Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview The Copycat by Jake Woodhouse @wildgundog 4* #NewRelease #PoliceProcedural #Amsterdam @PenguinUKBooks #Series #JaapRykel

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The Copycat by Jake Woodhouse
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Synopsis ~

HE THOUGHT HE CAUGHT THE KILLER, BUT THEN THE KILLING DIDN’T STOP

Jaap Rykel is on the brink, his dark past driving him to breaking point and ending his police career.

Visiting the station one last time, he stumbles across an investigation into a violent murder.

A murder where the details exactly match a case he solved years earlier.

But that killer was caught – and is still in prison.

Is there a copycat killer on the loose, playing games with Rykel’s fragile mind? Or did he get it wrong, and send an innocent man to prison?

This might be his last chance to make things right, or it could be the blow that finally takes him over the edge . . .

My Review ~

Inspector Jaap Rykel is a controversial police officer. He is recently retired due to a psychotic breakdown. He lives his life suffering flashbacks and within the firm grip of PTSD. When Inspector Arno Jansen contacts him for some assistance regarding a case, eerily similar to one previously worked on by Rykel…

‘Killing just to imitate another murderer indicates a special kind of warped mind’

The present case dealing with the murder of Marianne Kleine, draws comparison to the Lucie Muller case from Rykel’s past. Are the victim’s connected? And what does this mean for Lucie’s convicted murder, currently serving a 30yr prison term?

Lucie Muller’s case was high profile due to the nature of her murder and her father’s position within Dutch society. Her father Judge Muller is a tough and ruthless criminal Judge, taking little pity on  those who end up in his courtroom. When Rykel begins to question his findings in the previous case. He not only questions did Sander Klaasen really commit murder? But was the speed from arrest to conviction just far too easy?

The title is a gritty police procedural dealing with the central theme of Rykel’s guilty conscious and search for redemption. It is a complex case and covers various concerts of Dutch law and political policies. The author cleverly describes (and explains) these aspects as you read along. 4*

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Jake Woodhouse
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Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview After He’s Gone by @JaneIsaacAuthor #CrimeFiction #NewRelease ‘This novel is a great start to a thoroughly modern new series. It has a diverse multitude of characters and plenty of secrets and lies, to keep you guessing’

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After He’s Gone by Jane Isaac – DC Beth Chamberlain #1
Review copy
Synopsis:

You think you know him. Until he’s dead.

When Cameron Swift is gunned down outside his family home, DC Beth Chamberlain is appointed Family Liaison Officer: a dual role that requires her to support the family, and also investigate them.

As the case unfolds and the body count climbs, Beth discovers that nothing is quite as it appears and everyone, it seems, has secrets.

Even the dead…

My Review:

After He’s Gone is the debut novel in an exciting new series from author Jane Isaac. It centres around the role of DC Beth Chamberlain as family liaison officer; to murder victim Cameron Swift’s family. I loved the angle and narrative of a FLO’s role covering both support and investigation.

‘To kill an adult was gruesome enough. But a child? That was pure unadulterated evil’

The novel opens with an eerie scene of violence. We are left unsure, what it relates to and straightaway this adds to the mystery. The novel then jumps to seven days earlier and the scene of Cameron Swift’s murder. Cameron is hot in broad daylight by a killer on a bike, who tops long enough to take pictures of the victim.

Is this a professional hit? If so who wants to kill Cameron Swift?

Beth is called to the scene with ‘career copper’ DCI Lee. They find the body of Cameron and see 3 shots fired. They immediately begin to search the area for witnesses and organise the CCTV to be obtained. The novel is quite police procedural, in parts.

Cameron Swift was an asset manager, with what appears to be no enemies. His partner Monika and two sons were inside the property at the time of the shooting. Monika assists the police as much as possible. But you can fully grasp her emotional state. Monika is Polish, and her family remain in her native country. Meaning Monika is alone with young sons Oskar (12yrs) and baby Jakub (9 months). I really felt for Monika’s plight and could just imagine the sheer hopelessness of her situation and grief.

