Anne Bonny #Author Q&A with @monro_m276 Mary Monro #StrangerInMyHeart #NonFiction #NewRelease #WW2 #Biography #Extract

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Stranger In My Heart by Mary Monro
Review to follow
Synopsis:

John Monro MC never mentioned his Second World War experiences, leaving his daughter Mary with unresolved mysteries when he died in 1981. He fought at the Battle of Hong Kong, made a daring escape across Japanese-occupied China and became Assistant Military Attaché in Chongqing. Caught up in Far East war strategy, he proposed a bold plan to liberate the PoWs he’d left behind before fighting in Burma in 1944. But by the time Mary was born he’d become a Shropshire farmer, revealing nothing of his heroic past.

Thirty years after his death and prompted by hearing him described as a ‘20th Century great’, Mary began her quest to explore this stranger she’d called ‘Dad’. Stranger In My Heart skilfully weaves poignant memoir with action-packed biography and travels in modern China in a reflective journey that answers the question we all eventually ask ourselves: ‘Who am I?’

Q&A:

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new book?

Biography
I have written numerous technical and academic articles and I am an experienced lecturer and presenter, but this is my first book. I live in Bath and practice as an osteopath treating humans of all ages as well as animals, mostly horses and dogs. I was formerly a marketing consultant and began my marketing career with Cadbury’s confectionery. I enjoy learning languages and studied Mandarin before retracing Dad’s escape route across China. I would say that I reached toddler level (some spoken language but unable to write), which was surprisingly useful.
I was born and raised at a farm on the edge of the south Shropshire hills, the youngest of four children. I spent much of my childhood on horseback, which left me with permanent damage to my right eye, a broken nose, broken knee-cap and broken coccyx. I have been bitten, kicked, rolled on, dragged, and have fallen off too many times to recall, but I still ride racehorses for fun.

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

Well you’d better make a cup of tea and sit down – that was a long journey! Initially I was just exploring my father’s life and trying to process his loss. Then I became spellbound by China and decided to recreate my father’s escape route from Hong Kong to Chongqing. I was reluctant to go to a country where I don’t speak the language, so I spent a couple of years learning Mandarin. When I eventually arrived in China (5 years into the journey) I wrote a blog to keep everyone back home up to date with my travels. The trip raised as many questions as it answered and made me realise that my experience might resonate with a wider audience. People who’d lost their parent at a young age; people who want to understand how their personality was shaped by their forbears; or people who have a war hero undiscovered in their past. I delved further into the context of Dad’s story and decided to turn it into a book. Eventually I had a manuscript that I was happy with and tried to find a publisher, some hen’s teeth and a unicorn. Unbound generously picked me up when everyone else had rejected me and a year later, after a brilliant edit, here we are!

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

In no particular order these are some of my favourite books: The Silk Roads by Peter Frankopan, The Heart of the Hunter by Laurens van der Post, Oryx & Crake by Margaret Atwood, Perfect Summer by Barbara Kingsolver, West with the Night by Beryl Markham, The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson, The Web of Life by Fritjof Capra, A Pattern of Islands by Arthur Grimble, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown, Women Who Run With The Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola-Estes, The Descent of Man by Grayson Perry.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

My reading was mostly pony related as a child (Ruby Ferguson, Anna Sewell) along with magical books such as AA Milne’s Winnie the Pooh, Gerald Durrell’s The Talking Parcel and Kipling’s Just So Stories. I became a bit more adventurous as a teenager and was lucky to live in a home where interesting reads were left lying about as hand me downs from my parents or older siblings. I’ve always had a thing about justice and, looking back, a lot of my reading in my late teens was about justice for the underprivileged, minorities and the planet. I was also exploring epistemology (not that I knew what that meant at the time), seeking guidance on how to think and what to think about. I also read a ton of other books but in the ensuing 35 years I have forgotten most of them – these writers are some that have stood the test of memory: John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Alan Paton, John Irving, Robert Pirsig, Joseph Heller, AS Byatt, Margaret Atwood, Jan Morris, Fritjof Capra, Laurens van der Post, Nadine Gordimer, Franz Kafka, Voltaire, Albert Camus, George Orwell, Tom Wolfe, Maya Angelou.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

I am overwhelmed by the reviews I have received – knowledgeable book lovers who don’t know me writing lovely, insightful things about my book. It seems miraculous!

