Anne Bonny #BookReview No One Home by Tim Weaver 5* #DavidRaker #Series #Mystery #Thriller #NoOneHome

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No One Home by Tim Weaver ~ David Raker #10
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

Nine neighbours gathered on Halloween.
But by the next morning, they had disappeared without a trace.
No bodies, no evidence, and no clues.

Two and a half years later, it remains a mystery.
Desperate for answers, the families of the missing turn to investigator David Raker.
How did an entire village vanish overnight?

And is he looking for nine missing people, or nine dead bodies?

My Review ~

‘Welcome to Black Gate’

No One Here is a terrific novel of suspense and mystery. It feels more like a standalone and can easily be read as one. However, the ending reminds us just why this is such a badass series! It is a cliff-hanger that has me buzzing to read the next title in the series.

‘It wasn’t just the Perry’s that had disappeared it was the whole viullage’

The title opens 2.5yrs after the disappearance of the families of Black Gate. An isolated and rural community, with the residents taking no money, passports or clothes. The local police and Raker are baffled as to how they’ve managed to simply disappear.
The missing residents are:
Chris & Laura Gibbs and their 19ur old son Mark.
Patrick & Francesca Perry.
Randolph Solomon (70yrs) & Emiline Wilson (64yrs)
John (68yrs) & Freda (67yrs) Davey.
All residents had been present that evening at the Gibbs family farm for a planned dinner party that evening. Did an organised killer strike? or did one of the group SNAP?

‘It didn’t look like a home anymore it looked like a mausoleum’
Raker begins by searching the premises of Black Gate and data checks on the financial backgrounds of the residents. But Whilst he finds some suspicious clues, it reaches to no concrete motive…

‘The crime itself was like oxygen. When it was there, a case and a story continued to breathe. When it wasn’t, everything withered and died’

There are alternative chapters set in LA following American cop Joline in 1985. An era of sexism within the LAPD. Joline is attempting to locate various criminals, as she has been nudged out of the largest police hunt… the police hunt for The Night Stalker!

There are some characters from Raker’s past involved in his investigations. We are reminded that not only is Raker an esteemed missing persons investigator. But that the cases are ingrained within his personality.
‘This wasn’t just a job to me missing people were my life’

A cracking new edition to the series and I CANNOT wait to read the next title in the series after that jaw-dropping ending!!!!!! 5*

‘Black Gate had started out as one of the strangest disappearances I’d ever come across’

TW
Tim Weaver
Website
The Authors missing persons Podcast
Twitter
My Review of I Am Missing and Q&A with Tim Weaver
My Review of You Were Gone

Anne Bonny #BookReview Dead Man’s Daughter by @RozWatkins 4.5* @HQstories #CrimeFiction #MegDalton #Series #2 #Derbyshire #Thriller

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Dead Man’s Daughter by Roz Watkins ~ DI Meg Dalton #2
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

She was racing towards the gorge. The place the locals knew as ‘Dead Girl’s Drop’…

DI Meg Dalton is thrown headlong into her latest case when she finds a ten-year-old girl running barefoot through the woods in a blood-soaked nightdress. In the house nearby, the girl’s father has been brutally stabbed to death.

At first Meg suspects a robbery gone tragically wrong, but something doesn’t add up. Why does the girl have no memory of what happened to her? And why has her behaviour changed so dramatically since her recent heart transplant?

The case takes a chilling turn when evidence points to the girl’s involvement in her own father’s murder. As unsettling family secrets emerge, Meg is forced to question her deepest beliefs to discover the shocking truth, before the killer strikes again…

My Review ~

‘Please stop. I can feel. I’m still here’

Di Meg Dalton is summoned to Bellhurst House via a phone call from concerned citizen Elaine Grant. What Meg discovers is a distressed and disorientated little girl (Abbie) of 8/9yrs of age. The girl has what appears to be track marks on her arms, yet otherwise unharmed. She claims to be running from her father…

‘Everyone always dies’ – Abbie

When Meg arrives at the family home, she finds the father of Abbie dead with his throat slit. The mother Rachel is aggressive towards Meg, she claims to be the victim of a stalker. With Abbie’s sister Jess having died years ago due to suicide. Meg must ask the uncomfortable questions and seek the truth of just what has been happening at Bellhurst House?