The killer posts the photos to social media. The police struggle to grasp why. Is the killer sending a message? Is this an attempt to gain attention? It isn’t too long until the caption ‘Who was #Cameronswift?’ is trending.

So, who was Cameron swift?

Beth has to navigate an intense police investigation, a grieving partner, intense media scrutiny and her police colleagues.
Also, her own personal family drama. With her sister’s ex on the police staff and her new boyfriend rumoured to be a known local criminal. Can Beth find justice for Cameron? And keep the peace at home?

This novel is a great start to a thoroughly modern new series. It has a diverse multitude of characters and plenty of secrets and lies, to keep you guessing. 4*

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Jane Isaac
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Anne Bonny #BlogTour Q&A with @IPatrick_Author #RubiconBook #CrimeFiction #PoliceProcedural @fahrenheitpress Where truth and lies collide. . .

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Rubicon by Ian Patrick
Synopsis:

Two cops, both on different sides of the law – both with the same gangland boss in their sights.

Sam Batford is an undercover officer with the Metropolitan Police who will stop at nothing to get his hands on fearsome crime-lord Vincenzo Guardino’s drug supply.

DCI Klara Winter runs a team on the National Crime Agency, she’s also chasing down Guardino, but unlike Sam Batford she’s determined to bring the gangster to justice and get his drugs off the streets.

Set in a time of austerity and police cuts where opportunities for corruption are rife, Rubicon is a tense, dark thriller that is definitely not for the faint hearted.

Q&A:

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) I left school at sixteen and joined the Civil Service, in Nottingham, as an Admin Clerk. After a few years I decided to apply for the Police. I joined the Metropolitan Police at nineteen and served for twenty-seven years, the majority of which was in Specialist Crime as a Detective Sergeant. I’ve investigated most crimes ranging from Theft to Murder. I’ve also worked in intelligence. My retirement was due to disability. I found out eight years ago that I have Muscular Dystrophy. Retirement led to writing!

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea to writing to publication?

A) I’ve written for years but never taken it seriously until a few years ago. No Exit press had a short story competition and the prize was a publishing contract. I had no expectation but wrote a short story and sent it in. I made the final three! But never won, (Boo!). However that short story became the first chapter of Rubicon and the rest developed from there. I had the usual round of rejections from publishers and agents until Chris McVeigh, at Fahrenheit Press, picked it up and loved it! In addition the BBC have also felt the same way and optioned it for TV, beginning with a six part series.

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) I read widely and rarely read a series, however I do enjoy: George Orwell, Evelyn Waugh, Ed McBain, Lynda La Plant, Cormac McCarthy, Chuck Palahniuk, Colin Bateman, Saira Viola and Jane Issac. If I were to recommend two books they would be: Fight Club By Chuck Palahniuk and The Road by Cormac McCarthy. Both have strong narrative but entirely opposite in terms of structure and story. Both evoke a strong feeling of ‘what have I just experienced?’ That to me is the mark of a great book. One that leaves the reader marvelling at the storyline and the journey they’ve been on.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) I read all the Sven Hassel books as a child. I was mesmerised by the cruel reality of war he portrayed as he had served as a tank driver. In addition to that, James Herriot was another favourite of mine. I didn’t get Famous Five or any of the ‘classic’ children’s reads. I wanted realism in my fiction. This has stayed with me, hence writing crime.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) Without doubt the reader feedback. I’ve been overwhelmed by the positive response Rubicon has received. There’s no better feeling hearing that you’ve made a moment, in a person’s day, pleasurable. For me that’s why I write.

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) My wife. She has to take the strain with the family while I crack on getting words down! She also speaks sense and is the first reader of anything I’ve written. My greatest source of support, outside of home, has been Jane Isaac. She’s guided me along the way and given advice but never dictated what I should do. She’s a fantastic, established, writer and it’s been wonderful to have her friendship and support.

IP: I would like to take this opportunity to thank you, Abby, and all the book blogging community who support writers’ and keep the world of reading and literature alive.

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Ian Patrick
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