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

My husband Julian Caldecott, who is a brilliant writer himself, has been endlessly supportive and encouraging and didn’t even mind when I took off to China without him! I also have to give a special mention to my fellow authors at the Unbound Social Club (our Facebook Group) who happily support, advise, listen, share and inspire in equal measure. They are the best bunch of mates I’ve never met and I doubt I’d have survived the process without them. Being an author is a lonely business and I have author friends, with traditional publishers, who have been rightly envious of the Unbound community.

*Thank you for taking part in the Q&A on my blog, I wish you every success with your writing career.

Extract from Stranger In My Heart (final chapter):

And who am I? Apart from being immensely proud of my father and even more upset than before that he’s not here to talk to, I have an expanded sense of self. Since completing my journeys to China and writing this book, I have become more confident of my place in the world. I am doing more writing and teaching, speaking up. I have something to say and the confidence to say it. It seems that reliving my father’s experiences has added a perceptible strength to my being. As though the flow of courage from parent to child was interrupted in its flight but has now landed. At last I understand and can internalise the Monro family motto – alis et animo – wings and courage, indeed.

So many of us share this experience – the loss of a parent or grandparent without knowing them as a person rather than just as a role. We often don’t realise that their life contributes to ours in diverse and subtle ways; that if we had had the opportunity to really talk with them, they could have taught us so much about ourselves . The generation who saw the Second World War are steadily leaving us and they have a tendency to remain silent about their experiences. This reserve seems to me to be modest and protective, preserving their own sanity and hiding horror from us like a clutch of deadly eggs under a serene and soft-feathered facade.

The modern habit of sharing every thought and feeling is alien to them at the least, offensive at worst. But this is an enormous loss to us, even if we don’t fully appreciate it. Those who were non-combatants have just as much to teach us about resilience in adversity and how to live well in difficult times. The two-minute silence on Remembrance Sunday helps to make many people pause and reflect, and maybe, now that research is so much easier to do, it will also encourage more people to enrich their lives by delving further into their family history. Bereavement is never easy, but it has been truly joyful getting to know Dad and feeling the full force of his personality. It’s been like falling in love.

MM
Mary Monro
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Anne Bonny #BookReview Songs Of Innocence by @Anne_Coates1 #NewRelease #CrimeFiction #Thriller #HannahWeybridge @urbanebooks ‘Perfect for fans of crime fiction who like a female driven, ambitious and feisty protagonist’

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Songs Of Innocence by Anne Coates
Review Copy
Synopsis:

A woman’s body is found in a lake. Is it a sad case of suicide or something more sinister? Hannah Weybridge, still reeling from her friend’s horrific murder and the attempts on her own life, doesn’t want to get involved, but reluctantly agrees to look into the matter for the family.

The past however still stalks her steps, and a hidden danger accompanies her every move.

The third in the bestselling Hannah Weybridge thriller series, Songs of Innocence provides Hannah with her toughest and deadliest assignment yet…

My Review:

Songs Of Innocence is the third novel in the Hannah Weybridge series. The novels are set in the 1990s and Hannah is an investigative journalist. She is feisty and independent. She is never afraid to tackle and expose the toughest crimes.

This particular novel focuses on a series of murders of several young women. The first murder is nearly misjudged a suicide. It is only at the involvement of Hannah and her request of a second post mortem; the truth is brought to light.

The murders involve several young women of the local Asian community. Hannah is brought in by the family of Amalia Kumar. Her aunt Sunita is furious at the police’s lack of interest in the case and urges Hannah to help her get justice for Amalia.

‘An Asian girl getting herself killed isn’t top of their priorities, is it?’ – Sunita Kumar

The racism and prejudice faced by the Asian community is fully explored within the novel. I did find this quite eye-opening that in many ways Asian women are still fighting for equal rights in 2018. With issues that they face in their communities often being politicalised; with no real legal repercussions imposed (FGM).

When more bodies are discovered, it becomes clear there is a killer in their midst and he is targeting a specific demographic. Is this the work of a serial killer? Is there a form of cultural basis? The police and Hannah are struggling for clues.

The author has included a wide-range of culture and diversity, whilst also maintaining an honest to the era. Society understood far less back then, than it does now.
Forced marriage is explored, as is Rana’s story of domestic abuse. The novel opened by eyes, to the struggle other generations of women have faced.

