Anne Bonny #BlogTour #CharacterProfile Lost You by @HaylenBeck #Psychological #Thriller @HarvillSecker @vintagebooks You’re searching for your son. But she found him first.

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Lost You by Haylen Beck
Review To Follow

Synopsis ~

When a little boy goes missing, his mother desperately wants to find him . . . before someone else does. Perfect for fans of Lisa Jewell, Shari Lapena and Cara Hunter.

Libby would do anything for her three-year-old son Ethan. And after all they’ve been through, a holiday seems the perfect antidote for them both. Their hotel is peaceful, safe and friendly, yet Libby can’t help feeling that someone is watching her. Watching Ethan. Because, for years, Libby has lived with a secret.

Just days into their holiday, when Libby is starting to relax, Ethan steps into an elevator on his own, and the doors close before Libby can stop them. Moments later, Ethan is gone.

Libby thought she had been through the worst, but her nightmare is only just beginning. And in a desperate hunt for her son, it becomes clear she’s not the only one looking for him.

Who will find him first?

Character Profile ~ Anna 

Anna

Anna Lenihan lives in a mobile-home village over in Lafayette. She tries to make it feel like a home. She mows the lawn in summer, sweeps up the leaves in the fall, and shovels snow in the winter. She’s been working tables at the Flatiron Bar & Grill for nine months, and had just started to make a hole in her debts. But then her boss calls her in to his office and tells her he has to let her go.

And now she’s been fired, for no concrete reason other than ‘last one in, first one out’, she doesn’t know what to do.

Then someone finds her and offers her a chance to start again, an opportunity to make some money and get out of the mobile-home village for good.

That’s when Anna meets Libby…

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Anne Bonny Top 5 #ww2Fiction #Historical picks from the TBR pile @VirginiaBaily @swlittlefield @CescaWrites @jingwrites Katie Quinn @ThatSadieJones @FleetReads @WmMorrowBooks @CorvusBooks @OneworldNews @vintagebooks

***Here are some books from my ww2 fiction TBR pile, that I am DYING to read. In no particular order***

the fourth shore
The Fourth Shore by Virginia Baily
Available in HB/Ebook/Audible – PB March 2020
Synopsis ~

The Fourth Shore: the sliver of fertile land along the Tripoli coast, the ‘lost’ territory Mussolini promised to reclaim for Italy. Which is how, in 1929, seventeen-year-old Liliana Cattaneo arrives there from Rome on a ship filled with eager colonists to join her brother and his new wife.

Liliana is sure she was on the brink of a great adventure, but what awaits her is not the Mediterranean idyll of cocktail parties, smart dances, dashing officers and romantic intrigues she had imagined. Instead she finds a world of persecution, violence, repression, corruption and deceptions both great and small.

A child of fascist Italy, blown about by the winds of fascism and Catholicism, Liliana becomes enmeshed in a dark liaison which has terrible consequences both for her and those she loves most.

The Fourth Shore is the engrossing and intensely poignant story of Liliana’s journey from Rome to Tripoli to a north London suburb where, as plain Lily Jones, she begins to uncover a secret she has buried so deeply that even she is far from certain what it is.

The daisy children
The Daisy Children by Sofia Grant
Available in PB/Ebook/Audible
Synopsis ~

Inspired by true events, in Sofia Grant’s powerfully moving new novel a young woman peels back the layers of her family’s history, discovering a tragedy in the past that explains so much of the present. This unforgettable story is one of hope, healing, and the discovery of truth.

Sometimes the untold stories of the past are the ones we need to hear…
When Katie Garrett gets the unexpected news that she’s received an inheritance from the grandmother she hardly knew, it couldn’t have come at a better time. She flees Boston—and her increasingly estranged husband—and travels to rural Texas.
There, she’s greeted by her distant cousin Scarlett. Friendly, flamboyant, eternally optimistic, Scarlett couldn’t be more different from sensible Katie. And as they begin the task of sorting through their grandmother’s possessions, they discover letters and photographs that uncover the hidden truths about their shared history, and the long-forgotten tragedy of the New London school explosion of 1937 that binds them.

the silent hours
The Silent Hours by Cesca Major
Available in PB/Ebook/Audible
Synopsis ~

An epic, sweeping tale set in wartime France, The Silent Hours follows three people whose lives are bound together, before war tears them apart:

Adeline, a mute who takes refuge in a convent, haunted by memories of her past;

Sebastian, a young Jewish banker whose love for the beautiful Isabelle will change the course of his life dramatically;

Tristin, a nine-year-old boy, whose family moves from Paris to settle in a village that is seemingly untouched by war.