The family background is revealed and as Meg digs deeper and deeper. We learn that this is far from a happy home. But who is the victim and who is the attacker…

‘Child suspects were treated as victims’

There are diverse characters wrapped up in a complex mystery. There are multiple themes that have been extensively researched and HUGE respect to the author for that. Meg Dalton’s character generates more personality in this title. Maybe this is due to the nature of some of the themes. Or just that she is developing well into cracking protagonist. Either way, this is a great second title in the series. 4.5*

RW
Roz Watkins
Website
Twitter
An Extract of Dead Man’s Daughter
My Review of The Devil’s Dice and Q&A with Roz watkins

Anne Bonny #BlogTour #BookReview The Copycat by Jake Woodhouse @wildgundog 4* #NewRelease #PoliceProcedural #Amsterdam @PenguinUKBooks #Series #JaapRykel

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The Copycat by Jake Woodhouse
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

HE THOUGHT HE CAUGHT THE KILLER, BUT THEN THE KILLING DIDN’T STOP

Jaap Rykel is on the brink, his dark past driving him to breaking point and ending his police career.

Visiting the station one last time, he stumbles across an investigation into a violent murder.

A murder where the details exactly match a case he solved years earlier.

But that killer was caught – and is still in prison.

Is there a copycat killer on the loose, playing games with Rykel’s fragile mind? Or did he get it wrong, and send an innocent man to prison?

This might be his last chance to make things right, or it could be the blow that finally takes him over the edge . . .

My Review ~

Inspector Jaap Rykel is a controversial police officer. He is recently retired due to a psychotic breakdown. He lives his life suffering flashbacks and within the firm grip of PTSD. When Inspector Arno Jansen contacts him for some assistance regarding a case, eerily similar to one previously worked on by Rykel…

‘Killing just to imitate another murderer indicates a special kind of warped mind’

The present case dealing with the murder of Marianne Kleine, draws comparison to the Lucie Muller case from Rykel’s past. Are the victim’s connected? And what does this mean for Lucie’s convicted murder, currently serving a 30yr prison term?

Lucie Muller’s case was high profile due to the nature of her murder and her father’s position within Dutch society. Her father Judge Muller is a tough and ruthless criminal Judge, taking little pity on  those who end up in his courtroom. When Rykel begins to question his findings in the previous case. He not only questions did Sander Klaasen really commit murder? But was the speed from arrest to conviction just far too easy?

The title is a gritty police procedural dealing with the central theme of Rykel’s guilty conscious and search for redemption. It is a complex case and covers various concerts of Dutch law and political policies. The author cleverly describes (and explains) these aspects as you read along. 4*

JW
Jake Woodhouse
Website
Twitter

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Anne Bonny Q&A with #Author of The Savage Shore @david_hewson #NicCosta #Series #CrimeFiction #ItalianMafia #Italy @blackthornbks #TheSavageShore @midaspr

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The Savage Shore by David Hewson
Review To Follow

Synopsis ~

The ‘Ndrangheta is a ruthless mafia organisation, one of the richest and most powerful organised crime groups in the world. Completely impenetrable to outsiders, merciless when crossed, they run the savage Calabrian coast of Italy, their influence everywhere. So why has the head of this feared mob, Lo Spettro, offered to turn state witness?

Detective Nic Costa is sent deep into the mountains to infiltrate this mafia family, with Lo Spettro’s help. With a new identity, Nic becomes one of their own. But one slip up would mean the end not just for the investigation, but for Nic, and his whole team.

Q&A ~

Q) For the readers, can you talk us through your background and the synopsis of your new novel?

A) I’ve been an author for more than twenty five years now, with thirty books or so (you stop counting after a while) to my name. The Savage Shore is a new instalment in a story that started nearly twenty years ago with A Season for the Dead which introduced a young detective called Nic Costa, working with a state police team in the historic centre of Rome. Over the years Nic’s spent most of his time on stories based in Rome, with occasional diversions to Venice and beyond.

When I decided to bring the old crew back, though, I decided to throw a spanner in the works. Usually they’re kings of a castle they know and control very well: Rome. But here they’re strangers in a strange land, sent to Calabria in the south of Italy where they’re meant to organise the defection of a gang lord into police custody so he can turn state witness.

The problem is no one knows who the gang lord is, how they can find him, how they can extricate him and his family safely out of a gang that would surely murder them all if they knew what was going on. To make contact Nic has to go undercover and pretend he’s part of the crime clan, and the rest of the team have to wait under false identities on the coast.

Pretty soon it appears nothing, in the fabled land of Calabria, is really what it seems.

Q) Can you talk us through the journey from idea, to writing and finally to publication?

A) I tend to be very logical about these things and decide some key issued to begin with. The first here was location: I knew it wasn’t going to be in Rome, and I was very interested in Calabria as a backdrop. It’s got an amazing culture and history of its own – not just Italian but ancient Greece as well. And it’s the home of a crime gang which is huge and very powerful, the ’Ndrangheta.