The professional trust and relationship between the police and the press, is what makes it for me. Something we will sadly see little of, in the future.

Perfect for fans of crime fiction who like a female driven, ambitious and feisty protagonist. Hannah Weybridge is for you! 5*

AC
Anne Coates
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Anne Bonny #BookReview Once A Pilgrim by @jamesdeeganMC James Deegan 5* Genius #NewRelease #SAS #Action #Thriller @HQstories ‘John Carr is probably the closest to realism as you can get’

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Once A Pilgrim by James Deegan
Review copy
Synopsis:

John Carr has recently left the SAS, after a long and distinguished career, and is now working for a Russian oligarch in the murky world of private security.

But an incident from his past – in which three terrorists were brutally killed – suddenly comes back to haunt him.

Tracked by a hitman out for revenge, John Carr is forced to step over the line to defend himself and his family. It’s a cruel and violent world – and one he thought he’d left behind.

But some wars never end.

Patriot Games meets Taken: In Once A Pilgrim, John Carr shows all the Reacher-esque hallmarks of a cold-blooded antihero doing what needs to be done, whatever the consequences.

My Review:

Once A Pilgrim is the action-packed debut novel, of ex-SAS author James Deegan. I am not a huge follower of the action/thriller genre. But I really liked the sound of this novel. Add in the realism and fine details of military life and it is no wonder this is an Amazon bestseller.
He who dares, most definitely wins!

The novel opens with John ‘Mad John’ Carr’s CV. It details his military background, family history and current role. Carr is a decorated soldier, but with his gruff Scottish accent will tell you himself he isn’t in it for the medals. He has been wounded in battle and bears the scars of his past. He has sacrificed his marriage for his career, as many soldiers do. He has lost comrades and his own brother in action in Afghanistan.
Basically, John Carr makes one hell of a protagonist!

The novel opens during a tour of Iraq. With Sgt Major John Carr on his final op, before he signs the papers that’ll send him into civvie street. On the streets of Baghdad, his decision to leave the SAS weighs heavy on his conscience. However, he must not lose focus in the objective to retrieve/kill Sufyan Bin Ahmed aka Joker. The target is an Al Qaeda member and it falls to Carr’s team to take him out dead or alive.

‘Carr would have stepped through the gates of hell with Geordie by his side, and the feeling was mutual’

At Carr’s side is Squadron Quarter Master Sgt Geordie Skelton and new boy ‘Rooney’. They are aware Joker is planning to detonate a bomb in a civilian area of the central Shia district of Sadr city. Time is of the essence. Yet the spooks want the foot soldiers to take, their time and take Joker alive. The area has already been subject to religious cleansing and emotions and motives are fraught. When Carr’s team come under enemy fire from a separate insurgent attack nearby.

The opening scene is insanely tense. The team are left with one casualty of war, one wounded and a dead Joker. This all takes place in just six minutes. It full reminds the reader of the important work the SAS carry out and the risks they take with every breath of their operations.

The novel then jumps forward six months, with Carr now getting out, attending a comrade’s funeral and finalising his divorce. He has a job lined up for a private oil security firm in Southern Iraq. Carr wants to earn some decent money for a change. But as he leaves the base, he is approached by various high-ranking officials and he reflects upon the opportunities afforded to him in his military career.

‘The Army has given him discipline and focus, and turned him into a man’

There are various times within the narrative, Carr reflects upon the various people that make up the squadron. The individuals from all walks of life. From the poverty of Edinburgh to the boarding schools of Eton. The military caters to all.
It is as he is leaving that privileged Major General Guy De Vere (Director of special forces) reminds Carr of their time together in Clonards. Instantly we are transported back to Carr’s memory of that night. . .

Belfast, Northern Ireland 20yrs ago to be precise. A young ambitious Lance Cpl John Carr is with Cpl Mick ‘Scouse’ Parry and new boy De Vere as they patrol the open war zone that is the streets of Northern Ireland.

In this narrative we also see the points of view of Gerard Casey, his brother ‘sick Sean’ Casey and Ciaren O’Brien. They make up a small team of IRA with a target in mind. Their target William ‘Billy’ Jones, son of a Ulster volunteer and currently dating a Catholic girl named Colleen. Billy is no threat to them, their cause or NI in general. Billy wants out of NI and the troubles altogether. But due to who his father is, he is a named target. It is a night of violence and retribution which will echo well into the future and present day.