Beautifully wrought, utterly compelling and with a shocking true story at its core, The Silent Hours is an unforgettable portrayal of love and loss.

how we disappeared
How We Disappeared by Jing-Jing Lee
Available in HB/Ebook/Audible – PB April 2020
Synopsis ~

The heart-rending story of survival and endurance in Japanese-occupied Singapore

Singapore, 1942.
As Japanese troops sweep down Malaysia and into Singapore, a village is ransacked, leaving only three survivors, one of them a tiny child.

In a neighbouring village, seventeen-year-old Wang Di is bundled into the back of a troop carrier and shipped off to a Japanese military brothel. After sixty years of silence, what she saw and experienced there still haunts her.

And in the year 2000, twelve-year-old Kevin is sitting beside his ailing grandmother when he overhears a mumbled confession. He sets out to discover the truth, wherever it might lead, setting in motion a chain of events he could never have foreseen.

Weaving together two timelines and two very big secrets, this evocative, profoundly moving and utterly dazzling debut opens a window on a little-known period of history, and heralds the arrival of a thrilling new literary star.

the alice network
The Alice Network by Katie Quinn
Available in HB/Ebook/Audible/PB
Synopsis ~

In an enthralling new historical novel from national bestselling author Kate Quinn, two women—a female spy recruited to the real-life Alice Network in France during World War I and an unconventional American socialite searching for her cousin in 1947—are brought together in a mesmerizing story of courage and redemption.

1947. In the chaotic aftermath of World War II, American college girl Charlie St. Clair is pregnant, unmarried, and on the verge of being thrown out of her very proper family. She’s also nursing a desperate hope that her beloved cousin Rose, who disappeared in Nazi-occupied France during the war, might still be alive. So when Charlie’s parents banish her to Europe to have her “little problem” taken care of, Charlie breaks free and heads to London, determined to find out what happened to the cousin she loves like a sister.

1915. A year into the Great War, Eve Gardiner burns to join the fight against the Germans and unexpectedly gets her chance when she’s recruited to work as a spy. Sent into enemy-occupied France, she’s trained by the mesmerizing Lili, the “Queen of Spies”, who manages a vast network of secret agents right under the enemy’s nose.
Thirty years later, haunted by the betrayal that ultimately tore apart the Alice Network, Eve spends her days drunk and secluded in her crumbling London house. Until a young American barges in uttering a name Eve hasn’t heard in decades, and launches them both on a mission to find the truth…no matter where it leads.

**EXTRA PICK**
Not ww2 fiction, but set post-ww2 in Cyprus. I also CANNOT resist this epic cover!
small wars
Small Wars by Sadie Jones
Available in PB/Ebook
Synopsis ~

Hal Treherne is a soldier on the brink of a brilliant career. Impatient to see action, his other commitment in life is to his beloved wife, Clara, and when Hal is transferred to Cyprus she and their twin daughters join him. But the island is in the heat of the emergency; the British are defending the colony against Cypriots – schoolboys and armed guerillas alike – battling for union with Greece.

Clara shares Hal’s sense of duty and honour; she knows she must settle down, make the best of things, smile. But action changes Hal, and the atrocities he is drawn into take him not only further from Clara but himself, too; a betrayal that is only the first step down a dark path.

Anne Bonny #BookReview Freefall by @jessbarryauthor @vintagebooks @HarvillSecker #NewRelease #Psychological #Thriller

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Freefall by Jessica Barry
Review Copy
Synopsis:

Surviving the plane crash is only the beginning for Allison.

The life that she’s built for herself – her perfect fiancé, their world of luxury – has disappeared in the blink of an eye. Now she must run, not only to escape the dark secrets in her past, but to outwit the man who is stalking her every move.

On the other side of the country, Allison’s mother is desperate for news of her daughter, who is missing, presumed dead. Maggie refuses to accept that she could have lost her only child and sets out to discover the truth.