After the location came the style of the narrative. As I said I wanted Nic and co to be strangers in a strange land. So I hit upon the idea of making them become almost criminals themselves, having to hide their true identities, which isn’t easy given they’re decent people who don’t like to keep things secret.

Another element of the book is that each section of the story is preceded by a brief extract from a fictional tourist guide to the area. This gives the readers some context to the story, but also, as the narrative proceeds, we begin to realise that this device is also part of the main story too.

Then I needed an opening which came when I was driving round Reggio, the capital of Calabria. I invented a bar for crooks, an illegal immigrant forced to work behind it, and a monkey with a taste for drink. Then in walk some people with guns…

Q) What are your favourite authors and recommended reads?

A) That’s always a tough one to answer. I’m reluctant to name living rime authors because you always leave out someone you should have mentioned and the likelihood is they’re going to notice. So… current authors of non-fiction, Mary Beard for her great work on Rome, the history books of Tom Holland. Dead authors: Robert Graves, Mario Puzo, Mary Renault.

I, Claudius is one of my favourite books, something I reread from time to time for the beautiful simplicity of its writing and structure, and the timeless nature of the story it tells: a decent man becomes the monster he loathes.

Q) What were your childhood/teenage favourite reads?

A) Anything I could lay my hands on in my local library: Ray Bradbury, lots and lots of science fiction by people whose names escape me now, Conan Doyle, Saki, HP Lovecraft…

Q) What are you currently reading?

A) The Garden of the Finzi-Continis by Giorgio Bassani, a story about the Jewish community in Ferrara just before the start of the Second World War. A very unusual book that’s both an emotional story of failed loved but also darkened by the coming of fascism to people who’ve no idea the world is changing.

Q) What has been your favourite moment of being a published author?

A) My favourite moment is always the one when you know a book is finished – edited, revised, done.

Q) Who has been your source of support/encouragement, throughout the writing process?

A) You always rely on the advice and support of agent and your editors. Without them we’d never be able to achieve a thing. Writers are lone wolves but we need to connect with the flock too. I’ve been lucky in that I’ve worked with some of the best over the years.

DH
David Hewson
Website
Twitter
Facebook
Instagram

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Anne Bonny #BookReview Never Tell by@LisaGardnerBks 5* #NewRelease #CrimeFiction #Thriller #Mystery #DDWarren #Series ‘The novel is a dark and twisted web of murder, arson, secrets and lies’

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Never Tell by Lisa Gardner
Review Copy

Synopsis ~

One death might be an accident.
Two deaths looks like murder.

A man is shot dead in his own home, and his pregnant wife, Evie, is found with the gun in her hands.

Detective D.D. Warren instantly recognises her. Sixteen years ago, Evie also shot her own father. That killing was ruled an accident.

D.D. doesn’t believe in coincidences. But this case isn’t as open and shut as it first appears, and her job is to discover the truth.

Evie might be a victim.

Or she might be about to get away with murder again.

My Review ~

‘My Husband’
‘He’s been shot. He’s dead’ – Evie

Never Tell focuses on protagonist Evie Carter, her past, her present and the men she leaves dead in her wake.
But is Evie innocent or guilty of murder?
Surely no one can be a victim in both cases?
Do coincidences really occur in first degree murder cases?

Detective D.D Warren is a workaholic cop with the Boston homicide unit. She was the police officer on the case of Evie’s fathers murder. When he was shot at his computer desk 16yrs ago. Warren becomes convinced Evie is a killer with secrets to hide.

‘For the second time in her life, Evie Carter’s gonna get away with murder’

At the scene of Evie’s husbands murder, in the present day. Evie remains calm, composed and cooperative as she is charged with murder. She shows no signs of physical abuse, tests positive for GSR and makes no denials. Evie is also five months pregnant…

‘I haven’t even met my baby yet, and I’m already filled with so many regrets’

Flora Dane, kidnap victim and confidential informant of warren; throws another spanner in the works when she recognises Conrad (Evie’s husband) from her past with kidnapper Jacob Ness. If Conrad is connected to Jacob, is he a predator? Was Evie just protecting herself and her unborn child?

Warren believes the answers must lie in the past and begins digging into Evie’s fathers crime scene, the potential motives and evidence. Evie’s father was a Harvard professor and mathematical genius with a photographic memory. What secrets lay behind what happened that day? And what drives a pregnant wife to killer her husband? What is Evie’s motive?

The novel is a dark and twisted web of murder, arson, secrets and lies. Gripping 5*

LG
Lisa Gardner
Website
Twitter