‘He’d dealt with bad men and worse jobs in every continent, but nowhere felt like Belfast’

London, present day: Whilst John Carr is sleeping off the effects of the night before. Senior officials are meeting to discuss the possible trial of British soldiers after the death of Gerard Casey. With new evidence from a witness come forward after 20yrs and a dying mans confessions. The officials discuss whether they should take this case further and bring criminal charges.

‘This sounds awfully like throwing two innocent men to the wolves’ – Kevin Murphy

The officials discuss the potential risks to the soldiers, media containment, press exposure and risks to soldier’s families of reprisals. Despite everything considered they decide to push ahead.
It is a decision that will have devastating consequences for John Carr.

‘He hadn’t wanted this fight – it had come looking for him but he was in it, and he had to win it’

The debate of putting British soldiers on trials for the actions in Northern Ireland, has been a played out in the media not so long ago. How senior government officials can sleep in the safety of their beds; as they sanction such cases is beyond my understanding. A comfy sleep that is afforded to them by the action of those who make untold sacrifices.

The realism and accuracy of military life is brilliant and second to none. I personally have no experience of the SAS. I married into the military way of life at 17yrs old and my husband was an airborne soldier. I recognised several terms such as ‘seven P’s’ and ‘ally’. But the fact that the soldiers were drinking brews and chatting bantz on page 4 of the novel, was a dead giveaway this is the real deal! The nicknames, the way in which the soldiers spoke to one another and the unspoken brotherhood are all clear indicators of a novel laced with intense accuracy.

This novel is gripping, with a clever plot that will be the envy of most crime writers. There are twists and tension along the way! John Carr is probably the closest to realism as you can get. Highly recommended 5* Genius

James Deegan – Twitter

Anne Bonny #BookReview Smoke And Ashes by @radiomukhers Abir Mukherjee 5* Genius #NewRelease #Historical #CrimeFiction #Calcutta @HarvillSecker ‘Outstanding historical crime fiction, that I would love to see adapted for the TV screens’

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Smoke And Ashes by Abir Mukherjee 
Review copy
Synopsis:

**From the winner of the 2017 CWA Historical Dagger Award**

India, 1921. Haunted by his memories of the Great War, Captain Sam Wyndham is battling a serious addiction to opium that he must keep secret from his superiors in the Calcutta police force.

When Sam is summoned to investigate a grisly murder, he is stunned at the sight of the body: he’s seen this before. Last night, in a drug addled haze, he stumbled across a corpse with the same ritualistic injuries. It seems like there’s a deranged killer on the loose. Unfortunately for Sam, the corpse was in an opium den and revealing his presence there could cost him his career.

With the aid of his quick-witted Indian Sergeant, Surrender-not Banerjee, Sam must try to solve the two murders, all the while keeping his personal demons secret, before somebody else turns up dead.

Set against the backdrop of the fervent fight for Indian independence, and rich with the atmosphere of 1920s Calcutta, Smoke and Ashes is the brilliant new historical mystery in this award-winning series.

My Review:

I am a huge fan of this series and If you haven’t read A Rising Man or A Necessary Evil, then you need to add them to your wish list asap. The series is phenomenal and historical crime fiction at its finest. It was my 126th read of the year so far and the 13th edition to the 5* Genius list. The era, characters and location that Abir Mukherjee has created within the series is sheer brilliance.
*I am a shameless fangirl*

The series is set post ww1 in Calcutta, India. The main characters are British Captain Sam Wyndham and Indian Sgt (Surrender-not) Banerjee. The novels are historical fiction, but there is always a grisly crime to be unearthed in the British Raj. I must admit that with this novel, I really felt the historical aspect of the novel had stepped up its game. The depth of historical detail really added to the story. India’s social and political climate is described in a fantastic method, letting the characters lead the scenes.
This is not a history lesson; the author simply invites you into 1921 Calcutta.

The novel opens with Sam fleeing the Imperial police force, blade in hand and covered in blood. He is fleeing a Tangra opium den and is certainly feeling the effects, shall we say. I began to wonder how bad is Sam’s opium addiction?
Is Sam going to be the murderer in this case?

‘Calcutta opium is best smoked ten feet below the corpses of half a dozen dead men’

Despite the police in pursuit, after the raid on the opium den, Sam manages to escape. But he can’t get out of his mind the dead body of the Chinese man he found. Why was the body so disfigured? Was this an opium ‘pipe dream’? Why was Commanding Officer Callaghan of Vice division raiding the den? Sam has so many questions as he falls asleep in a drug induced haze.

