bitterness inside you isn’t good for anyone’

Lesley Pearse is on fire, as always! 5*

LP
Lesley Pearse
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Anne Bonny #BookReview The Woman In The Wood by @LesleyPearse #TheWomanInTheWood #LoveLesley @ed_pr @MichaelJBooks ‘This saga novel is very dark in places, it deals with some heavy and emotive themes. But above all else it is a story of families, survival and hope!’

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The Woman In The Wood by Lesley Pearse
Review copy
Synopsis:

London, 1960

The lives of teenage twins Maisy and Duncan change forever the night their sick mother is taken to an asylum. Sent to live in the New Forest with their cold-hearted grandmother, Mrs Mitcham, they feel unloved and abandoned.

And when one day Duncan doesn’t come home from exploring in the forest, no one – least of all his grandmother – appears to care about his disappearance. The police, who’ve found the bodies of other missing boys, offer little hope of finding Duncan alive.

Yet Maisy refuses to give up. Though she doesn’t know the woods well, she knows someone who does. The strange old woman who lives at their heart.

Dare Maisy enlist the help of the woman in the wood?

My Review:

I am a huge fan of Lesley Pearse. I still remember fondly the emotional rollercoaster that was, Remember me and it was 16yrs ago that I read it. She has such a wealth of novels in her back catalogue now, I wonder how she finds inspiration for new plot lines and characters. When I originally picked up The Woman In The wood, the cover and synopsis has an almost Hansel and Gretel feel to it.
I will say this, this is the darkest novel I have ever read by Lesley Pearse. I was quite taken aback in parts.

The novel opens in West London 1960, twins Maisy and Duncan witness their mother being taken from the house in the middle of the night. They are aware that she is destined for the asylum and are unsure of what their futures hold. Their mother Lily has been bed bound since a riding accident 12yrs ago. However, we the reader become aware Lily’s infirmity is not physical but more mental health.

The twins are eventually taken by their father Alastair to his mother’s home Nightingales, in the New Forest. Grandma Mitcham is what I would call a cantankerous battle axe. She is cold in her approach and demeanour towards the children and they find sanctuary in the arms of housekeeper Janice.
The twin’s father is also cold and distant; and it is clear to see that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

‘Even our parents don’t like us much’ – Maisy

Despite the upheaval and bleak future. The twins like most children are resilient. They learn to make the most of their new life at Nightingales. Duncan loves to explore the wilderness of their remote, isolated location. The begin to spy on local recluse Grace and have lessons with Mr Dove. Mr Dove is a wheelchair bound veteran of ww2, who despite the challenges he has faced in life, remains to hold a positive outlook on life. He even attempts to get them to understand their father better. By teaching them about parenting and learnt behaviour. Although at times this seems wasted on Maisy who remains angry at her parent’s behaviour.

‘Maybe her accident has always been just an excuse o stay away from everyone’ – Maisy

Mr Donald Grainger is a regular visitor to the estate. He is Grandma Mitcham’s solicitor. He advises her when she spitefully decides to disinherit Alastair, choosing Duncan to inherit, her wealth and land. My Grainger is the only person aside from Janice that we see, who appears to tolerate Grandma Mitcham. She is often spiteful and nasty in her character assassinations of others, especially the twin’s mother Lily.

Duncan eventually builds up the courage to conversate with Grace and a friendship of weekly visits blossoms.
When Duncan goes missing, she is Maisy’s first port of call. . .

‘Do you know, he’s the only person I’ve talked to properly in ten years or more. I frightened everyone else off’ – Grace

With Grandma Mitcham and her father refusing to take Duncan’s disappearance seriously. Maisy must strike out on her own and find clues. When her grandmother forbids her from anymore searches. Her father slaps her and blames her for Duncan’s disappearance. Maisy decides to leave Nightingales and take a role as nanny in Brighton.
It’ll be many years before she returns. . . .

‘It’s difficult to respect someone who shows no interest in you’ – Maisy

In the two years of Maisy’s absence there has been the discovery of several bodies of missing boys. Maisy decides once and for all, she needs closure. She returns to Nightingales, seeking to find her twins body, giving him the proper burial he deserves.

Maisy and Grace meet again; and we learn more of Grace’s background and why she lives so reclusively. They form an unlikely pair of investigators. But between the twin’s bond and their bond with Grace they set out to bring Duncan home.

This saga novel is very dark in places, it deals with some heavy and emotive themes. But above all else it is a story of families, survival and hope! 5*

LP
Lesley Pearse
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Twitter
My review of, Dead To me