Mother and daughter must fight – for survival and to find their way through a dark web of lies and back to one another, before it’s too late…

My Review:

Freefall had me hooked from the start and I absolutely loved the writing style. The novel centres around a plane crash and the fall out in the aftermath. Not my usual type of read but yet I fully enjoyed the story and constant twists.

‘There is no sign of another human’

Alison is on-board the aircraft and survives the crash, walking wounded. Her phone is broken and she knows, that if she is to continue to survive she must take supplies and leave the aircraft wreckage. A daunting task when she has no idea where she is and yet feels a presence of someone on her tail…

‘I know what’s coming for me’ – Alison

Maggie is alone at home, when she is informed from rookie cop Shannon Draper, of a plane crash involving her daughter. The crash has happened in the Colorado Rockies and Alison is assumed dead. Despite the two having been estranged at the time of the accident. Maggie vows to find answers.

‘The plan is stay alive’

Throughout the novel we learn of Maggie and Alison’s past and what led them to be estranged. We also learn of Alison’s whirlwind romance with new fiancé Ben Gardner. It would appear Alison had everything to live for…
‘Everyone has his price. You never know who’s been paid’ – Alison

This novel is much deeper and more complex than I originally thought. 5*

JB
Jessica Barry
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Anne Bonny #BookReview Macbeth by #JoNesbo #CrimeFiction #HogarthShakespere @vintagebooks ‘A great edition to the Hogarth Shakespeare series’

my copy
Macbeth by Jo Nesbo
Review Copy
Synopsis:

He’s the best cop they’ve got.

When a drug bust turns into a bloodbath it’s up to Inspector Macbeth and his team to clean up the mess.
He’s also an ex-drug addict with a troubled past.

He’s rewarded for his success. Power. Money. Respect. They’re all within reach.

But a man like him won’t get to the top.

Plagued by hallucinations and paranoia, Macbeth starts to unravel. He’s convinced he won’t get what is rightfully his.
Unless he kills for it.

My Review:

Macbeth is the Third Hogarth Shakespeare novel I have read. Having previously enjoyed New Boy by Tracy Chevalier and Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood. This is however, my FIRST novel by Jo Nesbo despite owning the 11 Harry Hole novels. It is a series I am reluctant to start because I know I will want to devour each title one after the other.
I will also be investing in the four other standalone novels by the author.

Macbeth is a gritty and harsh look into police corruption and organised crime. I felt the author had done an incredible job of adapting the original into a modern-day setting. With Macbeth the reluctant dirty cop and the city with its prostitute ‘witches’.

‘Everyone has a price’

The novel shows how the narcotics unit, SWAT team and gang unit work independently of one another but are eventually brought together after police corruption and malpractice is exposed. The new unit (OCU) organised crime unit with unite all three departments under the supervision of one senior office.
But who will be the officer in charge and wield the power over the city?
‘For Eternal loyalty is inhuman and betrayal is human’

Macbeth’s love a casino boss named ‘Lady’ plays the role of Lady Macbeth to the letter. She is cunning and desperate for the two to hold power over the entire city.
‘You have to kill Duncan’ – Lady

Betrayal and power go hand in hand in this character driven novel. I was intrigued by so many minor characters/themes. Such as, the one-eyed drug addict and the ‘Brew’ the new drug doing the rounds on Scotland’s streets.

A great edition to the Hogarth Shakespeare series.
One I am sure my GCSE teen would love to study much more than the original. 4*

JN
Jo Nesbo
Website

Anne Bonny #BookReview The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood 5* Genius #VintageClassics #HandmaidsTale #PraiseBe #BlessedBeTheFruit #UnderHisEye @vintagebooks

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The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
My own copy
Synopsis:

‘I believe in the resistance as I believe there can be no light without shadow; or rather, no shadow unless there is also light.’

Offred is a Handmaid in The Republic of Gilead, a religious totalitarian state in what was formerly known as the United States. She is placed in the household of The Commander, Fred Waterford – her assigned name, Offred, means ‘of Fred’. She has only one function: to breed. If Offred refuses to enter into sexual servitude to repopulate a devastated world, she will be hanged. Yet even a repressive state cannot eradicate hope and desire. As she recalls her pre-revolution life in flashbacks, Offred must navigate through the terrifying landscape of torture and persecution in the present day, and between two men upon which her future hangs.

Masterfully conceived and executed, this haunting vision of the future places Margaret Atwood at the forefront of dystopian fiction.