‘Calcutta was as flawed and dysfunctional as I was’ – Sam

When he awakes, late, as usual for Sam now. He finds Surrender-not has already left for work. He lights a cigarette and ponders his next course of action, over the body he found.

‘The Chinese were a law unto themselves. What they did to each other was none of my business’

In the background of the novel is the political protests of Mahatma Gandhi. It would appear the natives have tired of British rule and long for independence. Tempers are frayed, and the jails are full. With an impending visit from H.R.H Prince Edward scheduled for Christmas Day. Sam and surrender-not must ensure the streets are free from protestors.
Which will be no easy task, at all.

Lord Taggart, commissioner of the police for Bengal summons Sam to his office. He orders Sam and Surrender-not to deliver a message to Gandhi’s ‘chief rabble rouser’ – C.R Das that the organisation of congress volunteers is now banned. There are clear and spiteful threats issued, the natives must obey their British masters.

The theme of the British Raj and colonisation in general, makes this novel perfect for book groups. There are so many elements to debate. It is also easy to look back with the wisdom of hindsight. I spend many summer days at Osbourne House the summer home of Queen Victoria. It has an Indian room and there is evidence of Indian artefacts throughout. Queen Victoria was clearly impressed and inspired by Indian culture. I find it surprising that a culture for which she found so fascinating, she never visited. . .

Back to the novel and Sam. Not only is Sam battling his emotional past, with the loss of his wife Sarah. Annie makes a reappearance and he has an out of control opiate addiction. He eventually agrees to see a doctor and deal with his opiate addiction once and for all.

‘I preferred not to be reminded of the ghosts of Christmas past’ – Sam

With Das refusing to give in to Taggart’s demands. Sam is placed in the awkward position of delivering messages he no longer believes in or agrees with. . .

‘Tell him that I’ve no issue with arresting him, his family and every one of his supporters’ – Taggart

The British are in the difficult position of wanting to coerce the opposition via threats and intimidation and not wanting to make martyrs of them.
There will be no easy solution in British India.

Sam and Surrender-not are called to a crime scene at Shant-da’s medical clinic. Where they find the body of a young nurse Ruth Fernandez. Ruth’s corpse has the identical injuries as the Chinese victim at the opium den. But what links the murders? Ruth is a native from Goa but holds the role of military nurse. She openly practises her Christian faith. Are these murders political?
Has the non-violent protest suddenly turned to murder?

With the new murder and political tensions at an all time high, the British issue a military enforced curfew of 6pm. At times it felt that they did everything they could, to ignite the flames of riots.
Leaving Sam battling his personal opinions and professional responsibilities.

‘Maybe my penance was a life sentence’ – Sam

When another murder occurs, it is clear Calcutta has a serial killer on its hands and only one man knows the truth. Sam.

As said above the historical aspects are beautifully written and there is so much detail. Each political event, is broken down to be shown from both sides of the governmental powers. I wondered how the author would tackle the character of Gandhi and his political stance. What you discover is that Gandhi was a highly intelligent man, with a strategic mind. He meticulously planned his protests and lived by his convictions.
But I love the way Sam summarises the situation (and some of the finest writing might I add) . . .

‘To see a man as your enemy, you needed to hate him, and while it was easy to hate a man who fought you with bullets and bombs, it was bloody difficult to hate a man who opposed you by appealing to your moral compass’ – Sam

I was sad to see Surrender-not, firmly return to his role of side-kick. In the last novel I really felt his character gain such presence. Despite it being difficult to watch an intelligent man (must) take a back-seat to the British rule. Yet I respect the author for changing the style of each novel, keeping you the reader guessing and avoiding the huge error of repeating the same novel with just a different case.

Outstanding historical crime fiction, that I would love to see adapted for the TV screens. I can even picture the atmospheric opening credits, as we glance around 1920s Calcutta. 5* Genius.

AM
Abir Mukherjee
Twitter
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My review and Q&A for, A Rising Man
My review and Q&A for, A Necessary Evil

Anne Bonny #BlogBlitz #BookReview & #GuestPost #TheKillingTime by @WriterMJLee #NewRelease #Historical #Mystery 1930s #Shanghai #InspectorDanilov #Series @canelo_co

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The Killing Time by M J Lee – Inspector Danilov #4
Review copy
Synopsis:

As tensions simmer in Shanghai, children go missing…

Shanghai 1932: Inspector Danilov hasn’t recovered from the death of his child… but across a Shanghai riven with communal tensions, children are going missing.