My Review:

I am currently making my way through season two of the TV series. I am feeling more and more disturbed with every episode. One night in particular, I had a nightmare in which I was in the full red dress and bonnet!!!! Now if this isn’t scary enough, I was burying my books. As a woman, I was no longer allowed to read! Oh, the sheer horror!!!!!
After this unsettling night’s sleep I decided I simply HAD to read the novel and know the how/what/when/where.
What I found is an in-depth novel that I digested in five straight hours. I was horrified and scared, yet I couldn’t take my eyes away from the pages.
Margaret Atwood is one impressive author.

‘They’ve removed anything you could tie a rope to’

The entire narrative is from Offred’s perspective. For which she is Offred, not June. We meet fellow handmaid’s Alma, Janine, Dolores and Moira. All of which go on to take their commanders names, as June has Of-Fred. The handmaid’s lifestyle is bleak, terrifying and at times depressing for the reader. It shows a lifestyle that would strike fear into most women.

‘A return to traditional values’

Offred is at her third house, the home of former gospel singer Serena Joy. We are introduced to the ‘Martha’s’ in the kitchen Rita and Cora. Martha’s are infertile women of low status. We also meet the homes guardian Nick who also has a relatively low status. But who regularly crosses the line with Offred via way of winks and eye contact. Which leads her to ponder if he is ‘an eye’ a type of informant to the Republic of Gilead. At her time at the house Offred dreams of escape, but just what kind of escape is left open to interpretation. . . .

‘It’s those other escapes, the ones you can open in yourself, given a cutting edge’

Offred is partnered with Ofglen for her only luxury of a simple walk to the shops. The often take walks to ‘the wall’ where traitors of the regime hang for all to see. Eventually it is through these meetings that we learn of the plight of others. Such as, Ofwarren (Janine) who is now heavily pregnant. The indoctrinate of Aunt Lydia has had the largest impact on Janine’s psychology. She is well and truly a programmed Handmaid.
On their journey back the girls are accosted by Japanese tourists, hoping for a picture of the famous handmaid’s. Offred and Ofglen are shocked to see women dressed as they once did in their past lives. It reminds them how much their lives have changed.

Through the narrative we learn of ‘gender treachery’ aka being homosexual. That unwomen are sent to the colonies, which is a death sentence of hard labour. We also learn that only 1/4 babies are born an unbaby. That this is due to the high levels of pollution, that caused the situation of infertility in the first place.

‘It’s not the husbands you have to watch out for, said Aunt Lydia, it’s the wives’

Serena Joy (Pam) used to enjoy giving speeches on the ‘sanctity of home’. Now she finds herself a prisoner to a regime of her own making. Although she enjoys a much higher status than Offred. She is still a woman and therefore sanctioned as so.

Offred must endure monthly obligatory tests which include urine, hormones, cancer smear and blood tests. In Gilead there is no such thing as sterile men. There are only fruitful women and barren women. It is a regime designed around female control and male dominance. A regime for which I am sure, I couldn’t last the week.
But the will to survive is human trait.

‘Sanity is a valuable possession’

Offred reflects upon and longs for her daughter. We are unaware of Offred’s full background. But we know that her daughter was 5yrs old when taken and now must be approximately 8yrs old. Offred longs for news of her child and this will provide an emotional pull, for all mother’s who read this novel. To be stripped of your rights as a woman, human being and mother. Is a life truly unworth living.

There is a particular scene at the red centre (handmaid training facility) where Janine must take part in ‘testifying’ she must go into personal details of her past. Her gang rape and subsequent abortion. It is a harrowing scene. You come to understand how her fragile mind could be easily manipulated, with just the right amount of human despair and suffering administered.

‘Love is not the point’ – Aunt Lydia

The Gileadean regime is explored in a much different way than the TV series. At times it feels more personal and harrowing as the voice of Offred infects your inner most thoughts. Yet the visuals from the TV series really add the sense of realism. As we watch this insane regime brought to life.

I can easily see why this is a classic novel and I am glad that due to the TV series adaption more and more modern women and women of future generations will read/watch and listen. I was only 2yrs old when this novel was first published, and it’ll be one I will NEVER forget!
5* Genius

‘I wish I was ignorant,
so I didn’t know how ignorant I am’

MA
Margaret Atwood
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