Missing, and then murdered. Who is responsible? Why have the children’s bodies been exhibited for all to see?

Just as Danilov thinks the stakes couldn’t be higher there is a new dimension, Japan, a rising power flexing its muscles. In fractious Shanghai, an explosion is long overdue. With the clock ticking can Danilov and his assistant Strachan solve the case? The fate of Shanghai may be at stake. So is Danilov’s job… And his sanity.

My Review:

The Killing Time is set in Shanghai 1932, the year of the golden goat. I was instantly drawn to the era and location, as I am a huge fan of historical fiction. The novel opens with DS Strachan and Dr Fang at the autopsy of an unknown 13yr old boy. The child has a mutilated face and his right ear has been removed. He died via manual strangulation and was dumped at a building site. He shows no signs of sexual assault and his only identifiable feature is a strawberry birthmark.
It is a case that throws up more questions than answers. What is the motive? Why was he dumped at the building site? Who is he? Is someone targeting children?

‘This one is extremely personal, Inspector. Our victim, whatever his name is, will have been looking straight into the eyes of his killer as he died’ – Dr Fang

Locally students are protesting the Japanese occupation of Manchurita. Calling for others and shopkeepers to boycott Japanese trade. Thugs hassle shopkeepers and it becomes clear the ‘protest’ may require a police presence.
The novel further explores the political situation and expands to explain about the local gangs that operate.

Inspector Danilov is also experiencing his own personal grief and pain at the loss of his son Ivan; just 2yrs ago. The bereavement seems to be a driving force in his search for justice for the victims of this insane killer.

The novel is a complex murder mystery, with the reveal of the culprit at the end a brilliant piece of writing. Almost Columbo in style. The novel comprises of short, sharp and to the point chapters, which I like. The descriptions of Shanghai as a location are interesting. I think the novel could have benefitted from more female characters. It was comprised of nearly an entire male cast.

A complex mystery with elements of culture. 4*

Guest Post: by M J Lee

Is Shanghai the perfect place to set a crime novel?

Thanks for this opportunity to talk about myself and the Danilov novels. It’s something I love doing almost as much as I love writing the books.

I remember very clearly when the idea for writing a novel set in the Shanghai of the 1920s and 1930s came to me.

I was out strolling one evening in Shanghai (we were living in the city at that time). It was around dusk in October, one of the best times of the year in the city. Perfect walking weather. I reached the crossroads at Jiangxi Middle Road and Fuzhou Road, just opposite the Metropole Hotel. A square where four Art Deco buildings built in the 1930s meet. For a moment, there was no traffic and no people, a strange occurrence in a city of over twenty million people. I closed my eyes and was suddenly transported back to the 1920s, imagining old Dodges, Packards and Chevrolets rolling up to the hotel, discharging carloads of flappers and elegant men wearing tuxedos.
A lovely moment, trapped in time.

The Inspector Danilov books were born. And what a time to write about. Back then, the city of ‘joy, gin and jazz’ was an amazing melting pot of adventurers, spies, triads, opium smugglers, merchants, con-men, communists, criminals, fascists, Japanese miltarists, gamblers and refugees. With such a witches cauldron of deceit and double-dealing, happiness and despair, wealth and poverty, it soon became obvious that only a crime novel, with its strong moral compass, could explore the depths of the abyss that was Shanghai.

The two main characters, Detective Inspector Danilov and Detective Sergeant Strachan, are both outsiders, in a society full of outsiders. They are employed by the Shanghai Municipal Police but distanced and separate from the rest of their colleagues, and from the society of the time. Mavericks are always so much more interesting to read about and to write. The choice of Danilov as the lead in the books actually came from a line in a policeman’s memoir of the time. He mentioned that when they had a problem, both the French and Shanghai police turned to White Russian members of their forces to solve it for them.

So far, four books in the series have been published. The latest The Killing Time is set in Shanghai 1932, in the days before the Japanese invaded the city for the first time. It’s apart of the series but can be read as a standalone novel.

MJL
M J Lee
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***Don’t miss the other blogger on the blog blitz***
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